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Unit 1 Exploring My world 

Learning Plans:-

  UNIT ONE:   EXPLORING MY WORLD                                                                                      

Learning Plan: 1  of  6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:    ME AND MY WORLD

Duration:  ½ day    

Topic: My Home and Community

Context: Students are familiar with their homes and their immediate environment and they can identify a particular location as their home. Homes form part of the community.

CONSIDERATIONS:

HFLE

Literacy

☒Reading

☐Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

Numeracy

 

 

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         Explain the importance of a home.

·         Develop an appreciation for their homes.

·         Create  pictures of their homes using plane shapes

·         Evaluate the importance of knowing one’s address and directions to one’s home.

·         State their addresses.

·         Locate their communities on a map. 

·         Predict an outcome to the story “Home Sweet Home

Activities:

           Story

1.    Students listen to the story (storyline attached) “Home Sweet Home”.  Students predict possible outcomes for the story by recalling prior events in the text and through guided questioning by the teacher. They dramatize the story and then explain why home is important. In small groups, use their bodies to form a ‘home’ for the characters in the story.

 

Making homes

2.    Students would use the resources provided to create a picture/model of their own home or a home they would like to have OR create a virtual home using ITC resources e.g. “smartboard” for the boys in the story.

 

My Address

3.    Students listen to a story about children going to a party but getting lost and arriving too late because they did not know the address. They discuss how the children felt when they missed the party and recommend how such a situation could have been avoided.

4.    Students describe and display the pictures/models they had created and state their own addresses using the words “I live at ……” As a follow up activity, the students would be required to bring/create a picture of a landmark from their community.

5.    Students examine the location of their home community through the use of a software program (Interactive maps.) Large maps may also be used to enable children to identify the location of their homes/communities.

6.    Display

Pictures of homes and their respective landmarks would be displayed on newsprint around the classroom.   

Resources:

site: http://maps.google.com/maps, map of Trinidad/Tobago,   computer with internet access,  multimedia projector, CD with slide show, stationery for writing/drawing, story, play dough, news print, kits each containing: (i) plastic, foil, fabric and paper of varying shapes, sizes, textures and colours, (ii) glue

Assessment:

·         Observation

·         Conversations

·         Drama

·         Artwork

   

#1

 Story line:

Home Sweet Home

Children (give them names) did not want to help with chores at home so they decided to run away from home.

They spent all day playing with the animals at the park.

They have a lot of fun.

A big dog scared a squirrel who ran to his home high up in a tree.

Darkness fell.

The birds said goodbye to the children and flew away to the nest which was their home.

The frogs also said goodbye and hopped off to their home in the pond.

The rabbits ran to their home which was a hole in ground.

Children began to feel tired and hungry but there was nowhere for them to go to have a meal and get some rest.

They could not sleep in the birds’ nest or in the frogs’ pond or in the rabbit’s hole in the ground.

They began to cry. Louder and louder! “We want to go home. Somebody, please take us home.”

“When we go home, we will get a meal and a nice warm bed to sleep.”

Soon they saw a light shining at them.

(Students are allowed to predict outcomes for the story.)

It was their parents (or the police) who had come to look for them.

The children were delighted to see (their parents).

They were so happy to see . . . that they … (hugged their parents and apologised for not wanting to do their chores and running away from home.)

 (Their parents) took them home where they were given their dinner and put to sleep in their warm beds.

#2

Storyline

Shelly and Kenrick were very excited because they were invited to the birthday party their friend Robert. Their mother wrapped the present they had bought and they set off in the car, on their way to their friend’s home. As they were driving along the street, their father asked, “Where does your friend live?”

“I don’t know,” said Shelly.

“I know!” Kenrick said excitedly. “Robert lives in … (teacher can choose any location).

Their father drove to (San Fernando). Shelly and Kenrick were happy until their father asked them the name of the street where their friend lived. They did not know their friend’s address. They did not know the name of the street or the number of the house. They kept driving around but could not find the party ay Robert’s house. Father did not have his phone with him so they had to go back home to call Robert for his address. By this time it was too late to go to the party.  

UNIT 1:   Exploring My World

Learning Plan: 2 of 6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Places: Home, School, Community

Duration: ½ day

Topic:  My School      

Context:

School is one of the most important experiences in the lives of our children. It is here that they acquire most of their skills both academic and social.

CONSIDERATIONS:

HFLE

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☐Media & Information Literacy

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

  • state the name and address of their school
  • locate their school on a map
  • evaluate the importance of knowing the name and address of one’s school
  • create an image of their school and label it
  • demonstrate their knowledge of the use capital letters by labelling the image of their school
  • identify their school in Spanish

Activities:

Identifying their school

  1. Students walk around the school compound or in the hall pretending to be in search of their own school. They view several pictures of schools which have been placed around the compound. There would be similar pictures of schools but with different concealed names tags and addresses. Students select the pictures which they think represent their school, and give reasons for their choice.

Students reveal the tags and using previously learnt reading skills, they would select the name tag and picture which represents their school. They read the name and address (general location) of their school.

Role play

  1. Students play the role of a child being taken to school by a relative who does not know the name/address of the school. They provide the necessary information so they can be taken to the correct school

Representing the school

  1. Students use the resources provided to create an image of their school.
  2. Students create a label for their image. They suggest with reasons, which case (upper or lower) letters should be used to write the name of the school. Students complete the worksheet by writing the name and location of their school.

Mi escuela

  1. Students view a slide show with several pictures of buildings (see “Exploring My World Resources” on CD). Each time a school is shown they hear the word ‘escuela’. The students are asked to suggest what the word “escuela” means. Pupils are then shown a picture of their own school and the teacher says the words “Mi escuela”. The students are asked to suggest the meaning of the words “Es mi escuela”.
  2. Students listen carefully as the words “Es mi escuela.” are pronounced slowly by the teacher. They then repeat with accurate pronunciation and intonation.  The teacher listens carefully to ensure that the students pronounce the words properly. They repeat the words “Es mi escuela.” then say in English, “It is my school.”

 Finding my school

  1. In groups of four or five, students again walk around the school compound/hall, in search of pictures of their own school. Once more they observe the pictures of schools which have been placed around the compound/hall. This time in they would move to a picture which represents their own school, and say the words “Es mi escuela. This is my school.” As the teacher shouts the word “escuela”, the groups would move to identify another picture of their school with the words “Es mi escuela. This is my school.

Resources:

Computer, projector, pictures of schools, labels with schools’ names and addresses (e.g. John Hall Memorial School, Bloody Bay), stationery for writing/drawing, modelling clay, Lego blocks, craft sticks, glue,  bristol board strips of different colours, worksheet

Assessment:

  • Students complete a worksheet (see attached)
  • Class activity: Students are shown pictures of different schools (samples attached). Each time they are shown a picture of their own school, they would stand and say “Es mi escuela.”
   

 

 

 

WORK SHEET

My name is _____________________________________

The name of my school is ___________________________

________________________________________________

My school is in _____________________________________

Draw a picture of your school

 

 

  UNIT 1:  Exploring My World                                                                                     

Learning Plan: 3  of 6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:    Places: Home, School, Community

Duration:  1/2 day

Topic: Rules in the Home, School and Community

Context:   

School is a safe and happy place where children should be free to express themselves, learn on their own and in collaboration with others.  Children need to understand that rules are important feel safe, be happy and learn effectively.

CONSIDERATIONS:

HFLE

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

  • explain the importance of rules
  • formulate rules for their class
  • read list of rules
  • create a poster of a rule
  • use body movements to read out rules

Activities:

 

Making rules

  1. Students listen to a story entitled “A Town Without Rules” (See attached). Students discuss the outcomes of the story through guided questioning.
  1. Students formulate rules which they think could improve the outcomes of the situations which occurred in the video. The rules would be written on the board.

Rules Song

  1. Students listen to the song (lyrics in attached). They sing along as the song is repeated. At the end of each stanza, they identify the words which tell how they should ‘be’. Individual pupils would select an appropriate picture and display it for all to see. The class would then say the rule which applies to that picture.

Reading  and enacting the rules

  1. Students read the rules and spell and pronounce words selected by the teacher.
  1. Students are arranged in small groups. Each group would choose a flash card, identify the word “kind/safe/tidy/polite” then demonstrate through role play, how they would follow that rule at home, at school or in the community.

Making Posters

  1. Students, individually, select a flashcard with one of the words and then select the corresponding picture. They create a poster by sticking the picture and writing the rule “I must be …” Posters will be displayed around the school.

Physical Rules

  1. Students would be shown how to perform a simple forward jump by bending the knees slightly, swinging the arms backward and landing on the balls of their feet.  Flash cards with the words “kind, polite, safe, I, be, tidy, must,” are placed on the floor. (There should be many more cards than students.) At the sound of the teacher’s whistle, selected students would jump to words and read the rule as they jump.

Resources:

Song, “I must be kind”, pictures depicting persons being  kind, polite, safe, and tidy, flashcards, stationery for drawing/colouring/ writing, letter size card paper/Bristol board, whistle

 

Assessment:

  • Checklist
  • Observation
   

A Town without Rules

Why do we have rules?

Do you like to obey rules?

What would it be like if there were no rules at all?

Let’s listen to a story about a place where there were no rules.

There was once a place which was called “The Town Without Rules.”  At first, everyone who lived in that town was very happy because they could do whatever they wanted. The children did not wear their correct uniforms to school and they hardly did the work their teachers gave them to do. Some of them went to school late every day. They played in the classrooms at lunchtime, running and jumping on the tables and chairs. Very often they fell and hurt themselves.

At home, no one made up their beds or kept their rooms tidy. The children played football and cricket and in the living room and rode their bicycles all through the house. This destroyed many things in the house.

The people who lived in that town, drove their vehicles very fast along the streets. No one cared about the traffic signs or about the other people on the streets. They went into their neighbours’ yards and picked fruits from the trees without asking permission.  Nobody wanted to go to the parks and beaches because they were so untidy. The people threw garbage everywhere and played music so loudly that everyone who was nearby, got a terrible headache.

Would you like to live in this town?

Why or Why not?

SONG FOR TEACHING ‘RULES

Tune: The Farmer in the Dell

I MUST BE…

 

I must be kind (2 times)

               or safe/tidy/polite

Every day, in every way,

I must be kind/safe/tidy/polite

I must do my best (2 times)

Every day, in every way,

I must do my best.

 

  UNIT 1: Exploring My World

Learning Plan: 4 of 6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:   Places: Home, School, Community

Duration: 1 day

Topic:  Responsibilities in the Home, School & Community

Context: The home, school and community are places where children learn as they work and play. Understanding and accepting responsibilities promote safety and harmony in our homes, schools and communities.

CONSIDERATIONS:

HFLE

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☐Media & Information Literacy

Numeracy

 

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         state some responsibilities of persons in the home, school and community

·         determine and accept their responsibilities at school

·         use a second language to identify objects for which they are responsible at school

·         use grammatical patterns taught to compose simple sentences about their responsibilities

Activities:

Story

1.    Students listen to the story entitled ‘Nobody is Working Today’. They identify the inconveniences which are caused when we shirk our responsibilities. Brief review of the responsibilities of people in the community as were discussed in a previous lesson.

 

Responsibilities at Home

2.     Students are arranged in a circle and each child is given the opportunity to step forward and perform actions to indicate the responsibilities of the people in his/her home. The rest of the class will guess the action and suggest which member of the family might be responsible for it.

3.    Students state their own responsibilities and give a demonstration on how they perform it. The other students who have similar responsibilities at home join in the demonstration.

4.    Students are encouraged to identify the responsibilities they enjoy and those they don’t giving reasons for their decisions. Students will be given the opportunity to justify whether or not unpleasant chores should still be done. (What happens if certain chores not done because we don’t like doing them?)

Responsibilities at School

5.    Students walk around the school and ascertain the responsibilities of the people on the compound, taking photographs and conducting on the spot interviews if necessary. They also take photographs of classrooms.

6.    Students will, on return to their own classroom, review the pictures paying attention to the cleanliness and order of the classrooms visited.

7.    Students would decide how they would like their class to be. They propose ways of keeping their own classroom in order; identify the objects and activities in their classroom for which they are responsible. They arrange books, furniture, book bags etc. to set the class in order.

Spanish

8.    Students observe a slide show “Things in My Classroom” (see Exploring My World Resources) to acquire the Spanish words for book, chair, table, pencil and bag. They listen then repeat as each of the words libro, silla, mesa, lapiz and bolso is called by their friends (Amigo and Amiga). The teacher listens for accurate pronunciation.  Pupils move around the classroom touching and naming the objects libro, silla, mesa, lapiz and bolso as they are called by the teacher.

Bingo

9.    Students use ‘bingo cards’ with pictures of libro, silla, mesa, lapiz and bolso. They will repeat the words called by the teacher then cover the appropriate pictures with the buttons.

Resources:

Bingo cards (see CD for sample), buttons, multimedia projector computer, Power Point presentation with pictures of book, chair, table, pencil and bag. digital camera

 

Assessment:

·         Bingo Game, counters

   

BINGO CARDS

OBJECTS IN THE CLASSROOM

  UNIT ONE:    EXPLORING MY WORLD                                                                                      

Learning Plan: 5 of 6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:    ME AND MY WORLD

Duration:  ½ day

Topic:   Greeting Others in the Home, School & Community

Context:  Students need to understand that each person is a part of a home, school and community. As members of a multi ethnic society, students should be aware of and appreciate different ways of greeting others.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

 

HFLE

 

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☐Writing

☒Oral Communication

☐Media & Information Literacy

Numeracy

 

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         Identify ways of greeting others.

·         Appreciate ways of greeting in other cultures.

·         Demonstrate knowledge of the words “morning, good, afternoon”

·         Recognize the words for “Good Morning” and “Good Afternoon” in Spanish.

·         Say the Spanish words “Buenos dias” and “Buenas tardes”  

·         Sing a greeting song in English and Spanish.

Activities:

                Singing

1.    Students form an inner and outer circle facing each other. They sing the greeting song “Good Morning, Good Morning” (lyrics attached) while moving around clockwise and greeting each other.  When they get back to their original partner, they are asked to sing again, moving in the opposite direction this time, singing “Good Afternoon.”

 

Greeting Others

2.    Students walk around the school pretending they are walking through the community. They demonstrate other ways of greeting with which they may be familiar.

3.    Students will view a slide show of people greeting each other, model the greetings and chat about the similarities/differences observed, noting the different body parts which were used.

4.    Students role play how they greet someone on entering a public place e.g. an office, a store. The words “morning, afternoon and good” would be written on the board.

Identifying Words

5.    Students would repeat after each word on the board is called by the teacher, and then select the corresponding flash card, from among the set that has been distributed to them. They would touch and repeat the words on the cards several times. Students would be given an opportunity to match a flashcard of their choice with a word on the board. In pairs, they would display flash cards to form greetings “Good morning” or “Good afternoon”. Students may need to exchange cards to form the greetings if necessary.

                Greeting in Spanish

6.    Students will be shown pictures of people greeting each other. Students suggest what the greeting might be if the time of day is morning or afternoon. As the students say the greeting in English, the teacher introduces them to the Spanish. The teacher would slowly say the greetings “buenos dias, buenas tardes”.

7.    Students listen while the words are spoken by the teacher, then repeat with accurate pronunciation and intonation.  The teacher listens carefully to ensure that the students pronounce the words properly. Students listen carefully as the teacher calls the greetings in Spanish. They repeat the greeting then say it in English.

Role Play

8.    Students role play greeting parents, teachers and friends using the words “Buenos dias …..” and “Buenas tardes ……” according to scenarios given by the teacher.

Musical Cards

9.    Students stand in a circle. Pictures are circulated as the greeting song is played. When the music stops the students with the cards in hand will display their pictures and say the greetings (in English and Spanish) which could be used in the scenario depicted by the picture. e.g. greeting a parent at the end of the school day.

Responsive Singing

10. Students listen to another greeting song (lyrics attached) twice then sing along as it is played several times. They participate in responsive singing of the song as the class is divided into two groups. The first group sings one line of the song and the other group responds until the song is complete.

Students stand and point to the other group when it’s their turn to sing.

               The groups are rotated so that all students get the opportunity   

                to sing the entire song.

Resources:  Cd player, CD,  pictures,

Assessment:

·         Observation/Checklist

·         Game – Musical cards

   

 

 

GREETING SONG

 

Good morning/afternoon, good morning/afternoon and how do you do

Good morning/afternoon, good morning/afternoon, I’m fine. How are you?

 

 

SONG FOR TEACHING “Good Morning/Afternoon” in Spanish

 

Tune: Happy Birthday to You

              

Lyrics

Group 1: Good morning to you

Group 2: Buenos dias to you.

Group 1: Good morning,

Group 2: Buenos dias.

All: Buenos dias to you.

Group 1: Good afternoon to you,

Group 2: Buenas tardes to you.

Group 1: Good afternoon,

Group 2: Buenas tardes.

All: Buenas tardes to you.

  UNIT ONE:   EXPLORING MY WORLD

Learning Plan: 6 of 6

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:   ME AND MY WORLD

Duration:   1 ½ days

Topic: Structure and Function in Home, School and Community

Context:

Through critical thinking and reasoning students would realise that the design of structures found in the home, school and in the community is specific to their intended use.

HFLE

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☐Media & Information Literacy

Numeracy

 

 

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         Understand the relation between structure and function of objects found in the home, school and community.

·         Collaborate to name and classify objects (solids) based on their functions.

·         Describe objects (solids) found in their surroundings

·         Design a structure to help solve a problem

·         Build models of structures.

·         Justify the design of models.

·         Write a simple sentence about the structure and function of an object in the home.

Activities:

           Field Trip

1.    Students are taken on a field trip through the community. They observe and identify the structures around them. Through guided questioning, students offer suggestions about why the structures were built or fashioned in that particular manner.

2.    Students compare pictures of structures taken on the field trip. They note the differences and similarities and offer reasons e.g. they compare differences in design of a house/mall, chairs in the home/benches in the park.

3.    Students are taken on a walk around the school to observe structures in the environment. E.g. tank stand, guard booth, cupboards, shelves, staircase/ramp, tables, water trough, blocks, cans, bins etc. and identify their functions. They describe the structures (or solids) eg the water tank looks like a big can and it is tall, the guard booth looks like a big box. They suggest other structures which might be able to perform the same function and select which might be the most suitable choice.

Classifying according to function

4.    Students are placed in groups, each of which owns a ‘store/shop’ with replicas of items found at home such as stools, ladders, beds, bowls, colanders, stoves, microwave oven, balls, cans, boxes, blocks.  Students go ‘shopping’ for items suited to a function described by the teacher. Each group is asked to buy one item suitable to the function described by the teacher.  The purchased items are grouped together and the class judges whether they were suitable.

5.    Students choose an item from the ‘shop/store and describe it’ eg a ball is round. They write a sentence about the function of a selected item. E.g. This is a …… We can use it to ….. ..

Creating Structures

6.    Students work in groups using building blocks, an assortment of solids, play dough, craft sticks etc. to create a structure for a function (real or fictional) which will be specified by the teacher. The groups would then display and explain their structure.

 

           Worksheet

7.    Students would be given a worksheet with images of objects in the home, school and community. They justify their choice for the function specified by the teacher then colour it.(sample attached)

 

 

 

 

Resources:

Play dough, digital camera, computer, multimedia projector, stationery supplies, building blocks, an assortment of solids, craft materials, pictures and samples of objects found in the home e.g. pot spoon, tablespoon, bench, ladder,  paint brushes for art and house painting,   worksheet

Assessment:

·         Observation.  

·         Oral presentation of models.

   

State with reasons, which one of the items in each box you would use to do the jobs stated below.

 Box 1. To put a plant in our classroom.

      Box 2. To eat noodles.

 Box 3. To keep your pet fish.

      Box 4. To go on a field trip around our community.

      Box 5. To teach your little brother/sister to ride.

      Box 6. To take soup out of the pot.

CHECKLIST FOR ASSESSING ARTWORK/PROJECTS

Class: 1st Year Infants                    Theme: ME AND MY WORLD

 

Topic: …………………………………………………………………… Learning Plan: ……. of …….

 

STUDENT

Project done according to instructions.

Student/s able to explain the project.

Colours, shapes etc. were used appropriately.

Cooperation was evident during the course of the project.

Neatness

COMMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GENERAL CHECKLIST FOR LEARNING PLANS

 

Class: 1st Year Infants                    Theme: ME AND MY WORLD

 

Topic: ………………………………………………………………………….       Learning Plan: ……. of …….

 

 

Place a check mark under the number to indicate whether that outcome was achieved by the student.

 

 

 

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Good Morning/Afternoon

Tune: Happy Birthday To You

               Lyrics

 

Group 1: Good morning to you

Group 2: Buenos dias to you.

Group 1: Good morning,

Group 2: Buenos dias.

All: Buenos dias to you.

 

Group 1: Good afternoon to you,

Group 2: Buenas tardes to you.

Group 1: Good afternoon,

Group 2: Buenas tardes.

All: Buenas tardes to you.

 

Unit 2 Exploring Solids (3D Shapes

Learning Plans:-

Learning Unit 2: Exploring Solids (3D Shapes)

Class:           Infant Year 1                                                              Theme: Places: Home, School, Community     

Unit Topic:  Exploring Solids (3D Shapes)                                    Estimated Frame:  1 Week

Context:

3D Shapes or solids are everywhere. These solids can be found in the home, the school or in the community.  Solids have a variety of features that can be easily identified.  Solids (3D Shapes) can be used for making buildings and other forms of structures.  The manipulation of solids allows students the opportunity to develop their mathematical conceptual understanding as well as learn a new vocabulary. Additionally, students get the opportunity to explore their creative skills as they participate in fun, active learning experiences.

Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:

 

1.    Distinguish between solids (3D shapes) based on their features

2.    Display curiosity in the exploration of  solids (3D shapes)

3.    Collaborate with peers to represent solids (3D shapes) through the isolation /manipulation  of body parts

4.    Recognize the importance of pitch accuracy in singing as they sing about places in their neighbourhood

5.    Recite poem based on the world in which they live

6.    Collaborate with peers to design layout of buildings in their community

7.    Make basic structures / models of familiar buildings with play dough and solids (3D shapes)

8.    Label the buildings using upper case letters and neat handwriting

9.    Display a sense of enjoyment through participating in activities

10.  Describe solids (3D shapes) using appropriate vocabulary

11.  Identify words used to describe solids (3D shapes )(on flashcards) to create a word bank

12.  Recognize letters of words in their initial, medial and final position

13.  Compose sentences orally and in written format

14.  Identify initial letters and sounds in given words based on solids (3D shapes)

15.  Distinguish solids (3D shapes) in their home, school and community

16.  Build a 3D museum using real 3D objects collected

17.  Develop an appreciation for the classroom community and the works of their peers

18.  Recognize words of objects in the 3D museum

19.  Count the number of objects in each section of the museum

20.  Illustrate in their journals, what they liked about the 3D museum experience

 

 

Learning Plans:

 

1.    Features of solids (3D Shapes)

2.    3D Community

3.    3D Language

4.    3D Museum

Resources:

3D objects- varying sizes of boxes, paper rolls, ice cream cones, balls, dice

Art and craft materials, play dough, stationery supplies, bins or baskets for a game

Use search words for links to relevant songs and poem:

Lyrics and tune. Search any song which deals with for song available

 

Assessments:

 

·         Teacher observation

·         Discussion

·         Matching activities

·         Guided Oral Questioning

·         Journals

·         Artworks

·         Project presentation

·         Performance based assessment

 

 

  UNIT 2: EXPLORING SOLIDS (3D SHAPES)

Learning Plan: 1 of 4 in total

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Places, Home, School, Community

Duration:        1 day

Topic:  Features of Solids (3D Shapes)        

Context:

Solids (3D shapes) are easy to identify in places in the community.  In this first Learning Plan, students begin to understand the mathematical concept of solids (3D shapes). These shapes can be found in many of the daily things that children use at home or school, or see in their community.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☐Reading

☐Writing

☒Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☐Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

 

 

 

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         Distinguish between solids (3D shapes) based on their features

·         Display curiosity in the exploration of  solids (3D shapes)

·         Compare the location of objects using terms related to the concept of length (far/near from school)

  • Collaborate with peers to represent solids (3D shapes) using their bodies

 

Pre-lesson activity –

Field Trip activity

1.    (preparation for a field trip to view buildings and objects in the community.) Teacher and students participate in a walkabout or fieldtrip activity in the community. 

OR

 

Photo Journal/ PowerPoint presentation

1.    Teacher takes photos of various buildings and structures in the vicinity of the school and presents them in class to elicit a discussion (sample attached)

 

2.    Teacher uses guided questioning to help students to focus on the shapes of structures such as buildings or objects seen within the school community. Students are asked to think of:

a) what do the objects or buildings look like (eg. a water tank looks like a big can;   an electricity pole looks like a tall straw or pipe; a building looks like a big box). 

b) reasons why the structures were built with such shapes in mind.

c) which object or structure is near to the school or far from school.

 

         After discussion, students prepare for the following tasks:

 

Sorting 3D Shapes

3.    Students collect assorted 3D shapes from the teacher. They manipulate 3D shapes (assorted boxes, tubes, cones, balls) through building, stacking and/or rolling solids in play activity. They explore the given solids by describing, for example, their colour, size, shape, function and by naming them.

 

4.    Students collect kits from the teacher, to sort their solids, for example: those that have the same colour; those that are pointed; those that are boxes, those that can roll and those that look like poles. Students are allowed to come up with their own categories.

 

Describing solids (3D Shapes)

5.    Each group of students is questioned by the teacher, who asks them about their categories for sorting the solids. Students select any 3D shape and describe what they noticed about the shape. They describe or name objects in their home, school or communities that look like the given shape. They are encouraged to state the function of the object which they described.

 

Describing the location of solids (3D Shapes)

6.    Solids are arranged as a display on the teacher’s table. Students listen to the teacher as he/she models concepts of distance (near/far) and position (in front of; behind, etc.) using the solids. Students volunteer to pinpoint the solid that is close to another; far away from another. Students work in groups, using their solids (3D shapes) to practise concepts of location/position of solids in relation to each other.

 

Game Activities

7.    A game of ‘Clue’ is played with the students, with the teacher giving the hints:

“My shape has only one point”: Students hold the cone.

“I stand up straight like a tall building”: Students hold up a box or can

“I am round”: Students hold up a ball.

Students are allowed to play the guessing game with their friends in groups.

 

8.    Students are grouped to play a game where they use their bodies to make a shape with at least one main identifying marker. For example: When asked, ‘Can you make a shape with one point?’ Students stand in a circle and join hands upwards to make a point. They must communicate with each other to demonstrate cooperation in order to execute the task properly.

 

Resources:

 kits, collection of boxes, rolls, cones, blocks, party hats, paper cups, cans, balls; stationery material, art material, 3D shapes

 

Assessment:

1.    Game activity to find 3D Shapes :

Students and teacher participate in a “Simon Says game” in which the teacher says:

‘Simon says to find an object that has a point/is round/looks like a pole/is like a box/is big/is small.’

 

2.     Teacher observation of students as they interact in groups and in game activities

   

 

 

  UNIT 2:  Exploring Solids (3D Shapes)

Learning Plan: 2 of 4 in total

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:   Places, Home, School, Community

Duration:        2 days

Topic:             3D Community        

Context:

Solids (3D shapes) can be seen in buildings that are found in the community. Students can connect with their community through the use of solids (3D shapes) to make models of their community.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

 

·         Recognize the importance of pitch and accuracy in singing as they sing about places in their neighbourhood

·         Collaborate with peers to design the layout of buildings in their community

·         Make basic structures/ models of familiar buildings with play dough and solids (3D shapes)

·         Describe their models using language associated with geometry and location (near/far)

·         Label the buildings using upper case letters and neat handwriting

·         Display a sense of camaraderie through participating in activities

Activities

 

 Design And Construction Of Community

1.    Students are told that they are designers of their own community. They are put into teams to think about the layout and design of their ideal community. They listen to each other’s opinion based on what each student would like to have in the community.

2.    They use art materials to work together to draw what they would like to have in their community.

3.    Students are reminded about the solids that they can use as part of their designs. They are given solids (3D shapes) and art /craft materials to construct and decorate their community.  Students present their models to the class. They describe their models indicating solids used, position of solids and rationalize choice of solids for different aspects in the community. Teacher would question accordingly to encourage use of geometric language.

 

 Labelling Of Buildings In Community

4.    Students use small cards to label their buildings. They are reminded to use upper case letters to begin the name of each place. They use neat handwriting to ensure that the names could be read easily.

 

 Peer Interviews

5.    On completion of activity, students participate in a Walk Around to see each team’s community. They look at the buildings that were put in each community and ask questions or respond to any questions that their peers may have. Students are encouraged to ask questions related to the position of buildings in each community.

Resources

3D shapes (solids), kits, art/craft materials, stationery materials, PowerPoint on 3D buildings (see CD), play dough, paper, multimedia, projector and speakers for song.

 

Assessment:

·      Teacher Checklist for observation of students’ interaction  throughout all activities

·      Oral guided questioning

·      Presentation of models

·      Interviews with students to ask them about their feelings of participating in singing activity

·      Allowance for students to showcase their ability to sing the song or recite the poem given in the activities

 

SAMPLE TEACHER CHECKLIST

NAME OF STUDENT

ORAL COMMUNICATION

3D COMMUNITY

MODEL

PARTICIPATION IN GROUP ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

UNIT 2:  Exploring Solids (3d Shapes)

Learning Plan: 3 of 4

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Places: Home, School, Community

Duration:        2 ½ hours

Topic:              3D Language

Context:

A new vocabulary emerges when students examine shapes more closely. It is important to develop this knowledge, both orally and in writing, and have students practise using these terms to help with their understanding, memory and recall of solids (3D shapes) as well as the language of position and size regarding solids.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

1.    describe solids (3d shapes) using appropriate vocabulary

2.    identify words associated with the features/characteristics of solids (3d shapes) as well as their position

3.    create a word bank of 3d associated words

4.    recognize letters of words in their initial, medial and final position

5.    compose sentences  orally and in written format

6.    explore shapes through isolation of body parts

7.    collaborate with peers in a positive manner during all activities.

 

Activities

 Review  solids (3D shapes) and Vocabulary terms

1.    Students collect kits with an assortment of solids (3D shapes) used in previous lesson. Students are allowed to manipulate the solids to review their features. Students are asked by the teacher to show the solid that is big; small; round; pointed, etc.

 

2.    Teacher shows flashcards  to students, with the phrases related to positions such as: ‘in front of’; ‘next to’; ‘behind’ and ‘on top of’. Teacher and students read the words and review what each phrase means.  Students collect flashcards with the phrases and are instructed to use their solids to demonstrate the meaning of each phrase on the given flashcard.

 

 Spelling activity

3.    In pairs, students select a solid (3D shape). Students describe what they notice about the solid (3D shape). They are asked to help the teacher spell the describing words correctly. They sound the initial letter of each descriptor and take turns to race to the board to find the letters to spell the word. (The letters or words are displayed on the table by the teacher).The letters are stuck next to the solid. The exercise is repeated by the teacher, who asks the students to select the words that describe the solids (3D shapes).

 

  1. Kits with shapes are stored away by the teacher.  Students and teacher review all words as the teacher draws attention to the letters that make up the words (words may include: point, round, ball, box, big, small). Students name the letters, sound the initial letters, blends or digraphs within words, repeating the sounds that the teacher says. The whole word is pronounced for the students to listen to and say. This exercise is repeated for each word.

 

Making sentences

  1. In groups, students collect solids and a selection of words from the word bank.  Students work together to choose selected words that match the given solid, as well as other words from the word bank that they would need to create their sentences.  Members of each group present and read their sentences to the class. Students stick each sentence on the word wall chart to form part of their daily reading material.

 

 Game activity 

  1. Students participate in a game where they have to perform an action when a certain word with the initial sound is heard.

 For example:

‘roll’ – they roll their arms to make a rolling motion (why was this taken out?)

‘point’ – they use their arms and fingers to point to each  other or stretch their arms and bodies up to the ceiling

 

Resources:

flashcards, markers, kits, 3D shapes, cut outs of letters and words, balls, bean bags, container bins

 

Assessment:

3D throwing activity:

Containers with labels describing 3D shapes are placed in a spot in the classroom.  Students are given balls or bean bags to throw to a container. They are given points for throwing the bean bag into the container. They also have to pronounce the word that they ‘caught’. Points (out of 10 in total), will be given to the student for the correct pronunciation.

 

 

   

 

 

  UNIT 2:  Exploring Solids (3D Shapes)

Learning Plan: 4 of 4

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:   Places, Home, School, Community

Duration:        1 day

Topic: 3D Museum

Context:

 In their exploration of solids (3D shapes), students begin to develop research skills as they make connections with the concepts that they are learning in school to the real world. This Learning Plan provides a healthy transfer of learning.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         Build a 3D museum using real objects that have features of solids (3D shapes)

·         Recognize word names of objects in their 3D museum

·         Count the number of objects in each section of the museum

  • Illustrate in their journals, what they liked about the 3D museum experience

Activities:

(Pre lesson activity:  Parental guidance necessary since students are required to explore their community to find solids (3D shapes) and use digital cameras to take snapshots of places in their neighbourhood that relates to solids (3D shapes). Students collect real examples of solids (3D shapes) from their homes.) Students are informed that they will have a special place in the class for a Museum. In the museum, they will be showing off their 3D objects collection. 

 

Exploring word wall

1.    Word cards are presented to the students from the previous lesson (words such as: round, small, big, pointed). Students are asked to sound the words, focusing on the initial, medial and final sounds.

 

Show and Tell activity

2.    Students participate in a ‘Show and Tell’, where they display and talk about what they brought for the museum. Students respond to questions based on what they brought, and their reasons for bringing in the objects.

Building the 3D museum

3.    Students pool all of their objects on a large table. They collaborate on how to begin building the museum collection. They decide on the categories to use based on the features of the shapes. They select labels for the shelves and take turns to place their objects in each category.

Counting activity

4.    Students count the number of items in each category. They use the numbers that represent the amount and stick them by each category. (These numbers will change as students bring in more objects on a daily/weekly basis, in their excitement to build the museum)

 

Resources:

Collection of solids (3D shapes) and objects, pictures of places in the community, class shelves, tape, glue, labels, stationery materials, art/craft materials

Search words in any online search engine:How to make a mini book

Assessment:

1.    Teacher observation of students throughout activities

2.    Journal / Mini book – students create a journal or mini book of their museum: Students are given stationery material to write and draw what they liked about the museum, or represent their ideas about a 3D museum in a mini book.

3.    Matching activity- students match word cards to objects in the museum (word cards will remain on wall for students to see, read and write).

 

   

 

 

 

Unit 3 Places in the Community
Learning Plans:-

LEARNING UNIT 3

 

Class: Infant Year 1                                                                           Theme: Places: Home, School, Community

Unit Topic: Places In The Community                                                                            Estimated frame:  1week

Context: 

 

This unit Places in the Community focuses on landmarks; safe places at school and in the community, which children can access for playing; a virtual field trip, which infuses ICT to allow all students to share the same field trip experience and an exploration of the community of plants and animals (habitats).

 

It is important for students to know the types of homes and components of habitats that are required for plants and animals. Learning about these places helps students to develop nurturing qualities and an appreciation for the value of plants and animals in their community. A virtual field trip provides opportunities for students and teachers of all schools throughout the country to share the same experience. Teaching materials presented with technology allow students to become more engaged in the learning process. A virtual farm is a rich, exciting activity worth exploring with students, since they get the opportunity to view plants and animals in their habitats.

 

Students need to be aware of the links between their homes, the school and the community. Numeracy and literacy skills are also important for students to practise as they interact with people in their community. These skills include being able to measure, count and communicate with people.  Additionally, through the use of visual and performing activities, students will be able to enhance their creativity, whilst they learn more about themselves and their immediate world. Learning to think critically ensures that students will be able to achieve their full potential in the community as they interact with their environment.

 

Outcomes: At the end of this learning experience students will:

1.    Construct simple maps in their immediate environment

2.    Illustrate important buildings and/or landmarks found in their community

3.    Describe the main buildings and landmarks in their community

4.    Construct a landmark of their choice

5.    Write a simple sentence about their landmarks

6.    Count landmarks in model scenario

7.    Demonstrate a willingness to share aspects of their lives with their peers

8.    Use deductive reasoning to define the meaning of safe and unsafe.

9.    Know how to use and interpret simple non-verbal communication

10.  Compare and contrast safe and unsafe places to play at school.

11.  Determine the use of simple media texts (signs/signals) to inform peers of places which are safe and unsafe areas to play at school.

12.  Learn to move safely in space without colliding with others

13.  Create a Safety board displaying pictures of places that are safe and unsafe to play

14.  Model positive behaviour as they participate in class activities

15.  Name examples of places where plants are grown and animals are reared.

16.  Recall features of plants, animals and objects seen in a virtual farm

17.  Distinguish between a virtual field trip and a real field trip

18.  Illustrate what they recall from viewing the virtual field trip

19.  Depict movements of plants, animals and other objects seen in the virtual farm

20.  Categorize habitats based on their components: Terrestrial habitat; Aquatic habitat

21.  Arrange letters of the alphabet based on the  names of animals and plants found in each type of habitat

22.  Create a T chart depicting the number of animals and plants that exist in a two types of habitats

23.  Identify types of habitats and organisms in their home, school or community

24.  Represent a habitat using appropriate materials

25.  Illustrate the type of habitat that is suitable for a specific animal or plant

26.  Complete simple sentences based on the needs of an animal

 

Learning Plans:

 

1.    Landmarks

2.    Safe places to play

3.    Virtual field trip

4.    Habitats

Resources

 

1.    Computer with internet access, multimedia projector

2.    Pictures of Government buildings in Trinidad and Tobago, pictures of safe and unsafe areas to play, pictures of habitats, plants and animals

3.    Stationery materials, 3D objects, art materials for constructing landmarks, cut out of roadway/countryside, toy cars.

4.    School compound (Places include: UNSAFE: washrooms, steps, corridors, classrooms, uneven surfaces, outside the school compound and SAFE: courtyard, savannah), nursery rhyme  Humpty Dumpty

5.    Flashcards

Assessment:

1.    Oral Guided Questioning

2.    Oral presentations

3.    Teacher observation

4.    Rubric to check model landmarks

5.    Checklist to review Safety board ideas

6.    Observation of students working collaboratively and cooperatively

7.    Matching activities

8.    Journal entries

 

 

  UNIT THREE: PLACES IN THE COMMUNITY

Learning Plan: 1 of 4 in total

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Places- Home, School, Community

Duration:    1 day

Topic:  Landmarks    

Context: Students are familiar with their homes and schools.  They have seen buildings or objects whilst on their way to school and some can identify with landmarks in their community. Landmarks serve as identifiable markers for students as they make their way to and from school. They allow students to orient themselves within their immediate community.  

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

1.    provide simple directions to their homes

2.    construct simple maps in their immediate environment

3.    illustrate important buildings and/or landmarks found in their community

4.    describe the main buildings and landmarks in their community

5.    construct a landmark of their choice

6.    write a simple sentence about their landmarks 

  1. count in Spanish, the number of landmarks in the models created
  2. demonstrate a willingness to share aspects of their lives with their peers

 

 Providing directions through oral communication

1.    Students are told by the teacher that he/she would like to visit them at home, but needs to know some of the things that he/she would see along the way to their homes. Students provide directions to their homes through oral communication, giving at least two easily identifiable markers along the way (for example, the markers could be buildings or objects such as a tree, a lamppost or a sign.)

 

Map-making activity

2.    Students are given art materials to draw a simple map from the school to their homes.

3.    Students communicate with each other as they share their maps with their peers. They relate what they drew to their teacher, who records their landmarks on the board. They respond to guided questions by the teacher, on colours, shapes, size of buildings or other objects based on their maps. Students’ responses are recorded on cards on the board.

Exploring Landmarks

4.    Students are introduced to the term ‘Landmark’. They respond to guided questioning by the teacher to understand features of landmarks (for example, the teacher refers to the recorded information that she gathered from the students and asks, ‘Are the buildings/ objects well-known; easily seen?) They are shown a simple definition of what is a landmark. They observe, listen and respond to the teacher as the definition is read.

 

5.    Students view a PowerPoint based on landmarks or are presented with pictures of the main buildings in a community, such as a school, the health centre, fire station, police station and places of worship. They are asked if those buildings are easily seen in their community. They describe the features of the buildings including their size, shape and colour. They discuss with their peers on whether these places are landmarks and why they are important.

 

Making Landmarks for a Road trip

 

6.    Students are told that they need to make their landmarks for a road trip activity. Students select the materials to use; decide on the type of landmark and use art materials to make landmarks based on their drawings .

7.    Students create labels for their landmarks, focusing on upper case letters and neat hand writing.

8.    Students share their models in a whole class activity. They describe the models that they created, indicating why they think their landmarks are important 

9.    Students write a simple sentence about their model landmarks-( they think of a reason why their landmarks are important to them)

10.  Students collaborate in their groups to place landmarks along roadways/routes which are distributed by the teacher. Students respond to questions posed by the teacher based on the position of the landmarks that were placed along the route. They take turns in their groups, to drive model cars along each route, naming and counting landmarks along the way.

 

Resources:  Computer with internet access, multimedia projector, PowerPoint of landmarks such as Government buildings and places of worship), stationery materials, art materials, 3D objects, for constructing landmarks, cut outs of roadway/countryside for road trip activity toy cars.   

 

Assessment:

1.    Oral Guided Questioning- (Teacher tells students that he/she wants to visit them at home and needs to remember his/her way back).  Students volunteer directions using landmarks.

2.    Oral presentations- students are asked to name one landmark that they see near to their school

3.    Checklist to mark students’ participation during throughout all activities

   

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE CHECKLIST

NAME OF CHILD

Oral / Written communication

Map-making activity

Landmark model activity

Participation in groups

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 UNIT THREE: PLACES IN THE COMMUNITY

 

Learning Plan: 2 of 4  in total

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Places: Home, School, Community

Duration:        1 day

Topic:             Safe Places to Play

Context:  This learning plan occurs after students have been taught the rules and responsibilities that must be demonstrated at home and at school. It is necessary to further enhance their previous knowledge with this activity plan, since it builds upon the concept of responsibility as they interact with their environment. Many of our children are accustomed to playing in unsafe areas such as the roadways. Although Infant students require space to expend some of their energy through play, they need to understand that they should do so only in places that are safe to play.

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

 

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

 

 

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

1.    Use deductive reasoning to define the meaning of safe and unsafe.

2.    Know how to use and interpret simple non-verbal communication

3.    Compare and contrast safe and unsafe places to play at school.

4.    Determine the use of simple media texts (signs/signals) to inform peers of places which are safe and unsafe areas to play at school.

5.    Learn to move safely in space without colliding with others

6.    Create a Safety board displaying pictures of places that are safe and unsafe to play.

7.    Model positive behaviour as they participate in class activities.

 

Exploring the terms ‘safe’ and ‘unsafe’

1.    Students are shown the picture and nursery rhyme based on Humpty Dumpty. After they recite the rhyme, they respond to questions from the teacher as they discuss the causes and consequences of Humpty Dumpty’s demise. (For example: Where was Humpty sitting? Was that a good place to sit? Why do you think Mr.Dumpty fell?

2.    Students are introduced to the terms ‘safe /unsafe’.  They participate in a discussion with the teacher as they are asked, ‘Have you ever done anything like Humpty where you could have hurt yourself?’). They brainstorm ideas for the terms ‘Safe/Unsafe’.

 

School tour of safe and unsafe areas to play

3.    Students are asked by the teacher to show the places at school where they usually play. (Teacher and students go outside of the classroom to do this part of the activity). They show examples of where they play. They respond and provide reasons for their answers to questions by the teacher such as, “Why do you like to play here? Can anything bad happen to you while you play here? Is it safe (good) to play outside of the school yard/ on the road?

4.    They are asked to show how to play safely in the school yard. They demonstrate what could happen if they don’t play safely with each other. For example, they could bump into each other and fall.

 

 

Shared reading activity

5.    In class, students and teacher review their outdoor tour. The students name the safe places to play in school and sentences are written by the teacher based on what they say. Students read the sentences aloud as part of a whole class activity. (For example, “A safe (good) place to play at school is in the school yard. It is unsafe (not safe/ bad) to play on the steps/in the washrooms/by the taps/on the corridor/in the road/ on the gravel).

6.    Students express their ideas about one safe area to play and one that is not safe to play, either at home, or in the community.

 

Safety Officer activity

7.    Students work in groups as ‘Safety Officers’, and use art/craft materials to create labels, signals (red colour- unsafe; green colour- safe), and signs with the words ‘Safe’ and ‘Unsafe’. They are supervised by the teacher as they go outside to locate and label safe and unsafe playing areas in the school using signs they created.

·          (Teacher can present students with ‘Safety’ badges for their good ideas.)

Resources:

Nursery Rhyme ‘Humpty Dumpty’; School compound (Places include: UNSAFE: washrooms, steps, corridors, classrooms, uneven surfaces, outside the school compound and SAFE: schoolyard, savannah.), pictures of safe areas to play and unsafe areas at home and in the community, flashcards; safety board chart, safety badges

 

Assessment:

1.  Safety board ideas: Students create cards that show safe or unsafe play areas: Students identify one safe place to play/one place that is unsafe to play and place them on the class Safety Board in the correct categories – Safe / Unsafe).

2.   Worksheet (see sample below)

3.   Art activity: use art / craft materials to draw a safe place for children to play or unsafe areas where children could be harmed.

   

 

 

 

RESOURCES

1.

HUMPTY DUMPTY NURSERY RHYME

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall

Humpty Dumpty had a great fall

All the King’s horses and all the King’s men

Could not put Humpty back together again

                                                                                                                           

 

 

SAFETY BOARD IDEAS

(Students’ art work depicting safe areas to play and unsafe playing areas)

 

 

State whether the following places are safe or unsafe to play.

Name of place

Safe

Unsafe

 

Roadside

 

 

Schoolyard

 

 

Washrooms

 

 

In the classroom

 

 

At a play park

 

 

 

                                                                                                                               

 


 

  UNIT THREE: Places in the Community

Learning Plan: 3 of 4 in total

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Places : Home, School, Community

Duration:        1 day

Topic:             Virtual Field Trip

Context: A virtual field trip provides opportunities for students and teachers of all schools throughout the country to share the same experience. Teaching materials presented with technology allow students to become more engaged in the learning process. Part of the virtual field trip involves a visit to a farm and a market. This is a rich, exciting activity worth exploring with students, since they get the opportunity to view a lesson in a different format.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☐Reading

☒Writing

☒Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

1.    Name examples of places where plants are grown and animals are reared.

2.    Identify places where food from plants and animals is sold.

3.    Name some foods that are obtained from plants and animals.

4.    Identify plants, animals and objects seen in a virtual farm

5.    Identify and count the number of plants and animals seen in the virtual field trip

6.    Draw images of what was seen on the virtual field trip

7.    Depict movements of plants, animals and other objects seen in the virtual farm

Teacher preparation

1.    Multimedia for activity such as the video presentation using computer and projector, or pictures, in the event that there is an absence of multimedia, are prepared by the teacher for students to view a virtual field trip of the community.

 

Viewing of Virtual Farm PowerPoint (see Agricultural Science resource material)

2.    Students are told that they are going on a field trip but are not leaving the school. They have to guess how this will happen. In the video or through the use of pictures, students observe places where plants are grown and animals are reared for food. They observe objects that can be found on a farm such as a tractor, barn, and animal troughs. On the tour, students see places where food is sold, such as the market, the poultry depot and fish market.

 

Interactive session

3.    Students are asked questions by the teacher during pauses in the presentation. For example, how many cows does farmer Bob have? How many vendors are selling mangoes? They are asked to describe what they are seeing, for example, the name of the place where plants are grown or animals are reared; or in the video, the movements and sounds of the animals; the actions of the farm workers in the field and the calls and actions of the vendors that they see.

 

Discussion, Art work and Presentation

4.    At the end of the video/picture walk, students discuss with their peers, what they learnt from the virtual field trip. They are told that the class will create their own picture walk of their field trip experience. 

5.    Students collect art materials to draw aspects of the virtual field trip (such as the farm, animals, plants, objects or workers on the farm, or vendors selling in the market) that they saw in the video or pictures. 

6.    Students participate in a counting activity to state the number of items shown in his/her drawing (for example: I see ___ plants; I see __ animals )

7.    They are encouraged to write a number sentence based on their drawings. These sentences are stuck under each picture to be used as additional reading material in class.

8.    Students’ art pieces are displayed as part of their own virtual field trip.  Students and teacher sing the song Old MacDonald… and refer to the art pieces and number sentences, to state what they saw on the farm.

 

Resources:  Multimedia projector, Agricultural Science Virtual Farm PowerPoint, pictures related to farms, song (Old MacDonald), stationery materials, art /craft materials

Assessment:

1.    Guided questioning

2.    Students participate in a Point and Respond activity, where they use their bodies (as they are pointed to), to mime movements and sounds of animals and objects such as a tractor, a vendor.

3.    Worksheet activities (see next page)

   

 

 

 

SAMPLE WORKSHEET ACTIVITY (1)

Count the number of farm animals in each picture. Write the correct number in the box next to the picture

Farm animal

How many do you see?

Sheep

 

 

 

Horse 

 

       

Chickens

 

 

SAMPLE WORKSHEET ACTIVITY (2)

VIRTUAL FIELD TRIP

1. A place where plants are grown and animals are reared is called a _______________

2. A place where foods from plants and animals are sold is called a  __________________

3. Two structures seen on a farm are ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4. I think a farm is important because ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 


 

  UNIT THREE: Places in the Community

Learning Plan: 4 of 4 in total

Class: Infants Year 1     

Theme:  Places: Home, School, Community

Duration:        2 days

Topic:  Habitats         

Context:

Habitats of plants and animals are found in many places in the community.  These include outdoor areas such as a savannah, backyard garden or fish pond.  In this activity, students will explore two basic habitats: Aquatic and Terrestrial and the components of each type. Learning about these allows students to develop an appreciation for the variety of plants and animals in their community.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☐Literary Appreciation

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

1.    Identify the needs of animals

2.    Categorize habitats based on their components into Terrestrial habitat; Aquatic habitat

3.    Identify places in their community that are examples of terrestrial habitats or aquatic habitats.

4.    Classify animals according to the type of habitat

5.    Identify the number of animals and plants found in each type of habitat

6.    Represent a habitat using appropriate art/craft materials

 

 Discussion of needs of animals

1.    Students are asked to respond to the question, “Do all animals have the same type of home?” Students talk about the types of homes of their pet animals. They discuss what are the important needs of a pet- food, water, shelter

 

 Components of a Terrestrial and Aquatic Habitat

2.    Students are introduced to the terms ‘Terrestrial Habitat’ and ‘Aquatic Habitat’, which the teacher labels on a T-Chart.

3.    Students view a PowerPoint based on each type of habitat or view pictures of habitats and identify the features of each (see CD).

4.    Students identify what they see, and sound the words for the teacher to write on the chart. The exercise is repeated until all of the students’ observations have been written onto the chart by the teacher.

5.    Students use deductive reasoning based on their observation of the built T-Chart to distinguish the components of the two given habitats:

·         Terrestrial- soil, plants, land animals, insect, birds;

·         Aquatic- water, fish, water plants.

6.    Students identify places in their community that could be classified as a terrestrial habitat or an aquatic habitat. These places are labelled on flash cards and put under each category accordingly.

 

 Pair Activity

7.    Students collect pictures of various animals from the teacher. They work in pairs to determine in which habitat each animal belongs. Each pair takes turns to stick the pictures of animals onto the T chart. Students assess each pair’s answer to judge whether or not they matched the pictures to the right categories.

8.    Students collect art and craft materials to create a collage of a selected habitat (Terrestrial or Aquatic)

Resources:

Multimedia, Habitats PowerPoint (see CD), pictures of animals and plants, picture of habitat scene, stationery materials, art/craft materials

 

Search Words

Habitats Trinidad Tobago

Terrestrial

Aquatic

How to make habitat

Assessment:

·         Observation of students working collaboratively and cooperatively

·         Students will be assessed based on their performance in the matching of animals to the correct habitat

·         PowerPoint presentation for assessment purposes

   

 

Sample assessment – (See Habitats PowerPoint presentation).

NAME OF ANIMAL

AQUATIC HABITAT

TERRESTRIAL HABITAT

 

FISH

 

 

BIRD

 

 

SHRIMP

 

 

COW

 

 

INSECT

 

 

CHICKEN