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Unit 1 Activities Around Me

Learning Unit 1: Activities around Me

Class: Infant 1                     Theme: “Learn, Play, Work”                          Estimated frame:     1 week

Context:

Children at the Infant Level are involved in countless activities which may be categorized as learning, playing or working. It is important for the adults around these young children to enhance their interaction, awareness and success when involved in learning, playing and working exercises.

The topic of this unit – “Activities Around Me” seeks to capture all the fun happenings and wonderful experiences of our young learners and use them as learning tools in the classroom. When learning is related to things children KNOW, and presented in ways they not only UNDERSTAND, but ENJOY, teachers can be sure that they have succeeded! This unit integrates content areas/subjects and ensures that all content areas/subjects are addressed.

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

1.    Read, understand and experience delight with different genres of fiction and nonfiction literary texts related to activities at school, play and work.

2.    Explore the co-existence of Creole and Standard English in Trinidad and  Tobago through contrasting common utterances used while learning, playing and working (at school and at home).

3.    Determine the purpose and intended audience of simple media texts as posters, pictures and signs.

4.    Create visual media for a particular purpose and audience.

5.    Demonstrate common courtesies through behaviours and language while interacting.

6.    Respond to ‘Yes’/‘No’ questions and basic instructions in Spanish.

7.    Develop vocabulary associated with time when describing activities at school, while playing and working.

8.    Develop and follow rules collaboratively for activities engaged in at school and immediate environment to promote cooperation and safety.

9.    Explore occupations and activities related to disaster preparedness.

10.  Develop scenarios based on given topics related to activities at school, play and work. (VAPA)

11.  Demonstrate an awareness of and concern for disabilities that may exist among others. (HFLE)

12.  Demonstrate the ability to use Reading Comprehension skills and strategies explicitly taught, to make meaning. (ELA)

13.  Sing simple action songs and composed songs based on learning, playing and working activities with accuracy. (VAPA)

14.  Know how to generate sentences using grammatical patterns in context from various stimuli. (ELA)

15.  Display an understanding of selected forms of media. (ELA)

16.  Use comprehension skills and strategies to understand texts. (ELA)

17.  Know appropriate appreciative and discriminative listening behaviours. (ELA)

18.  Demonstrate that meaning can be derived from interacting with literary works.

19.  Display confidence and comfort in imaginatively expressing self to familiar groups of people.

Learning Plans:

1.    Origami, Oral Communication, Introductory Spanish

2.    Things I do when I am…(learning, playing and working)

3.    Activities that take a long/short time

4.    Disaster Preparedness – Hurricane

5.    Getting Ready for a Hurricane

6.    Mini Read-a-thon

Resources:

·         Simple Journal: Student reflection in a simple ‘frame’ as part of journal writing after all or selected reading or learning experiences.

·         T-charts showing the difference between how something may be said in Creole and Standard English.

·         Paper (plain and coloured), colours (paint, crayons, pencils), paint brushes, safety scissors, pictures, glue or tape, decorative accessories (shinning dust, stickers, stamps), markers for creating “Mini-Book” I can….I am…..I _____ etc.

·         Teacher checklist: to observe specific behaviours while students interact, speak, listen and perform.

·         Video recording equipment: camera or camcorder to video tape students while they interact and perform during activities; a laptop or television for re-play of clip created.

·         Checklists: can be used for observing students’ use and understanding of Spanish instructions and ‘Yes’/’No’ questions, cooperative behaviours, aspects of language and language use etc.

·         Pictures, posters, newspaper advertisements, books and other simple media texts

·         Teacher made and/or online worksheets for different activities

·         CDs and DVDs, copies of songs, pictures associated with and related to songs

·         Online sites from which worksheets, suggested activities, pictures and other related materials can be sourced.

Websites to consult:

1.    General site for ALL content areas which may include free and member resources:  http://www.superteacherworksheets.comwww.teachersnetwork.org/; http://www.bbc.co.uk; www.edhelper.com/;

2.    DISASTER PREPAREDNESS: http://www.odpm.gov.tt/; http://odpm.gov.tt/node/660 (Extension: Guidelines for earthquake drill.); http://www.odpm.gov.tt/node/245 (Interactive Hazard maps.);

3.    STORIES/LITERARY TEXTS: http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/introduction-using-storia-classroom (‘Storia’ e-books and interactive reading allowing for differentiation.)

4.    HURRICANES: www.wikipedia.org/

 

Assessment:

  • CONVERSATIONS: Student-teacher conferences and interviews before, during and after activities, questioning and teacher feedback during activities, entries into simple journals (using words, sentences, pictures or drawings)
  • OBSERVATIONS: Teacher checklists, simple rubrics
  • PRODUCT: Scrapbook, Mini-Book, posters, list of rules and any/all other products of learning activities during the unit to be assessed via checklists, carefully planned rubrics, mini-booths for other classes to experience the work produced.

 

 

  UNIT 1: Activities Around Me

Learning Plan: 1 of 6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Learn, Work, Play

Duration: 1 hour  30 minutes

Topic:  “Origami And Oral Communication – Si”       

Context:

Children love to use their hands; it is their primary medium of interacting with and learning about the world around them. One way of channelling this innate, tactile curiosity is through origami. A well-selected origami activity is also a great way of rehearsing and reinforcing: oral communication skills, particularly listening, psychomotor and mathematical skills and, creativity. This Learning Plan also seeks to infuse a beginners level knowledge of Spanish to expose these young learners to the excitement of learning about another language and culture.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral

Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☐Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         Display all taught listening etiquette behaviours during an origami activity: maintaining eye-contact, appropriate sitting or standing posture, appropriate facial expression, showing interest by gestures, not speaking while listening and showing appreciation after listening.

·         Display all taught speaking/conversation etiquette behaviours  during an origami activity: turn taking, appropriate volume, raising hand for attention, appropriate greetings, expressions of thanks/apologies and use of manners.

·         Respond to ‘Yes’/ ‘No’ in Spanish.

·         Express basic courtesies in Spanish.

·         Respond to basic classroom instructions in Spanish.

·         Understand affirmations / positive reinforcement in Spanish. 

·         Follow directions and instructions related to an origami exercise.

·         Create a simple object via an origami exercise.

·         Identify plane shapes (2D shapes) which may be formed during an origami exercise.

  • Express thoughts, feelings and opinions orally and in writing on the origami exercise as well as on their peer’s origami product.

Activities:

Spanish concepts:

  1. Students would be asked “yes/no” questions relating to situations, pictures etc. Each time the students answer “Yes/No.” the answer “si/no” would be reinforced by the teacher. Students would then be asked other “yes/no” questions to which they must respond in Spanish.
  2. Students are presented with situations which give them the opportunity to say “Thank you.” or “Please.” Each time the students say the words, “Thank you.” or “Please.” the Spanish words “Gracias” or “‘Por favor” would be spoken by the teacher. Students would be asked to guess the meaning of the words.’
  3. Students would be afforded the opportunity to practise the words through role playing. Careful attention should be paid to accuracy in pronunciation.

 Children sing a song to reinforce meaning of the words ‘Gracias’ and ‘Por  Favor’

  1. Respond to simple instructions given in Spanish. (N.B. Students should only know the meaning of the instruction. They are not to learn to say it.)

Siéntense (Sit down)

Levántense (Stand up)

Atención (Pay attention)

Game of ‘Simon Says’ is used to practise these Instructions.

  1. Understand affirmations / positive reinforcement in Spanish

Bien (Good)

Excelente (Excellent)

Perfecto (Perfect)

a.    These are used during the activities that follow.

 

Review of Oral Communication Etiquette

6.    Students are prompted to recall the skills and etiquette taught over the last two terms. They are reminded to apply these skills when communicating (listening and speaking). Students told that they will be observed and assessed during the activities and possibly rewarded for appropriate behaviours displayed.

 

Origami Exercise

7.    Teacher selects an appropriate activity using key phrases under

Resources” below or any other websites or books which he/she will use for the origami exercise with the students.

 

Discovery of Plane Shapes

  1. Students are guided and prompted during the origami exercise to discover/identify plane shapes as triangle, rectangle, square, oval, circle, cone and polygons (focus on the shape, NOT the name).

 

9.    Students are reminded to respond ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ in Spanish during the activity – teacher uses the simple instruction given in Spanish, as often as possible.

 

Show and Tell [and Respond]

  1. Students use the ‘stage area’ in their classroom to display and speak about their origami experience including: challenges, favourite part of activity, use of object and opinions of peer’s work. Students’ speaking etiquette skills are assessed in this activity. (Students who are the ‘audience’ may be asked to respond to each ‘presentation’ by repeating the main points and expressing her/his own thoughts and feelings on what was said.

 

Writing in Journal

  1. Students are guided to write in their journal or somewhere ‘special’ (even on the origami piece/object) about theirexperience or any aspect of any of the series of activities that form part of this Learning Plan.

 

Extension

12.   More than one origami activity can be done in this Learning Plan depending on the level of difficulty of the one selected and the students’ capabilities. Teacher can also opt to do more than one starting with a very simple one progressing to more difficult ones

Resources:

·          Origami activities – Search key phrases: “origami resource centre”, “origami instructions for kids”

·         Paper for origami exercise, teacher checklist and rubric, video recording equipment, classroom ‘stage’ (The stage could be a simple elevated area in the classroom to an elaborate structure that is a miniature version of a real stage.

 

Song :

 Por Favor y Gracias – Sung to the tune of “Hush Little Baby”

If you want a snack to eat

Or if you want to share my treat,

If you want a cup of tea

Tell me what you’d say to me

Please or por favor are the words you use

Please or por favor are the words you choose.

 

When I give you a little snack

When I share my treat with you

If I give a cup of tea

Tell me what you’d say to me

Thank you or gracias are the words you use

Thank you or gracias are the words you’d choose.

 

Gracias or thanks are words you say

Por favor please you should use everyday

These are words that make you so cool

Use these words in and out of school.

 

Suggested Situation Responses

1. Your friend shares his snack with you.

2. You want your teacher to allow you to go to the tap.

3. You want someone to lend you a pen.

4. You get a birthday present from your cousin.

5. Your mom helps you with your homework.

6. You want your friend to play a game with you.

7. You want to use your brother’s phone to call your mom.

8. Your teacher gives you a star for doing well in your schoolwork.

9. You want your mom to buy you a pack of cookies.

10. Your friend tells you that you can ride his new bike

 

 

Assessment:

·         Observation: Teacher checklist for oral communication skills, video record students during activities for whole class review and discussion at a later time.

·         Conversation: Show and Tell exercise

·         Product: the product of the origami exercise can be assessed using a simple rubric.

·         Simon Says Game

·         Situation responses

 

   

                                                                                   

 


 

  UNIT 1: Activities Around Me

Learning Plan: 2 of 6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Learn, Play, Work

Duration:  3 hours

Topic:  Things I do when I am…       

Context:

Children are aware of and engaged in many types of activities around them. This learning experience allows these young learners to explore and learn through the same things they do and see people doing every day. The exploration strategies for this Learning Plan include drama, modern technology, media literacy and demonstrations.

.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         list at least four activities associated with each of the three categories: play, work and school

·         imitate everyday actions associated with learning, playing and doing chores (working) through posture, voice and hand gestures

·         compose captions/words and sentences to represent illustrations/pictures using standard English and grammatical structures taught

·         identify key features of pictures, signs, posters (and other simple visual media texts) that provide meaning including colour, graphics and captions/words

·         categorize pictures into one of three given groups – activities related to:

1. learning      2. playing     3. working

·         decorate a picture using unique materials

·         demonstrate proper handling, care and use of a simple digital camera for taking still shots

·         capture still shots using a simple digital camera

·         evaluate still shots taken during activities, based on at least one simple criterion

·         read texts fluently with appropriate pronunciation.

Activities:

Stimulus

1.    Students are prepared for the audio-visual activity. They experience a video clip, preferably of themselves (previously taken by the teacher) or one found online where children are engaged in regular school and play activities, and where possible, activities at home. The video may include adults at their work. (Clip may be done in two parts – activities at work being the second part.) Students are led in a discussion on the activities presented in the video; teacher ensures the focus is on types of activities done in the three ‘environments’ – while learning, playing and working. Where audio visual equipment is not available, students are asked to observe their peers engaged in role play.

 

Drama: REQUIRES AN AREA THAT ALLOWS STUDENTS TO MOVE FREELY.

2.    This is a whole class activity which is recorded using a digital camera/camcorder. Students imitate an activity performed while at school, playing or doing chores/working. Suggestions came be made by either the teacher or a student. Reference should be made to the previous video clip for ideas/suggestions.

NB: Students may need to be taught how to use body posture, voice and hand gestures to imitate an activity; teacher demonstrates. Students are reminded to pay attention to personal space, safety while moving, high and low movements, and moving appropriately to the rhythm of the music accompanying the activity. (If students do not know about high and low movements, personal space and rhythm, it would be necessary here to teach these concepts.) Teacher may opt for different pieces of music with different paces – slow, faster, very fast etc.

 

Students compose sentences to explain their actions and perhaps prompted to explain the importance of actions etc. Sentences can be used as an opportunity to reinforce grammatical patterns taught, for example, ‘I am[a + noun (doctor)/adjective + noun (beautiful nurse)], [-ing verb (sweeping)’], ‘She/He is’, ‘We are’, ‘They are’

(The recording of this learning experience can be used in a subsequent Learning Plan either in or out of this unit.)

 

Picture Activity

3.    Students are provided with a range of pictures (one picture is repeated only about three times) depicting activities they earlier imitated/dramatized from which each child chooses ONE. Students can colour, paint or stick items (dhal grains, coloured rice etc.) on pictures. They write a sentence on the picture using cue words which the teacher provided – may be written on the board, or on cards.

 

Visual Media

4.    Students are exposed to new visual media texts including signs, posters and pictures from the ‘learn, play, work’ environment. Attention is focused on use of graphics, colour and captions to ‘send the message’ – students and teacher discuss (for instance – red for danger; one word warnings in CAPITAL letters etc.)

 

Categorize Pictures

5.    Students categorize the pictures they ‘coloured’ (Activity #3) as well as the additional visual texts introduced at activity #4.

 

Things I do when I am learning

Things I do when I am playing

Things I do when I am working

Picture & Sentence

Picture & Sentence

Picture & Sentence

1.   

Picture & Sentence

2.   

Picture & Sentence

3.   

Picture & Sentence

 

Picture Taking  

6.    Students use a simple digital camera to take still shots of classmates during activities; at least two shots to be taken per student. Pictures are stored and will be viewed after all pictures are taken.

 

TEACHER CAN CREATE OR SOURCE A POSTER SHOWING THE STEPS BELOW

OR CREATE OR SOURCE A SHORT VIDEO CLIP DEMONSTRATING THE STEPS

Steps for taking a picture (students to be taught these as simply as possible):

a.    Put the string around the wrist (to ensure the camera does not fall even if it slips out of the hands).

b.    Hold camera with both hands making sure not to block the lens with fingers or hands. Show where and how the RIGHT index finger must position to hold-down the shutter release (button to snap/take the picture).

c.     Look at the screen for the image, making sure you see what you want to capture/take a picture of; to change focus, move forward or backward.

d.    Quick review if option is available – picture remains for viewing for a few seconds after the picture is taken to know if it needs to be re-taken.

 

Picture Evaluating

7.    Students to be made aware of the purpose of the activity – “It is important to review pictures especially when learning and also to know if the picture needs to be re-taken.”

·         Suggested criterion for evaluating pictures:

“Does the picture get the whole person/object?”

For viewing pictures: connect camera to a screen [computer/television] for students to discuss and evaluate the ‘quality’ of the picture based on at least one criterion. Mini-discussions on pictures are necessary.

If students can manage, they can suggest ways photos could be ‘improved’.

 

Extension:

·         A photo story can be created using the students’ pictures form this Learning Plan. Students can assist in its creation using a Photo Story (free online software). A slide show with background music can also be easily created with simple, easily available programs (very easily downloadable).

·         In small groups, students can write a few sentences describing a particular activity related to any of the three categories – “Learn, Play, Work”

 

Resources:

 

Video clip (teacher-made or sourced), pieces of music for drama activity audio player (radio/computer and portable speakers), pictures and creative materials to be used to ‘colour/decorate’ the pictures (e.g. dhal or rice grains), teacher sourced posters, signs and other visual media texts, chart (to build during activity #5, digital camera, computer/television

 

Assessment:

·         Observation: Teacher observes students for ALL activities and will decide which activities will be directly assessed and recorded and which would not. Simple observation tools as checklists and rubrics may be used; anecdotal notes (Anecdotal comments may be recorded on post-it notes and then affixed to a large chart that lists the students and the days of the week. At the end of the week, the recorded information is transferred to each student’s file and the chart is reused the following week.)

 

·         Conversation: Teacher listens carefully to students’ use of language and contributions during discussions. Conversation in the form of presentations can be assessed by a simple teacher-made rubric. It is important to note that students are not ‘corrected’ or asked to speak ‘better’ if they speak in Creole.

·         Product: Drama piece – simple checklist, picture activity – to be displayed, categorized pictures – chart to be put up in the class, taking still shots – four point checklist/rubric.

   

 


 

  UNIT 1: Activities Around Me

Learning Plan: 3 of 6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Learn, Play, Work

Duration: ½ day

Topic:  “Activities that take a long/short time”           

Context:

Youngsters are always engaged in some activity whether it’s while learning, for play and entertainment or to achieve a specific goal. Looking at the duration of the activities in the three mentioned contexts is a good starting point to introduce children to the concept of time, beginning with how ‘long’ or ‘short’ an activity may take to complete. This Learning Plan introduces this core concept of time, using experiences and activities that are real and fun.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

  • Categorize activities according to the length of time taken to complete – “short/long time”.
  • Read text with appropriate pronunciation and fluency.
  • Sequence pictures based on the order presented in a story.
  • Work cooperatively and respectfully in group activities and tasks.
  • Dramatize simple actions and activities normally engaged in while learning, playing and working.
  • Assist their teacher in creating a photo story using pictures of themselves.
  • Sing a simple composed song to a known tune with accuracy.

Activities:

1.    Concept formation: “short time” and “long time”. Teacher engages students in simple simulated activities to establish the duration of a “short/long time”; activities may include, brushing their teeth, eating breakfast, getting dresses, writing, singing the National Anthem, saying school prayer, playing certain games including video games, performing chores (sweeping the yard, washing the car, bathing the dog) etc.

Students can suggest other activities that they do which they feel takes a “short/long time” to complete – everyone discusses. Pictures depicting these activities may be used.

 

2.    Story: Teacher created text or online text (found online, e-book, DVD etc) that tells of the activities of a five year old child, like themselves, from morning to night time. Text should include words, sentences and colourful pictures depicting each activity the character performs for the day. As text is read (teacher to decide how it is done), students listen so they may select the correct picture of the ‘present’ activity told of in the story (pictures were initially mixed up and laid out to the front of the class). Students re-organise the pictures, they read the caption also – other students agree/disagree with sequence choice/picture selection. (No more than 8 – 10 pictures are used unless the class can manage more.)

3.    Discussion and survey: After the story, students review new sequence of picture cards with activities; ALL students have ‘survey cards’ which they use to say if an activity can be categorized as one that takes a “short/long time”. There may be times, when an activity may take someone a “short time” while it may take another a “long time” – this is considered too, especially in the content of differently abled children and people.

4.    Survey Cards:

    
   
  
 

 

 


The length of the card can reflect the concept also.

 

5.    Categorizing chart (T-Chart): Activities used here are from the story – the pictures with captions.

 

Things that take a

short time

Things that take a

 long time

           

 

It takes a short time to brush my teeth.

 

It takes me a long time to wash the car.

 

6.    Teacher guided drama/mime activity: students demonstrate the activities they are regularly involved in at school (learning and playing) and working (adult jobs included). Students guess the type of activity and whether it is associated with ‘learning, playing or working’.

7.    Assist in creating a photo story: teacher uses pictures taken during the activities to create a photo story with the students. Pictures should depict the activities discussed and dramatized during the learning exercise.

8.    Singing: Teacher composed a song from a known tune to differentiate between activities that take a ‘short/long time’ to complete.

9.    Extension: Teacher can decide to teach more difficult concepts as “more/less time”, “longer/shorter time” when comparing time taken to complete activities previously discussed. For example,

 

·         “Does it take “more/less time” to wash the car or brush your teeth?”

·         Brushing your teeth takes a “longer/shorter time”.

Home Activity: children are to get help to list additional activities which they believe take them a “short/long time” to complete. They organize ideas on a T-Chart like the one used for the Learning Plan. Students can use pictures on their chart.

Resources:

  Pictures of children engaged in regular activities while learning, playing and working, story, pictures related to activities from the story, ‘short/long time’ cards for every student, T-chart to be developed during the activity, computer with Photo Story software; individual T-charts for students to take home for ‘Home Activity’.

Assessment:

  • Observations: Teacher checklist re: cooperative and respectful behaviours.
  • Time scale: Students are given a few pictures (about 5) to place on a time scale from “short time” to “long time”. This is a higher order activity.

short time                                                                              long time

 

·         Conversations: Cards with different activities the children so while at school and at home (learning, playing and working) are distributed either all at once before the activity OR individually just before they speak. Student stands on the class ‘stage’ (a special elevated area in the class) to speak about the activity on the card. Activities should be ones that were discussed before and/or familiar to the students’ experiences. Teacher prompts and guides with questions to elicit time vocabulary.

   

 

  UNIT 1: Activities Around Me

Learning Plan: 4 of  6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Learn, Play, Work

Duration:  Half day

Topic:  Disaster Preparedness – Hurricanes and Floods

Context:

This Learning Plan considers the activities and people involved in preparedness for a hurricane or flood. The third term coincides with the rainy season so the learning plan is well-timed. Additionally, it has become increasingly important for everyone, including five year olds, to become disaster ready especially with the changing weather patterns and the severity of extreme weather conditions and their effects on life. This learning plan offers a range of learning points that will assist young citizens to protect themselves, those around them and the things they regard as important.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☐Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☒Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

  1. state their understanding of the term ‘disaster’

(“when something bad happens around us…a sudden accident that causes damage to people and things around us)

  1. read and comprehend age appropriate materials relating to hurricanes and flooding

(materials may include: poems, stories, short passages from newspapers, etc. about hurricane experiences in Trinidad and  Tobago, the effects of a hurricane/flood, the perspective of a child/animal/object who experienced a hurricane/flood etc.)

  1. dramatize using role play or mime and simple props, activities and actions organized and/or performed by persons and/or organisations involved in disaster preparedness related to a hurricane or flood. (fireman/firewoman, policeman/policewoman, nurses and doctors, volunteers, hospitals, Office of Disaster Preparedness and Management (ODPM),  Tobago Emergency Management Agency (TEMA)
  2. engage in role play to make an emergency phone call to someone who can offer assistance during a hurricane or flooding situation (family member, adult, relevant authority, police etc.)
  3. capture still shots using a simple digital camera.

Activities:

1.    Students look at a video clip which shows the destruction sometimes associated with a hurricane or a flood AND/OR; students show and tell about pictures they were asked to source (perhaps as a homework activity) – still images of: a hurricane in motion, flooding or the effects of these two natural disasters on people and the environment. Students use skills taught in Oral Communication for responding to audio-visual stimulus and for ‘Show and Tell’ activity. This activity should achieve outcome #1 – students’ understanding of the term ‘disaster’.

 

     Suggestions:

     Diego Martin flood of 2012

     Hurricane Ivan in Grenada 2004

     Hurricane Gilbert in Jamaica 1988

     Hurricane Flora in  Tobago September 30th 1963

 

 

2.    Students will interact (read, discuss, explain, debate, explore etc.) with a range of selected reading materials (informational and fictional, found or created) and media texts (posters, fliers, advertisements, stickers, slogans) relating to hurricanes and floods. They read or are read to, ask and respond to questions, express ideas etc. in an oral comprehension exercise.

       (This activity should be guided by the ‘Oral Communication’, ‘Reading  

       Literacy’ and ‘Media and Information Literacy’ ELA documents.)

 

3.    Students view selected audio-video clips (and/or a teacher-created photo story with ‘hurricane sounds effects’ in the background) which effectively show disaster situations before, during and/or after a hurricane or flood (teacher can select) where persons who assist with disaster preparedness and relief are performing their duties. Students’ discussions during the viewing/listening activity are teacher guided where the teacher elicits ideas on the persons involved in assisting with a hurricane or flood, the activities that they perform, the importance of their services etc.

 

4.    (a.) Students are prepared by either teaching them or reminding them about using a digital camera to capture still shots. Students are lead through a practice activity with the camera. (The length and depth of this activity depends on the children’s exposure to and success with the camera.)

 

(b.) Students use the experiences of Activity #3 to inform their role play/mime/performance. Students are provided with simple items as ‘props’ (Suggestions: fire helmet, piece of water hose, policeman badge, doctor’s/nurse’s white coat, first aid kit and many other items which students may have seen in the activity #3 above.)  Teacher may demonstrate what is expected in the performance; students then perform either individually or in groups– still shots are captured by students with teacher’s guidance. Non-performers narrate through the performance; they discuss each performance with guide questions from the teacher. Everyone gets a chance to perform and capture at least one still shot (pictures are viewed at a later time.) Students are guided to maximize the opportunity to become confident, proud, creative, to practice oral communication skills when responding to performances and use of modern technology.

 

5.    Students would already understand the need to call for help in crisis 

       situations and ‘basics’ of using a phone: at school- a parent/guardian, at  

       home: the police station, fire station, the neighbour, a relative or friend.

       Students are reminded of what they saw and talked about in Activities #1, 3

       and #4 b, to get the idea of calling someone for help when in trouble.

       Students are presented with large posters with pictures/illustrations and the

       phone number to call when in trouble/need of help. These posters can be

       stuck in the classroom or in a central location in the corridors. Teacher

       demonstrates and thoroughly explains how they would use the phone to call

       for help and what they would say (possible questions and answers during the

       call). Students also simulate with the teacher acting as the person who is

       called. (This is a good opportunity to teach students how to role play with a

       phone ; when ‘talking’, there should be NO eye-contact with two parties

       because it compromises the reality of the scene. Both persons should be

       sufficiently apart but audible to each other and to the others. It comes with

       lots of practice.) This activity can be VIDEO RECORDED for play back. 

       (Students would LOVE to look at their performance, and it would be another

       opportunity for them to reinforce the concepts.)

 

(Fire truck/fire officers putting out a fire – 990; police station/officer/car – 999; ambulance/nurse/doctor/hospital – village Health Centre number etc.)

Resources:

·         Video clips, newspaper/internet pictures (with/without captions), teacher-made photo story (suggested), reading texts (passages, stories, poems), media texts (posters, fliers, slogans), simple props associated with persons who assist with hurricane and flooding disasters, a simple digital camera, cell phone or land line phone, teacher checklists.

Assessment:

·         Observation: Teacher checklist for: oral communication skills, cooperation with peers, use of the camera and mime/role play performance.  (teacher decides in which activity she/he wants to use checklist).

·         Conversation: Show and Tell exercise with pictures, most activities involve teacher-student/student-student communication and sharing; the teacher can use these as opportunities to extend students’ ideas by careful questioning.

·         Product: Still shots (class can look at pictures at a later time to evaluate them based on simple criteria), performance (a checklist or simple rubric OR student feedback can act as the evaluation).

 

   

 


 

  UNIT 1: Activities Around Me

Learning Plan: 5 of 6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Learn, Play, Work

Duration:  Half day

Topic:  Getting Ready for the Hurricane/Flood         

Context:

Children are bombarded with messages from the wide range of media available including: radio, internet, posters and television. As educators, we are responsible for not only ensuring our young learners are able to interpret messages they receive, but also able to get a message across using traditional and modern technology. Additionally, even five year olds need to be responsible for their safety, in this case, with regard to hurricane and flooding – two common concerns for Trinidad and  Tobago during June to November.

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

1.    create a large poster or sign informing others of important considerations during the hurricane season or when preparing for a hurricane/flood

2.    list in a logical sequence, with justifications, the necessary steps taken to prepare for a hurricane or flood

3.    express themselves both orally and in guided writing activities:

  1. their feelings on a pending/post disaster, and 
  2. preparation activities before, during and after a hurricane/flood

4.    create and present (teacher to select) a weather bulletin, advertisement, simple picture story and reflection based on pre- and post- hurricane/flooding information and experiences

5.    read, memorize and recite r. inwards’ poem, individually and in groups, with attention to basic pronunciation and enunciation skills, for familiar audiences.

Activities:

1.    Students look at a previously seen video clip/pictures/performances etc. that would get them thinking about the important things to be done to prepare for a hurricane and major flooding. Discussions should elicit ideas which are noted, teacher-sourced pictures with captions (simple sentences or words) are used to stimulate discussions. Students work in groups with pictures from the teacher. Students are guided to colour and arrange pictures to create a media text (poster or sign) to inform others. The message should tell people of four important steps in getting ready for a hurricane/flooding (teacher to decide the four steps).

 

2.    Groups present with guidance, the media text they create. They field questions from teacher and classmates and explain, defend; justify their piece of work as regards sequence of pictures, colours used etc. At the end of every presentation, students are to re-emphasize their steps to prepare for the disaster.

 

3.    News reporter: Teacher demonstrates the activity – News Reporter who is interviewing people about how they have prepared for the hurricane/flood, how they feel, who they would call on to help them if they are in trouble (previous LA), AND/OR how they were affected by a hurricane/flood. (Teacher can incorporate activities before, during and after the disaster.) A mike and pretend video camera or small digital camera is used for the ‘interviews’. Interviews are video recorded with a digital camera for play back and discussion.

 

4.    Students use the following as stimuli to create: a radio weather bulletin, newspaper advertisements, existing or teacher-created poems and stories. Students use the stimuli (not all at once, teacher selects) as an example to create their own media text.

a.   Weather bulletin: to be written, narrated and voice recorded for play.

b.   Advertisements: to be created for any product/item that would promise to help in a hurricane/flood, for example, a water proof cell phone – the ideas are many.

c.   Poems and stories: may use pictures/illustrations alone or pictures and words to give the experience/perspective of the ‘other’ with regard to hurricanes/floods, for instance, the perspective from a lost pet, favourite toy or floating car – again , the ideas are many.

 

5.    Students are presented with a large, colourful, well-illustrated version of R. Inwards 1988 poem. Additionally, they are presented with text that has written “Hurricane time: June 1st to November 30th”. Students read, re-read and recite the short poem for performances in their class, other classes and perhaps morning assembly. Performances are video recorded using a digital camera. Opportunities for students’ reflections, oral and scribal (words and drawings) should be created.

Resources:

·         R. Inwards 1988 poem:

June – too soon

July – stand by!

August – look out you must.

September – remember

October – all over. (“almost over” – can be used since weather patterns have changed and there have been hurricanes in October.)

Assessment:

·         Observation:

·         Conversation:

·         Product:

 

   

 

 

  UNIT 1: Activities Around Me

Learning Plan: 6 of 6

Class: Infants Year 1    

Theme:  Learn, Play, Work

Duration:  30 minutes for EACH Read-a-Thon session 

Topic:  Mini Read-a-Thon

Context:

This learning plan provides an outline of a mini read-a-thon which can be organized within the individual class or for the Infant one level. The read-a-thon would provide students with a formal ‘stage’ where they can: use the Oral Communication and Reading skills they’ve learnt, interact with different genres of literature, gain confidence, develop talents, make themselves, teacher and parents proud and, have fun! The teacher is to decide how many 30 minute sessions she/he would like.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

  • Read accurately, high frequency words with automaticity.
  • Use picture clues to infer the meaning of words.
  • Recognize familiar vocabulary explicitly taught in a variety of contexts to promote understanding of texts.
  • Use correct pronunciation; clear enunciation, intonation, rhythm, pace expression and phrasing to read aloud fluently.
  • Participate in the selection of literature based on interest.
  • Engage in readings from various genres.
  • Share feelings and thoughts with peers and adults about the texts experienced (read or heard), orally and/or through journal entries.
  • Answer questions orally and in writing based on materials/texts experienced.
  • Make text-to-self connections with materials/texts experienced.
  • Know to use common courtesies when interacting with familiar audiences.
  • Engage in discussions, ask and respond to questions based on materials/texts experienced.

Activities:

The following activities provide a general overview of how the teacher can organize the Read-a-thon; the main thing, is to ensure that the stated outcomes are achieved at the end of the activity.

 

1.    Pre Read-a-Thon Activities

·         Selection of reading materials from genres to be available to students (books from home and school, NALIS books (a special arrangement can be made for the project), informational texts, downloaded books and materials, perhaps a school-wide drive for books. Please note that the materials selected should be related to the Theme: Learn, Play, Work and all subject/content areas as much as possible. However, do not limit materials they cannot be found.

·         Class wide, throughout Infant level/levels, competitive or participatory, certificates and other rewards.

·         When will sessions be held during the regular day’s schedule?

·         How long will students have the material to become comfortable with it? Will there be sessions where the material will be presented only prior to the reading, say, 15 minutes before?

 

2.    A Read-a-Thon Session

·         Duration: approximately 30 minutes.

·         A selected, manageable number of students per session.

·         Scoring/assessment tool: perhaps designed so that it helps the student to improve his/her reading; scores sheet can be placed in portfolio/student file.

·         Scoring should be objective and if possible, done by more than one knowledgeable person.

·         Depending on the students’ confidence, teachers would keep the reading either more or less formal, for instance, having a ‘stage’ from which they would read.

·         Teacher to decide if there would be a ‘Q & A’ of the material read.

 

Resources:

·         Materials to read, assessment tool,

·         Rewards for participants (certificates, tokens etc.),

·         recording equipment (digital camera or voice recorder)

·         Digital camera to photograph students.

 

Assessment:

 Guide checklist. Different areas of assessment can be sub-divided into a point rubric or ‘Consistently, Sometimes, Never’ scale (Teacher to decide).

*The 11 stated outcomes above can be components of the assessment tool to ensure that these skills are displayed by every student.

 

Student’s Name

Title of material

Appropriate

pronunciation

Miscues

Decoding skills

Use of vocabulary knowledge

 

 

*This can be sub-divided into the various skills:

-volume

-expression etc.

 

 

*This can be sub-divided into various skills.

 

 

 

 

   

 

Unit 2 Do You Want to Play

Learning Unit 2: Learning, Working and Playing Together

 

Class: Infant 1                 Theme:  Learn, Play, Work              Estimated frame: 10 days

Context:

Play is an innate ability used for learning about the world. Children frequently form groups when playing in order to participate and compete. Within the context of play they develop important life skills as they work cooperatively with each other and practice healthy habits including exercising safety, extending courtesies, adapting to change and building relationships.

On a regular basis in school we see children fighting over silly things. One reason for this, and one we may not realize, is that children are not born with a team mentality. Many of them do not have the appropriate social skills because they have not had appropriate models and no one has actually taught them how to handle social situations. Many children may not know how to get along with one another or how to solve a conflict when it occurs.

Conflicts are a normal part of life – we do not want children NOT to have conflicts and respond with aggression; we want children to be comfortable, confident and assertive.

Participating in team building activities can help students feel like they belong to a group. They learn how to communicate, how to co-operate and how to be a team member.

 

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

1.    demonstrate an understanding of basic loco motor and axial movement

2.    count objects to demonstrate one-to-one correspondence (up to 10)

3.    associate add-one and subtract-one facts to forward and backward counting.

4.    develop vocabulary when describing length and activities associated with time

5.    manage change and build relationships.

6.    demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening etiquette and non-verbal communication skills.

7.    display and extend courtesies while interacting with others, and answer in Spanish

8.    recognize that working and playing safely protects everyone and prevents injury

9.    distinguish between types of forces as pulls or pushes.

10.  explore different ways of saying ‘yes’ and ‘no’ in Spanish and other selected languages

11.  demonstrate techniques in creating media

12.  identify that the human body is made up of several parts

 

Learning Plans:

1.    Do you want to Play?

2.    This is the way we keep our Rules!

3.    A Recipe for Safety.

4.    Play Safe, Be Safe!

5.    Moving Safely

 

Resources:

·         Balls – rubber or sponge (approximately 20 cm.);

·         Carpet squares (mats, drawing of space, or any other substitute can work);

·         CD player with music (teacher’s choice); Bristol board (for poster); pictures (from magazines, internet, etc.) words to song (Head and Shoulders);

·         Glitter pens/coloured pencils/markers, glue, scissors, tape, rope, toys with wheels

 

 

Assessment:

Formative:

  • Students’ interaction during games (how co-operation, team spirit, courtesies, safety, listening etiquette was shown).
  • Teacher’s observations and discussions with students.
  • Assess how students move during activities – loco motor and axial movements.
  • Students describe forces as a push or a pull.

Summative:

  • In small groups students create a poster to show a class or school rule.
  • Elements of the poster – creativity, relevant elements to show a rule

 

 

UNIT 2: “Working as a Team”

Learning Plan: 1 of 5

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Learn, Play, Work     

Duration: 1 day

Topic:  Do you want to play?

 

Context: Team building activities are a fun way to teach children leadership, communication, decision-making and problem solving skills. To succeed at team building games children have to learn to work together, communicate clearly, listen carefully and think creatively. They will learn this through their innate desire to play.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☐Media & Information Literacy

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☐Representation

☒Reasoning

ICT Skills

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         show co-operation with their class mates

·         estimate the duration of activities

·         assess the importance of the observable parts of the body- hands and fingers

·         perform basic loco motor and non-loco motor movement in play

·         answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’ in another language

·         count forward and backward using objects

·         solve simple addition and subtraction problems.

Activities:
Ants in a Line: Children pretend to be ants in this game. The goal is to have each ant (child) move the pebbles (balls) blocking their path to an anthill from one end of the room to the other (see instructions in appendix #1).

 

This game can be done on the playground or in an activity room in the school.

1.    First, explain to the class how the activity has to be done.

2.    Announce the winning group after the task is completed.

3.    Discussion – talk about the process the students engaged in during the game e.g. working alone the task could not be done; with friends the task was completed. The objective of this activity is to show students that working with others can get a job done quickly and effectively, rather than working on their own. During discussions emphasize cooperation, listening, communication and problem solving.

4.    With reference to the chart, question students on time activities – working alone (long time/short time); working together (long time/short time).

5.    Wherever the students have to use the words ‘yes’ and ‘no’ encourage the use of another language (they may also count the number of objects in the anthill in Spanish).

6.    Children are provided with sock to place on hand and they try to pick up various objects of different shapes and sizes.

7.    The importance of fingers is discussed based on the students’ observations.

8.    Teacher asks students to demonstrate basic loco motor movement (moving with feet) and non-loco motor movement (standing on the spot) that was used to get the objects into the anthill.

9.    Students repeat movements with use of only one hand or foot and compare how effective they were.

10.  Teachers lead students in a discussion of the importance of having TWO limbs for balance, speed, dexterity and strength.

11.  Students should discuss the challenges experienced by those who are physically disabled or handicapped and suggest ways they can be of assistance.

(Students who are having some problems with psychomotor skills can take their time. The idea here is to bring out co-operation and encourage basic loco motor movement.)

Follow with the second activity to reinforce “team work” (co-operation, helping each other, etc.)

 

Frogs on a Lily Pad

12.  Students are placed in 4/5 groups of equal number of members which are identified by labels of numbers written in Spanish.

13.  Teacher explains the game “Frogs on a Lily Pad” as described in the appendix #1 before the play it.

14.  During the game, teacher stops the music and engages students in solving simple addition and subtraction problems. E.g. how many lily pads are left when one was removed (subtraction); how many children were one a lily pad before and after the music stopped (addition).

 During the game let students work out on their own how they are going to help each other on to a lily pad. For the children with problems in psychomotor skills, as the teacher, help them along. Encourage other students to help them as well. Question students on what it means to have team work.

 

Resources:

·         Rubber/sponge balls (approx. 20 cm.); CD player and music; lily pads (carpet squares, mats, squares drawn on the ground, etc., about 18” x 18” can work as a substitute); chalk (optional)

Assessment:

·         Teacher’s observations on how students cooperated during the games.

·         Students’ ability to answer “yes” or “no” or count in Spanish or another language.

·         Students’ responses to the meaning of team work.

·         Completion of mathematics worksheet, appendix #2.

 

   

 

 

 

UNIT 2: LEARNING Plan 1 of 5- APPENDIX #1.

Ants in a Line: Rules and Instructions.

RULES:

  • Objects cannot be placed in a vessel or pocket but must be held in student’s hand.
  • Any object that falls from student’s hand must be left behind.
  • 1 point is given for the numbers of objects safely placed in the anthill and points equal to each group’s placement according to least time taken to complete the task (the last place receives 1 point and each place higher gets one more point than the previous group) are awarded.
  • The winning team is the one receiving the greatest number of points in the second try.

 

Instructions:

  1. Place students into groups of equal members.
  2. Using masking tape create a path from one end of the activity space to an anthill (a basket label accordingly).
  3. Label (1, 2, 3, 4….) objects (balls, lego blocks, lemons etc) so that there is one for each group member.
  4. Place objects at various points along the path and have one member of each group take turns to collect all the objects in one trip to the anthill. Note the time taken by having all the other students count out the number of seconds needed or using a stopwatch. Teacher records the number of objects retrieved and time taken by each group in their first try on a chart.
  5. Each group gets another try at the task but this time can use a relay system where the first group member goes to base one, picks up the object and takes it to the anthill. When he/she reaches the next team mate moved to second base, picks up object and heads to anthill, then the third….
  6. Again, the number of objects in the anthill/basket and time taken is recorded by the counting of other groups.

 

Frogs on a Lily Pad: Instructions.

  1. Set up 1 lily pad (carpet squares work) for each child
  2. Start the music and ask the kids to walk around like musical chairs
  3. When the music stops pick a pad to leap too
  4. Start the music again, but remove a lily pad each time
  5. Each time the music stops everyone should work together to find a lily pad to be on
  6. As long as part of their body is touching the lily pad the “frog” is safe
  7. No matter how many frogs end up each pad they need to work together to make room for all
  8. As you continue playing have the frogs leap, skip, hop, and “swim” to the music.
  9. When the music stops, how few pads can people manage to fit on if they work cooperatively?

 

 

 

 

UNIT 2: LEARNING Plan 1 of 5- APPENDIX #2

 

Count  forward

Write in the missing numbers.

 

1      2     3     __     5     __     7     __     __     10

 

Solve the problems:

  6           +       3 =  __                    2      +      7 = __

                       

                     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

      

9    –  5  =                                    10   –   8   =

                         

                            

                                                 

 

     

 


UNIT 2: Learning Playing and Working Together

Learning Plan: 2 of 5

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:   Learn, Play, Work     

Duration:    1 day      

Topic:  This is the way we keep our Rules!

Context:

Rules are important to children. Rules help to keep them safe; teach them how to function at home and at school. One of the best ways to get students to understand and keep rules is to get them involved in developing some of their own rules.

CONSIDERATIONS:

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         justify the need for rules

·         develop simple rules for management of class and school

·         demonstrate simple hygienic and safety practices/rules

·         sequence rules in numerical order (up to 10)

·         generate ideas to create a poster for class

·         use different techniques to design a poster showing a rule

·         read rules and practice while at school

·         extend simple courtesies, such as “please” and “thank you”, while interacting with others

·         answer simple courtesies in Spanish

·         answer “yes” or “no” in Spanish

·         write neatly and legibly lower and upper case letters.

Activities:

Teaching Classroom Rules

Before the activity engage in a discussion about rules: what a rule is and why we have rules.

1.    Students divided into groups of five; each group has a specific topic (illustrated accordingly) to dramatize the correct and incorrect behaviour or actions at various events of a typical day:

·         Group 1- lesson time (listening, putting up hands, speaking in turn)

·         Group 2 – play time (sharing, manners, safety)

·         Group 3 – meal time (washing hands, disposal of waste, speaking softly)

·         Group 4 – home time (waiting in school, packing up)

·         Group 5 – assembly (lining up, walking)

 

2.    Class discussions after scenarios were acted out: feedback from students to identify why behaviours or actions were inappropriate and why the correct approach is necessary.

After the activity, discuss behaviours that are acceptable and behaviours that are not acceptable. You can also relate this to the importance of respecting each other.

 

3.    Discussion: what is a rule; why should we have rules. Relate rules to acceptable and unacceptable behaviours that came out in the scenarios.

4.    Students develop rules they can follow in class (oral activity or log).

5.    Answer “yes” or “no” in Spanish to behaviours.

 

Follow the Leader (to be done out of the classroom)

6.    Name a leader, have that child lead the other children around the school.

7.    If the leader does anything that’s unsafe e.g. running along the corridor, stop the game.

8.     Have them tell you why they can’t do that and pick a new leader.

9.    The students sing a song “Here we go ‘round our school” (see accompanying CD) while they play the game.

10.  Add to the rules list.

11.  Discussion: why we have rules; what would happen if there were no rules.

12.  List of rules created to follow in class and in school. Students state the numerical order of the rules e.g. 1, 2, 3, …

13.  Students categorize the rules into ‘classroom rules’ and ‘school rules’.

14.  Students read the list of rules.

15.  Students read another list comprising rules and non-rules.

16.  They answer “yes” or “no” in Spanish to whether it is a rule or not.

Creating a Poster

17.  Class discussion to generate ideas on the poster e.g. the rule to be used, technique (drawing, collage, etc.).

18.  Using the template (see accompanying CD) students create their own poster.

Resources:

·         Song (Here we go ‘round our class and school); picture to colour; template for poster; list of rules and non-rules; crayons, reason for rules worksheet, magazines, computer for internet access

·         Classroom rules template:

Searches for websites can be done using key words “kinder polka dot patch classroom rules” or “pre kinders class rules”  

 

Assessment:

·         Organize rules into “Class rules” and “School rules”.

·         Answer “yes” or “no” in Spanish

·         Design a poster to explain a class or school rule.

·         Colour a picture, trace, write and read the words written.

·         Match rules to the reason for the rule.(see attached)

·         Number the rules in sequence and write the corresponding number of the rule to the reason for the rule.

   

 

 

 

UNIT 2 – Learning Plan 2

Match the rules to the reason.

Put your hand up.

Keep a clean and healthy space

Share school property

Prevent accidents.

Place garbage in bin

All enjoy the fun.

Listen carefully

All will get a turn.

Walk not run

All should be heard

UNIT 2 – Activity 2

Design a poster to explain a class rule.

Rule:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why we have the rule.

 

 

 

 

 

UNIT 2 – Activity 2

UNIT 2 – LEARNING ACTIVITY 2 of 5

 

Song: sung to the tune “Here we go ‘round the Mulberry Bush”.

Here we go ‘round our class and school

Class and school (2 times)

Here we go round our class and school

On a bright and sunny day.

 

This is the way we walk to the taps

Walk to the taps, walk to the taps

This is the way we walk to the taps

On a bright and sunny day.

 

(Continue the song creating your own verses based on your school rules).


UNIT 2: Learning Playing and Working Together

Learning Plan: 3 of 5

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:   Learn, Play, Work     

Duration:   Half day

Topic:  A Recipe for Safety   

Context:

Children are generally unaware of situations in their homes that can be potentially dangerous for them. They also may not know why these situations can be dangerous. It is therefore important to identify some of these basic situations, explain why it is dangerous and how they can keep themselves safe.

CONSIDERATIONS:

HFLE

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

ICT Skills

Differentiated Instruction

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         assess the importance of sensory organs

·         dramatize unsafe conditions at home

·         classify safe and unsafe conditions at home

·         discuss the care and protection of eyes and ears

·         develop a set of safety rules they can follow using sentence strips that begin with either always or never

·         individually read the rules they developed

·         write neatly and legibly lower and upper case letters

·         sound common consonant blends (one or more from st, ck, pl, sh )

·         generate ideas to create a chart for class

 

Activities:

Home Safety List

Rules created in Learning Plan 2 can be used as a stepping stone here.

1.    Students sing song “Toe, knee, chest, …” and discuss the importance of the sensory organs mentioned.

2.    Initiate a discussion with the students about personal safety at home (or view video resource). List these, pointing out those that affect eyes and ears (sharp objects, swabs, loud noise, intense light.)

3.    Students examine and discuss a picture depicting a safe and unsafe kitchen.

4.     Students cross out the unsafe items in the first picture and number each. They circle the safe items in the second picture and number each to match the danger in the first picture that is avoided.

5.    Students give reasons why an item is safe or unsafe.

6.    Using digital camera or phone, students take pictures under teacher’s supervision, of unsafe places or events in school similar to that found at home. These are discussed them viewing on the multimedia or prints.

7.    Students develop their own set of safety rules for home using ALWAYS or NEVER as the beginning word for each sentence strip (eg NEVER run in the kitchen, ALWAYS wash hands before eating…).

Safety Rules

8.    Students discuss clip-art (can be shown from the multimedia).

9.    They read the safety rule for each drawing, emphasizing the consonant blends which the teacher circles or underlines.

10.  Students then pick a rule, read it and say why it is important to them.

11.  Students write down the list of rules and use these to create a chart for class.

 

Resources:

“Get cooking” activity page; crayons.

Pictures: Search on the internet key word “sparkle box” to get suitable pictures

Safety on Road, at school and home:  Search on the internet for suitable youtube videos.

 

Assessment:

·         Using a picture, students write “X” on the unsafe situations and “circle” the safe situations in a home.

·         Student complete blank spaces in the song “A SAFETY SONG” (see attached) with appropriate consonant blend (teacher can adapt to suit blends being assessed).

·         Students explain what makes some situations unsafe.

·         Students develop and read a set of home safety rules.

·         Students create a chart for the classroom.

   

 

 

 

 

UNIT 2 – Activity 3

Cross out everything that is unsafe.

 

 

 

 

 

Circle everything you see that is safe.

 

                                                   

UNIT 2 – Learning Plan 3

 

                                                                                                                                                      

NEVER play with candles.

 

  NEVER play with matches.

 

UNIT 2 – Activity 3

 

 

NEVER place objects in electrical sockets.

 

 

                                                                               

 

ALWAYS crawl on the floor when escaping a fire.

 

 

 

A SAFETY SONG

(Tune: The wheels on the bus go round and round)

Children like to ru _ _ to pl _ _, ru _ _  to pl _ _, ru _ _  to pl _ _,

Children like to ru_ _ to pl_ _

All day long.

 

It’s unsafe to pu_ _ and _ _ove, pu_ _ and _ _ove, pu_ _ and _ _ove

It’s unsafe to pu_ _ and _ _ove

All day long.

 

Wa _ _ your hands before you e _ _, before you e _ _, before you e_ _

Wa _ _ your hands before you e _ _

All day long.

 

Do not throw _ _ icks and _ _ ones,  _ _ icks and _ _ ones , _ _ icks and _ _ ones

Do not throw _ _ icks and _ _ ones

All day long.

 

We always pi_ _ up our toys, pi_ _ up our toys, pi_ _ up our toys

We always pi_ _ up our toys

All day long.

 

We pl _ _ safely and have more fun, have more fun, have more fun

We pl _ _ safely and have more fun

All day long.
Song: “Toe, knee, chest…. “

 

Toe, (point to toes)

 Knee, (point to knees)

Chest, (point to chest)

 Nut, (point to head)

Nose.  (point to nose)

Eye love him (point to eye then heart)

Yes, he nose

Toe

Knee

Nose

Toe,

 Knee,

Chest,

 Nut,

Nose.

Eye love him

That’s what

Toe

Knee

Nose.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNIT 2: Learning Playing and Working Together

Learning Plan: 4 of 5

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:   Learn, Play, Work                     

Duration:        1 day

Topic:  Play Safe, Be Safe!   

Context:

Students are now aware of safety measures at home and of situations that can be unsafe. However, when children are together at school they can engage activities in play which can lead to dangerous situations. Children therefore also need to learn about their personal safety and ensure that of their peers as well as understand the consequences of their actions. One of the best ways to teach this to children is through song and play.

CONSIDERATIONS:

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☐Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☐Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         Identify certain parts of their body and its functions.

·         Develop a set of safety rules they can follow.

·         Learn and experience safe play concepts through music.

·         Dance and explore body movement through improvised dance and action song.

·         Talk about safe and unsafe situations as they arise in the classroom.

·         Discuss ways to be safe.

 

Activities:

School Safety List

Rules created in Learning Plan 2 can be used as a stepping stone here.

  

Outside Activity

1.    Warm up – Students dance and sing to the song “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes”.

2.    Students identify their limbs and discuss their function while engaging in a range of movements: side-side at neck, rolling arms about shoulder, bending of knees, up and down movement of arms, to and fro movement of legs).

3.    Students repeat the song at different tempo and simultaneously move limbs appropriately really slow, faster, slower and really fast.

 

In Classroom

4.    Students are grouped and each plan and demonstrate a situation in school that can result in injury of selected part of the body (a box containing names/pictures of parts are circulated).

5.    A chart of “Actions and Consequences” is produced using drawings provided by each group or pictures or viewing of video taken during previous dramatic presentations

6.    Before going to a designated play area they create a “safe play” list together based on their chart. The key to getting children to follow safety rules is to involve them in the planning process and emphasize the consequences.

7.    Ask students what are some important safety rules for play e.g. “Can Do” and “Cannot Do”. Encourage rules they can follow:

–          Can share or take turns

–          Cannot push or shove

8.    Discuss having fun in a safe way and without accidents and have students suggest reasonable sanctions for good and poor choices.

9.    Children write their name on a blue ribbon name tag and teacher post up a chart for tracking names of students who were exemplary in their behaviour with a pocket to store the blue ribbons

 

Back to the play area

10.  Teacher and students review the play rules.

11.  Continue with another game of your choice (e.g. with balls, hoops, etc.) and observe the students to see how they incorporated the safety measures they learned.

12.  Teacher plays video of students at play and awards first ribbons.

 

Resources:

·         “Safe Play” rules list, award chart and ribbons; song; camera, video-taping equipment;( see attached)

·         Playground safety for kids: Search on the internet key words “playground safety”. Books can be researches as well.

·         Play safe, Be safe games and activities: Search on the internet key words/phrases  “play safe be safe”

 

Assessment:

·         Students’ dramatization and drawings

·         Students’ demonstration and description of their movements in relation to body parts and function.

·         Students’ contributions to discussions on safe play.

o   Naming of safe play rules for school

o   Naming of an unsafe situation and say how it can be made safe

·         Teacher’s observations of students’ involvement and behaviours.

 

 

 UNIT TWO: Learning Playing and Working Together

Learning Plan: 5 of 5

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:   Learn, Play, Work            

Duration:   1 day       

Topic: “ Moving Safely”         

Context:

Children push and pull at things every day in order to move them from rest, keep them in motion, even change their speed or cause them to come to rest. Such a push or a pull is known as a force and when a force is exerted on an object, it changes its position and motion. Understanding forces is important for children to appreciate the consequences of actions in maintaining a safe environment.

CONSIDERATIONS:

HFLE

 

Literacy

☐Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☐Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☐Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

  • Explore changes in the motion of an object by pushing or pulling.
  • Develop vocabulary for describing changes in motion – near, far, faster, slower, short, long
  • Demonstrate that the greater the force the greater the change in motion.
  • Distinguish between types of forces – as a push or a pull in terms of their effects.

Activities:

 Introducing force

1.    Using pieces of string, rope, cord, etc. (approx. 20 cm.), in pairs students take turns and pull, as though they are playing tug-o-war.

2.    Students explain what caused “John” to win, e.g. pull of one person is more than that of the other. They discuss other possibility, that “John” does not win or that both “tie” as well as safety considerations.

(Alternatively they can be provided with elastic or rubber bands for free play)

3.    Introduce term “force”. Students give examples of when force is used or needed (e.g. close a door, pull a trolley bag, etc.

 Experimentation

4.    Students find their personal space. They use various objects including toys with wheels and explore pushing and pulling, not throwing through game: “Simon Says”- (students follows commands called by a leader which includes pushes, pulls or combinations) and observe toy’s movement.

5.    Students develop their vocabulary skills composing an operational definition of the terms “push” and “pull” with respect to: changes in position and direction of movement.

6.    Students discuss what made the game safe and what could have cause danger.

 

Outside Activity

7.    Students play the game “May I…” (leader instructs on varying distances to be moved by each child in turn: giant/baby steps, bunny hop, frog leap, which can only be executed after asking for permission).

8.    Teacher leads a discussion on ways used to determine distance to be moved ie arbitrary measures of length. They suggest other arbitrary measures for different scenarios posed to them (length of table, width of classroom, height of individual.)

 

Challenge:

 

9.    Students are provided with simple materials to make a toy launcher (see appended samples) which they adjust in order to apply varying forces.

10.  Students predict the effect on the toy by applying varying forces to them with the launcher. They are cautioned about safety and observed to ensure they follow safe practices.

11.  They then proceed to verify their prediction by measuring the distance travelled using an arbitrary measure as previously discussed.

12.  Students further develop their operational definition of force by incorporating words to describe the distance travelled eg – near, far, short, long as well as consideration of changes in speed- slow, fast.

 

Extension activity:

1.    Students create a list of items that require a push or pull or both to operate. The item can be named, drawn or taken a picture of.

This activity can be done while at school and extended for home work, or done for home work.

 

Resources:

Rope/cord/string; assorted objects including toys with wheels; paper and pencil, elastic or rubber bands, craft sticks, balloons, straw, tape camera (optional for photographic finishes).

 

Assessment:

·         Students name everyday objects that require a push and those that require a pull.

·         Students engage in activities and say which activity is a push and which is a pull.

·         Students identify the force needed for some pushes and pulls.

Observation of safety during activities and completion of tasks.

   

 

 

 

 

Toy launchers

 

  1. Air propelled:
  • Attach balloon to straw with rubber band and then tape unto top of toy with open end facing the back.
  • Run string through straw which is fixed across the classroom.
  • Inflate balloon and releases air as toy is placed at start line. (alternatively an inflated balloon can be taped to back of toy with tied end facing back and popped to release the air thus pushing toy forward)
  • Another option which can move on the floor is shown as well.
  1. Pull- back:

         

 

  • Assemble a catapult using two rubber bands attached to a piece of cardboard or fabric as shown in the picture.
  • Place rubber bands around fixed object on either side so that when toy is place on central piece it can be pulled back and will propel forward on release.

 

Write “push” or “pull” under each picture.    

                     

 

_____________________                                         ________________________

 

 

_____________________               ______________________

 

______________________________

Unit 3 Pattern After Me

Learning Unit 3: Learning, Playing and Working with Patterns

Class: Infants 1        Theme: Learn, Play, Work       

Estimated frame: 3 days

Context

 

 It can be argued that some students see the world holistically and work towards understanding smaller individual parts, while there are others who begin by seeing the parts, relationships among those parts and how they fit together to produce the whole picture.   Identification of symbols and recognition of patterns are some of those ‘individual parts’ which students see and in their own way, factor into them an understanding of the ‘whole’.  Patterns convey important messages where printed text may not be the most effective mode of communication.  As such, patterns are unavoidable and pertinent to students’ everyday lives.  Exploring patterns through play is interesting and motivating as they enhance the development of fundamental knowledge, skills and attitudes that are essential for meaningful learning which finds its niche within the ‘problem-solving’ paradigm as pupils work to resolve authentic, everyday challenges.

 

Outcomes

 

At the end of this learning experience students will:

  1. recognize patterns in the environment
  2. Display patterns created with peers based on physical arrangement of their bodies
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of patterns and sequences through repeat printing and participation in electronic activities
  4. Begin to develop systematic strategies for solving problems and making decisions
  5. Work cooperatively with others

Learning Plans

 

  1. Freeze Pattern!
  2. Plants, Prints, Patterns!
  3. E- Patterns
  4. Repetitions and Problem Solving
  5. A Problem with Trash – A Solution with Patterns

 

Resources

  • Water colours/poster paints in various colours
  • Variety of natural materials such as common stems and fruits,
  • Drawing paper
  • Bristol board
  • Hoops
  • Cones
  • Patterned cloth
  • Paper showing repeat patterns
  • Pictures
  • Coloured pencils and crayons
  • Safety scissors
  • Masking tape
  • Digital camera
  • Printer
  • Computer
  • Internet and/or other digital resources such as educational CDs
  • Disposable gloves
  • Cardboard boxes

 

Assessment:

Facilitator’s observation of:

  • students’ interaction and participation during activities using appropriate observation checklists
  • students’ response to challenges issued for creativity, neatness, accuracy, productivity; oral feedback from teacher
  • students’  ability  to transfer learning to solve similar problems; observation/behaviour checklist 
  • students’ responses in their beginners’ journals
  • students’ selected pieces for inclusion in their scrapbook on theme “Learn, Play, Work” including snapshots capturing different stages in units 1-3

 

 

UNIT 3: Learning, Playing and Working with Patterns

Learning Plan 1 of 5

Class: Infant 1

Theme: Learn, Play, Work           

Time Frame: 2 hours

Topic: Freeze Pattern

Context

 

Patterns exist everywhere in the world. In many cases, patterns are used to convey important messages such as the dashed lines dividing a roadway into lanes or the black and white stripes on a zebra crossing.  Recognizing and interpreting patterns are critical skills young children should develop. Playing and working with patterns sharpen their communication skills and provides a solid conceptual framework for later academic development. As the challenge level of playing and working with patterns increase so to would be their skills in identifying relationships, forming generalizations and solving problems.

Considerations:

 

      HFLE

 

Literacy

☐Reading

☐Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

 

 

 

ICT Skills

 

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

 

Assessment for Learning

 

 

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

 

  • Recognize patterns
  • Arrange themselves to form patterns
  • Represent their ideas in their work
  • Review and evaluate what they and others have done.

 

Activities

 

Recognising Patterns and Non-Patterns

  1. Students are shown examples of simple patterns in the environment such as in arrangement of ventilation blocks in classroom, or the placement of doors and windows of the building or shapes or symbols on cloth or gift paper. Students are asked to discuss their observations of the patterns (elicit from students that patterns are repeated designs)
  2. Identify non-patterns (contains symbols or colours but not logically sequenced) and explain what a pattern is. 
  3. Explore environment to show other examples of patterns.

 

Creating Patterns with our Bodies

  1. Observe carefully as a small group of volunteers (other teachers or older children) demonstrate simple  patterns based on arrangement of (and using) their bodies in varying stances, levels or shapes such as,  one person with arms up while other stoops, third with arms up while fourth person stoops (unit=2 persons). Identify pattern and extend in either direction. Identify and extend patterns in other examples shown (different coloured T-shirts or use of props such as hoops, or wearing hats).
  2. In groups of 5 or 6, using formation of bodies only that is, without the use of props, create simple patterns, each along a line while classmates describe and extend each.
  3. In the rearranged groups (suggested), create other patterns, this time using some of the props provided. When told to do so, display creations while classmates identify patterns made and extend in either direction. Tell groups how they may improve their patterns.
  4. Take part in the game “Freeze Patterns!” In groups of 6, and given about 5 minutes each, decide upon and create simple patterns (with or without props). Pay attention to time to get the pattern made as the final 10 seconds would be loudly counted down to the shout of “Freeze Pattern!” when everyone must ‘freeze’ in their displays.
  5. Evaluate patterns of their peers and make suggestions for improvement.

 

Note:

  • Groups can be rearranged with more advanced learners to produce more complicated patterns or with those a bit more challenged to produce simpler patterns.
  • As far as possible, it is important for the teacher to physically get involved and motivate pupils, create a ‘safe’ environment and carefully observe to assess and give meaningful feedback.
  • Simple warm-up and warm-down exercises can be incorporated.
  • Be mindful of those who are physically challenged and those with chronic diseases such as asthma which can be brought on by even simple movements.

 

Resources:

 

Gift paper and cloth with large enough simple  patterns, coloured T-shirts, simple props such as hoops and cones, older volunteers (could be older kids), access to different parts of the compound to look at patterns on the buildings or in the school garden, observation checklists pupils’ beginners journals, scrap books.

 

 

Assessment:

·         Teacher’s observation of tasks being performed by pupils including transfer of learning (see attached).

·         Students’ responses in their beginner’s journals (see attached).

·         Snapshots of differing stages, and/or drawings of patterns made (simple ‘stick-people’) for inclusion in their scrapbooks.

 

   

 

UNIT 3: Learning, Playing and Working with Patterns

Considerations:

 

      HFLE

 

Literacy

☐Reading

☐Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

 

 

 

ICT Skills

 

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

 

Assessment for Learning

 

 

Learning Plan 2 of 5

Class: Infant 1

Theme: Learn, Play, Work           

Time Frame: 2 hours

Topic: Plants, Prints, Patterns

Context

From words to numbers, to other expressive forms such as music and dance, to the visual arts, sports and the natural sciences patterns are used to help us understand our world and our interactions. However, most of the patterns students would encounter and have to interact with in everyday life exist in printed symbolic forms (not necessarily text). Using basic techniques in repeat printing, and making use of naturally found materials such as banana leaf stems and cross-cut ochroes as stamps for printing, the opportunity for enrichment and remediation of the principal concept of ‘patterns’ emerges. The transition from the physical ‘game’ activity previously used, to the ‘iconic’ mode of learning used in this activity is not only educationally supported but also provides an excellent opportunity for the ‘visual’ learner.

 

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

  • Recognize patterns
  • Create printed patterns using natural plant motifs such as cross-cut stems
  • Represent their ideas in their work

 

Activities

 

Review of Patterns

  1. Review concept of ‘patterns’ by pointing out simple  patterns in some of the resources used in the previous Learning Plan (gift paper, printed cloth, patterns on buildings, small group presentations) as well as in some ‘new’ ones.(examples and non-examples)
  2. Discuss among themselves in their groups to generate a statement explaining what a pattern is (with examples) and share with class.
  3. Listen carefully and suggest improvements to what was said by speakers.
  4. View examples of patterns created on newsprint or brown paper using hand prints of differing coloured poster paints. Identify and explain the patterns being viewed. State pattern rule.

 

Creating Handprint Patterns

  1. On a sheet of newsprint or brown paper create simple  patterns of

members’ hands using paints provided. Post finished products on classroom wall for other groups to observe and comment. Patterns can also be created using solids and plane shapes and numbers – repeating patterns (2or3 elements in the unit of repeat)

 

Creating Patterns using natural materials

  1. View demonstration of a similar process showing patterns being formed using natural materials acquired and poster paints. When called upon, go to the display; choose relevant material and colour to extend pattern being made while rest of class comment.
  2. At each group centre, create individual products (one per member).

 

Creating Patterns in Groups

  1. Students work in groups of four to create one group pattern. They must decide on colours and materials they want to use. Each contributes to the creation of an original, colourful group product and display finished product. Suggest a name for each piece and write this clearly at the top of the piece; help would be provided to aid in spelling. Each write name on the display as having helped to create it.
  2. Students participate in a ‘walk-around’ to view each and make comments.
  3. Suggest a title name for all the pieces made and displayed e.g. ‘Plants, Prints, Patterns!’ or ‘Our Class Pattern Art Gallery/Museum’.

 

Note:

  • Groups can be rearranged with more advanced learners to produce more complicated patterns or with those a bit more challenged to produce simpler patterns individually and as a group.
  • As far as possible, it is important for the teacher to facilitate at all groups and motivate and challenge pupils, create a ‘safe’ environment for sharing and carefully observe to assess and give feedback.
  • Be mindful of all the necessary safety and classroom management implications including: ‘old T-shirts’ or plastic aprons to be worn, wash and wipe hands, control of paint medium, use of disposable gloves, constructive, controlled fun versus ‘clowning-around’, respect for self and property of others and classroom, clean-up responsibilities.

 

Resources:

Gift paper and/or cloth with large enough simple patterns and others printed but with patterns not easily recognizable, old T-shirts or plastic aprons (pupil-provided), simple props such as hoops and cones, poster paints, sanitary saucers, natural cross cut motifs such as ochroes and banana leaf stems and mid-ridge, masking tape, wash cloth and paper towels, drawing sheets, observation checklists, pupils’ beginners journals, scrap books, samples of completed and incomplete work.

 

Assessment:

·         Teacher’s observation of tasks being performed by pupils including transfer of learning (see attached)

·         Students’ responses in their beginner’s journals (instructed and assessed through rubric appended at end of Learning Plan 1)

·         Snapshots of differing stages for inclusion in their scrapbooks

 

UNIT 3: Learning, Playing and Working with Patterns

Learning Plan 3 of 5

Class: Infant 1

Theme: Learn, Play, Work         

Time Frame: 2 hours

Topic: E-Patterns

Context

It is common knowledge that we live in a world of rapidly advancing technology, a world our students are all too familiar with. So far, the activities developed for learning, playing and working with ‘patterns’ in this unit have moved pupils from physical (all hands-on) game situations to representing patterns at an iconic level on paper through print (mostly hands-on). This learning plan provides for an electronic exploration of patterns. Still at the iconic mode, pupils are now given the opportunity to explore and demonstrate their understandings through a digital medium thus providing yet another platform for differentiated learning. Learners who  prefer to use this medium thus also get their fair chance to explore the concept and application of ‘patterns’ while the rest of the class get the opportunity for enrichment or where needed, remediation.

 

Considerations

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

 

HFLE

 

 

ICT Skills

 

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

 

Assessment for Learning

 

 

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

  • Describe patterns, using examples.
  • Create and manipulate patterns in a digital environment.
  • Interact and collaborate with peers while using digital material
  • Review and evaluate what they and others have done

 

Activities

 

Review of patterns

  1. Students discuss what they remember about patterns.
  2. Students are divided into groups of four and given a bag or box of tiles or blocks in assorted sizes and colours. Students are asked to create a pattern that is ten tiles long.
  3. Participate in the ‘walk-around’ to carefully scrutinize each group’s work and suggest improvements as necessary. Have pupils point out repetitive units.
  4. Students are asked to make as many different patterns using the tiles given to you and share with groups around you.

 

E-Patterns

  1.  Students locate, an interactive site suitable for pattern making or

 use the on-screen tools to create different patterns.

  1. Students can also use Microsoft Word and insert shapes to form patterns.
  2. Print and display patterns formed on class ‘patterns’ wall, for your journal or for your scrapbook.

 

Note:

  • Groups can be rearranged with an appropriate spread of gifted/e-literate learners to produce more complicated patterns or to help facilitate more efficient process.
  • As far as possible, it is important for the teacher to facilitate at all groups and motivate and challenge pupils, create a ‘safe’ environment for sharing and carefully observe to assess and give feedback.
  • Acknowledge students’ efforts
  • Review with pupils, the schools’ rules (or policies) on use of the facilities.

 

Resources:

Gift paper and/or cloth with large enough simple repeat patterns and others printed but with patterns not easily recognizable, small (6-inch) printed plastic tiles, 15 cm by 15 cm cards.

Computers, internet facility, multimedia or digital projector, printer and paper, observation checklists, pupils’ beginners journals, scrap books, samples of completed and uncompleted work.

 

Assessment:

·         Teacher’s observation of tasks being performed by pupils (see attached)

·         Students’ responses in their beginner’s journals (instructed and assessed through rubric appended at end of Learning Plan 1)

·         Snapshots of differing stages for inclusion in their scrapbooks together with samples of pupils’ work

   

 

UNIT 3: Learning, Playing and Working with Patterns

Learning Plan 4 of 5

Class: Infant 1

Theme: Learn, Play, Work         

Time Frame: 3 hours

Topic:  Repetitions and Problem Solving

Context 

Problem solving is a skill that has to be trained continuously. Thus, in introducing young children to problem solving the focus skews in favour of logical multi-step approaches. An introduction to one such approach is demonstrated in the following activities. Its manifestation shows young children thinking about the problem (conceptualization), formulating a plan to solve the problem, collecting data/information to help solve the problem, grouping data collected, representing grouped data in a picture chart using symbols and repetitions of these, making sense of the represented data through studying the picture chart and drawing conclusions from what they found out about the repetitions on the chart with the problem in mind.

 

Considerations:

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

      HFLE

 

ICT Skills

 

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

 

 

Outcomes

At the end of this learning experience students will:

 

  • State precisely, the problem affecting the class for their class party
  • Develop strategies they could use to help solve the problem
  • Develop a  way to collect information/data easily
  • Collect and record data appropriately
  • Represent tabulated data in the form of a picture chart
  • Draw conclusions based on representations on picture chart
  • Review what they and others have done

Activities

 

  1. Discuss what types of snacks preferred for class party at the end of the term. Focus on more specific problem, and begin to suggest ways the problem can be solved: “What flavour ice cream should we buy for our class party at the end of the term?”
  2. In small groups discuss what can be done to solve the problem. Share ideas with rest of class. What kind of information should be collected to solve the problem? The problem, in one single, simple statement would be clearly written on board or on sentence strip.
  3. Based on the type of information that would be needed (number/or a count of how many people like which flavours), how can we find out that information? A table for doing so is presented. Counting and recording using stickers prepared by students are demonstrated using

another class or using some invited children to the class while pupils observe carefully. Rules for the success of the activity are explained (all pupils must be accounted for and can only give one answer to one of the flavours requested)

 

 

 

Flavour

 

 

Stickers: how many children like that flavour?

Strawberry

 

Chocolate

 

Coconut

 

Vanilla

 

Chocolate Ripple        etc.

 
  1. Similar, uncoloured stickers are given out to pupils to colour based on the flavour they like e.g. those preferring chocolate colour in brown, pink for strawberry and so on.
  2. Back in plenary mode, information is collected and represented in table based on pupils coming up to board and placing his/her in appropriate row.
  3. Brief presentation/discussion is done to provide pupils with appropriate content on how the information in the table can be represented in other ways such as picture charts. Reference must be made to use of the symbols to represent the different flavours and to be able to count ‘how many’ (prefer the different flavours). Pupils’ ideas within the demonstration should be explored and class invited to make comments if /when those occur.
  4. Blank picture/object chart is presented and stickers removed from table and placed on chart:

Ice cream flavours

Amount

 

 

 

  • To review how to fill in:

–          identify the lines that tell i) the flavours  ii) the amount of children

–          the symbol for each flavour and how many of those symbols

–          how to complete by sticking in a straight line upwards in the right place

–          an appropriate title for  the chart re:

 ‘A picture chart showing flavours of Ice cream wanted for class party’                                                   (to be placed above chart)

 

  • With reference to the completed picture chart, : 

 Are there repetitions of symbols on the chart?

-What repetitions can you see in the picture chart?

-How are these repetitions arranged?

-Which repetition is the longest?

 What does this tell us about that flavour of the ice-cream?

-Which repetition is the shortest?

                 – Does this picture chart help us solve the problem of which ice cream            

                   flavours should be bought for class party?

                   What other information did the chart help us with?

 

Resources :

Sentence strip of statement of problem and title of chart, observation checklists, pupils’ beginners journals, scrap books, prepared blank data collecting table and picture chart, cut-outs of ice-cream cone drawing (blank), crayons, masking tape.

 

Assessment :

Students’ responses in their beginner’s journals (instructed and assessed through rubric appended at end of Learning Plan 1)

Snapshots of differing stages for inclusion in their scrapbooks (see assessment at end of learning plan. 1 ( see attached)

 

   

UNIT 3: Learning, Playing and Working with Patterns

Learning Plan 5 of 5

Class: Infant 1

Theme: Learn, Play, Work      

Time Frame: 3 hours

Topic: A Problem with Trash- A Solution with Patterns

Context

Based on a real environmental issue affecting our society, evident even in the infant classrooms, the problem of proper waste disposal can be partly addressed even at the level of Infant One using the ideas explored in ‘Learning, Playing and Working with Patterns’ Students’ classroom waste (bottles, cans, candy wrappers, and other such ‘dried/inorganic’ materials) collected over a period of one week would be sorted for appropriate disposal for recycling, or for reuse. By constructing a picture chart and identifying patterns including the most popular type of waste, decisions about reducing that type of refuse can be made. Since this learning unit has been developed for its exploration in the third term, a wonderful opportunity exists for its link to “World Environmental Day” celebrated in early June. In addition to the conceptual knowledge and skills that will be further developed in this final Learning Plan, students will also develop important dispositions that are part and parcel of becoming responsible citizens.

 

 

 

Considerations:

 

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

 

      HFLE

 

 

ICT Skills

 

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

 

Assessment for Learning

 

 

Outcomes

At the end of this learning experience students will:

 

  • State precisely, the problem with litter disposal in their class
  • Suggest strategies they could use to help solve the problem
  • Sort accumulated waste appropriately
  • Collect and record data appropriately
  • Represent collected data on an appropriate picture chart
  • Draw conclusions and make decisions about waste reduction in class
  • Demonstrate responsibility for reducing the amount of waste produced
  • Review their own work and that of their peers

 

Activities:

 

  1. Share with rest of class the amount of litter that you think you would produce by the end of a day/a week in your classroom only. What about the amount that may be produced by the entire class for one week?

Using the students’ waste (‘dried’ litter) gathered over a week, display by empting on large mat/newsprint on classroom floor. Discussion is led to reasons why bins are always over-flowing and have to be emptied frequently. In small groups suggest how we can we appropriately ‘cut-down’ (reduce) the amount of waste we produce each week.

  1. After suggestions are shared (and possibly extended), students will group waste/litter according to:

1.    items that can be reused e.g. plastic water bottles, disposable foam cups for sowing seeds and 2. items that has to be disposed of. Record the amount of items that can be reused. Present table appropriately labelled for doing so.

 

 

 

 

 

Table showing types of class waste collected for one week.

 

Type of Waste

 

Symbols/pictures

 

How many?

 

Reusable

 

7

To throw away:

 

Glass

 

 

 

Plastic

 

 

 

Paper

 

 

 

Metal

 

 

 

 

  1. Using waste materials that cannot be safely reused, further group these based on what they are made from e.g. glass, metal (cans, aluminium foil), plastic, paper.

 

  1. Each group to create and cut out pictures to represent one type of waste material with amount for table and same amount for picture chart e.g.

one group do for reusable materials:             

 


                              X 14 (number told to pupils).

 

 

  1. Use symbols or pictures created to complete table. Review all data collected by ‘reading’ table.
  2. Review/elicit another way information in table can be presented.

 

  1. Represent data in table, using the other set of symbols created on blank picture chart e.g.

 

A picture chart showing the different types of waste from our class at the end of a week.

 

 

 

  • Carefully look at chart and look for repetitions.

– Which type of waste had the longest repetition?

-Which had the shortest repetition? (Thus which type of waste was least collected?).

  • Discussion is led into whether the answers to such questions (and of the like, depending on what the chart actually shows) are good or bad. The need for reducing litter in the class should be the basis of the discussion.
  • Suggested disposal of the different types of waste should then be discussed e.g. plastic and glass can be made into new things (recycling), vegetable and fruit peels can be put in a ‘compost’ heap and so on.

 

  • A class sanitation drive can then be put in place and possibly extended to the rest of the school. Can be done as class/school project.

Resources :

Sentence strip of statement of problem, pupils’ beginners’ journals, scrap books, prepared blank data collecting table, set of symbols or materials for making them, masking tape, sentence strip with title of chart written in, blank large picture chart, collected (dried) litter, disposable gloves and aprons, newsprint or large mat.

 

Assessment :

·         Students’ responses in their beginner’s journals (instructed and assessed through rubric appended at end of Learning Plan 1)

·         Snapshots of differing stages for inclusion in their scrapbooks

   

 

OBSERVATION CHECKLIST FOR ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING ACTIVITY 1

  • ‘FREEZE PATTERNS!’

CRITERIA

 

 

Name

 

 

Point out simple patterns in environment

 

 

Recognize ‘non-patterns’

 

 

Point out  simple patterns in class activities

 

 

Demonstrate simple patterns via body formations

 

 

Extend patterns in either direction

 

 

Follow instructions when participating in game of

 “Freeze Patterns”

         

 

 

Participate in activities which require careful observation of patterns and offer improvement suggestions

 

Group 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key for checklist  

√   – sub task done     X – sub task not done 

 Please Note:  This checklist can be adapted to include names of pupils once concept has been grasped. Because classrooms are so varied, the criteria can also be adapted to suit needs of individual classes, groups or individuals. Each criterion can also be further divided to include varying levels of achievement e.g. criterion clearly demonstrated, criterion sometimes demonstrated, criterion absent.

 

LEARNING UNIT SCRAPBOOK:

 

This resource piece is meant to function in the same way a developmental portfolio would minus the rigidity. However, as an assessment tool the teacher must play an active role in the development of each child’s scrapbook. If the journal is going to be specific to this unit then it can be included as part of the scrapbook. The key here is pupils’ gradual development of knowledge, skills and attitudes as the learning experience unfolds. It can therefore be used as a map for the child’s progress as well as to keep record of what is taking place in the classroom.

BEGINNER’S JOURNAL:

This can be a simple exercise book, notepad or something created in class using pieces of Bristol board or scrap-paper, decorated and student-personalized. All entries may not be written activities and can include drawings, stickers or pieces of work stuck in. It is important however, that pupils begin the reflective process and be encouraged to critically examine themselves and their work. Entries should also reflect feelings/dispositions of the child. Since use of this learning tool has such powerful potential for achieving curriculum goals, it is one that has to be well-planned pedagogically and introduced to beginners incrementally. Prompts are especially useful and can help with structure:

  • Date
  • A sentence (or 2 or 3 – again depending on student needs) about one thing they did/learnrd
  • Drawing (or piece of material/artifact stuck in) related to what they did on that day
  • How they felt about it or can use smiley faces such as    or
  • What they think could make their learning better (again, coded drawings or smileys can be used).

 

Although the use of allocated points or marks may not be as important within the formative assessment framework for this approach to curriculum, and particularly for this class level, it may still give a guide as to areas needed to be improved. As such, a simple rubric for assessing these journals and giving feedback can probably take the form of:

 

 

 

 

PUPIL’S NAME: __________________________                         DATE: _________________

 

 

LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE

 

CRITERIA

 

POOR (0)

 

AVERAGE (1)

 

GOOD (2)

 

MARKS

 

1. Full date of entry (day, date, month etc)

Did not state date in any way

Some parts of the date included

Full date clearly

outlined

/2

2. Description of new learning either through sentence or drawing

 

Did not mention new learning or any effect activity had on him/her.

New learning described in sentence or drawing indicates some aspect of new learning (allow pupil to orally explain if necessary)

New learning

described in more

than one sentences

or drawing somewhat

elaborate to illustrate

new learning.

/2

3. Description of how learning can be made better/more fun

No evidence/

expression of how learning can be made more fun

How learning can be improved in sentence or simple drawing (see above)

More than one sentence

describing how learning

can be made more fun

or, as above, fairly

descriptive drawing .

/2

TOTAL

 

 

 

 

/6

 

 

 

OBSERVATION CHECKLIST FOR ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING ACTIVITY 2

  • ‘PLANTS, PRINTS, PATTERNS!’
  • CRITERIA

 

 

Name

 

 

Point out simple patterns in environment and in resources displayed

 

 

Participation in group discussion on explanation of what a pattern is.

 

 

Identify repetitions in patterns 

 

 

Extend patterns in either direction

 

 

Follow instructions in creation of ‘hand-printed’ patterns

 

 

Follow instructions in creation of ‘motif-printed’ patterns

 

 

Participate in activities which require careful observation of patterns and offer improvement suggestions and compliments.

 

Group 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key for checklist  

√   – sub task done     X – sub task not done 

 Please Note:  This checklist can be adapted to include names of pupils once concept has been grasped. Because classrooms are so varied, the criteria can also be adapted to suit needs of individual classes, groups or individuals. Each criterion can also be further divided to include varying levels of achievement e.g. criterion clearly demonstrated, criterion sometimes demonstrated, criterion absent.

 

 

 

OBSERVATION CHECKLIST FOR ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING ACTIVITY 3

E – PATTERNS

  • CRITERIA

 

 

Name

 

 

Completion of statement on strip given

 

 

Creation of new repetitive unit of 3 tiles

 

 

Creation of at least one other repetitive unit 3 tiles long

 

 

Follow instructions in creation of

‘e- patterns’

 

 

Manipulation of on-screen tools appropriately:

1.       Drag and drop

 

 

Manipulation of on-screen tools appropriately:

2.       At least one twist made

                                                                                                                                         Drag and drop

 

 

Completion of activity- printed pieces

Group 1

 

1st word

2nd word

3rd word

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 2

 

1st word

2nd word

3rd word

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 3

 

1st word

2nd word

3rd word

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 4

 

1st word

2nd word

3rd word

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group 5

 

1st word

2nd word

3rd word

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key for checklist  

√   – sub task done     X – sub task not done 

 Please Note:  This checklist can be adapted to include names of pupils once concept has been grasped. Because classrooms are so varied, the criteria can also be adapted to suit needs of individual classes, groups or individuals. Each criterion can also be further divided to include varying levels of achievement e.g. criterion clearly demonstrated, criterion sometimes demonstrated (you can determine all the levels you want), criterion absent.