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Standard 2

Land Unit 1

LEARNING UNIT: Physical Features of Trinidad and Tobago – Natural and Artificial

 

Class:  Standard 2  Theme:   My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land                                                                               Estimated frame: 10 days

Context:

 

This unit will teach students about the wealth of Trinidad and Tobago’s natural resources and introduce to them some knowledge about built resources. Students will learn how to care for and love their environment and their country while they learn core skills in various content areas.

Outcomes:

 

At the end of these learning experiences students will:

·         know appropriate listening behaviours and skills of oral expression applicable to level

·         know appropriate listening and speaking behaviours

·         know basic skills in Standard English pronunciation and enunciation

·         apply appropriate phonic skills and strategies in reading

·         apply spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams in reading and writing

·         recall vocabulary knowledge in speaking, reading and writing

·         apply reading skills strategically

·         use research to acquire meaning

·         know how to write cursive through penmanship exercises

·         understand the stages of the process approach in writing: Prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, publishing

·         know how to write two descriptive paragraphs that appeal to the senses using the process approach

·         know how to use spelling rules when writing: Syllabication rules, Phonics, Inflectional Endings

·         know the forms and attributes of poems

·         begin to respond critically to audio texts

·         demonstrate an understanding of the purpose of a variety of media texts

·         develop an understanding of the properties of solids and plane shapes

·         solve problems involving solids and plane shapes

·         explore patterns using solids and plane shapes

·         develop basic map skills

·         develop an appreciation for the physical environment of Trinidad and Tobago

·         develop awareness of built environment of Trinidad and Tobago

·         state the four cardinal points in Spanish

·         relate the stage locations (upstage, downstage, stage right, stage left) to the four cardinal points

·         identify the language of origin of place names in Trinidad and Tobago

·         recognize Spanish language when seen on public signs

·         be aware that different languages were spoken in their country

·         create and paint a relief model using papier-mâché or clay

·         depict melodic contour (shape) of familiar songs/excerpts

·         demonstrate a basic understanding of the phrase ‘respect for the environment’

·         demonstrate a basic understanding of good citizenship

·         give reasons why persons should respect laws governing natural resources.

Learning Plans:

 

1.   Let’s Explore

2.   Natural Landforms

3.   The Man-Made Environment

4.   Finding Places Around Me

5.   Mapping My Environment

Resources:

 

Learning Plan 1: flat and solid shapes of varying sizes, colours, paper, bristol or other recycled board for creating solids, pictures of play-park/playground, community or other buildings.

Learning Plan 2: virtual field trip on resources, pictures of landforms, paper, glue, magazines, crayons, coloured pencils, game (index cards on landforms), score sheet for game template, model and materials for papier-mâché.

Learning Plan 3: pictures/power-point of environment, shapes, pictures of the community in which school is located, pictures of different communities /rural/urban, graphic organiser/check list, worksheet (3 columns), pictures/video showing names of streets and road signs.

Learning Plan 4: bristol board, circle template, markers, crayons or colour pencils, pair of scissors, ruler, pictures, internet, worksheet, simple maps, prizes.

Learning Plan 5: simple maps from the previous learning activity, large map of Trinidad and Tobago, small hard/soft copies of maps, small/large outline maps of Trinidad and Tobago, chart paper, labels, markers, colour pencils, pencils, notebooks, computers and internet.

Assessments:

 

·         Games

·         Oral questioning

·         Portfolio

·         Rubrics

·         Teacher’s checklists

·         Teacher’s observation

·         Worksheet exercises

UNIT ONE: Physical Features of Trinidad and Tobago – Natural and Man-made

Learning Plan: 1 of 5

Class: Standard 2    Term 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 1 day

Topic:  Let’s explore: Shapes around us

Context:

We all use shapes as a way of identifying and organizing visual information. Very early, children begin to make a connection between familiar objects and their shapes. When students explore different shapes, they are using one of the most basic educational processes – the observation of same and different. Students can be provided with an opportunity to observe, compare and discuss all that they see with reference to its relationship with shapes.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE

Effective Communication

Creative Thinking

 

Literacy

☐Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☒Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         name solid and plane shapes used to create compound shapes (pictorial representation)

·         solve problems involving solids and plane shapes

·         insert the missing elements in given patterns (concrete or pictorial) and explain the reasoning

·         describe a given pattern (repeating) determine the pattern rule and extend the pattern using concrete materials or pictorial representation

·         create repeating, increasing and decreasing patterns using solids or plane shapes (concrete and pictorial) and explain the pattern

·         use their body to create shapes(carve shapes using their bodies)

·         create picture of land features using shapes

·         create a model of the environment using three dimensional shapes

·         create mental images based on given stimuli (pictures, videos, stories, shapes)

·         use appropriate verbal and non-verbal language features to communicate effectively

·         engage in conversations and other formal interactions using Standard English.

Activities:

Shapes and Patterns

1.    The teacher can read a story (web search – videos about shapes such as triangles) or create a story about shapes to introduce this activity.

2.    Students identify from a group of shapes those that are flat and solid shapes. Students write the names of shapes on slips of paper and stick on the shapes.  

3.    Students recall the properties of shapes as they identify them.

4.    Students chat about patterns with which they are familiar. Students complete patterns created by the teacher using these shapes (flat and solid). E.g. Cone, Pyramid, Cube, ___, Pyramid, Cube.

Students describe and explain the pattern rule. They also create their own patterns, using concrete materials or pictorial representations.
Different patterns can be created which are more complex depending on the level of students. (Teacher created worksheet or patterns on slips of paper can also be used. See Sample Worksheet 1)

Shapes in the Environment

5.    Students are presented with a picture of a play park/playground or scene with which they will be familiar. (This scene is made up of flat and solid shapes and can be real or abstract.)

6.    Students identify the shapes they see as flat or solid.

7.    Students view pictures of communities or buildings and identify the patterns that are seen referring to shapes.

8.    Students identify things in the environment as natural or man-made which can take the form of different shapes.

9.    Teacher elicits other natural and man-made things in the environment which can be represented using shapes.

10. Alternative Activity: In groups, students can draw an environment using shapes to represent natural and man-made elements.

Modelling Shapes

11.  Student make shapes using their hands.

12. They join with other students to form the solids as well as large flat shapes.

Creating A Model of the School or Community

13. In groups, students create a model of a house, their school or immediate environment using solids.

14. In groups students also create an art piece depicting the environment using flat shapes only.

15. Groups present their complete pieces via oral presentations of what their model represents.

16. Discussions, questions and answer session follow.

 

 

Resources:

·         flat and solid shapes of varying sizes, colours

·         paper, bristol or other recycled board for creating solids,

·         pictures of play park/playground, community or other buildings

 

Assessment:

·         Oral questioning

·         Rubric for Model of Community (See Rubrics in Toolkit)

·         Rubric for Art Piece Using Shapes

 

   

 

 

 

 

Example of simple models of shapes in the environment

Making a model of the home, school or community using solid shapes.

 

 

What patterns do you see within these housing projects?

 

 

  cuboid, cuboid

 

  cuboid, cuboid, triangular prism

 

 

 

 cuboid, cuboid, cuboid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sample Worksheet  1

Completing Patterns Using Solid Shapes

  1. Complete the pattern by drawing the next two solid shapes.

 

 

 

 

­­­­_____   _____

                                                            

  1. Draw what you think the next two buildings would look like if you continue building using the pattern of the first two.

 

 

 

 

  1. Observe the pattern and comment

 

UNIT ONE: Physical Features of Trinidad and Tobago – Natural and Artificial

Learning Plan: 2 of   5

Class: Standard 2 Term 1

Theme:  My Country: the Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 1 day

Topic:  Natural Landforms

Context: There are many different landforms in Trinidad and Tobago. They are shaped by forces deep within the planet and by conditions on the earth’s surface. In this learning plan, students will learn about the some natural landforms in Trinidad and Tobago. They will be given the opportunity to learn how to appreciate their natural environment.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE:
Critical Thinking

Choose an item.

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience, students will:

·         describe basic landforms (mountains, ranges, hills, valleys, peninsulas, swamps and plains in Trinidad and Tobago)

·         describe in two or three sentences what each of these features represent

·         describe in a paragraph and using illustrations,  features of basic landforms

·         describe ways in which respect for the environment can be demonstrated

·         create a model replica of landforms of Trinidad and Tobago on a flat surface 

·         create mental images based on given stimuli

·         connect stimuli to personal and collective experiences

·         follow and provide relatively complex directions and instructions

·         make presentations and other formal interactions using Standard English with attention to Standard English pronunciation

·         use appropriate verbal and non – verbal language features to communicate effectively.

 

Activities:

Virtual Field Trip

1.    Students view photos (digital or printed) depicting the landforms in Trinidad and Tobago.

2.    Students discuss the landforms seen. They are placed in groups and given pictures of the various landforms to discuss and identify.

 

Distinguishing Landforms

3.    Teacher provides reading material based on landforms. Students read and discuss features of each type of landform. Teacher guides discussion to ensure that students note the distinct characteristics of each landform and are able to distinguish among them. The discussion is extended to include ways in which respect can be shown for land and landforms.

 

Game – Name the Landform (matching game)

4.    Students are placed in teams. They are given index cards created with the name of the landforms, definitions of the landforms and pictures (see game templates 1 and 2).  They are asked to move around and find the persons that match their card. They are to be in groups with the name, definition and picture of each landform.   The first group to complete the correct pairing wins. Teacher gives the rest of the class time to find their pairs they then present their groupings to the class by presenting the name, picture and definition of each landform.

 

Mini Landform Books

5.    Students create mini books in which they write the name and definition of each landform along with a drawing for it on the pages. Students can either draw or use pictures of landforms from magazines or print form online.

 

Creation of a Model Depicting Landform

6.    Students are placed in groups and given materials to create a model of landforms of Trinidad and Tobago

7.    Create their own island using different landforms

8.    Students are individually assigned task to create a model of a landform given to them. Students are assigned the task to research their landform either in the library or on the internet and write a paragraph on it. Landforms with paragraph written is presented by each student to the class and then placed in a display corner set up in the classroom. (the information will be provided to students if they don’t have access to internet or a library)

 

Resources:

·         ICTs: virtual field trip on resources

·         Stationery: paper, glue, crayons, coloured pencils

·         Literature: magazines

·         Others: pictures of landforms, game  (index cards on landforms), score sheet for game template, model materials for papier-mâché

 

Assessment:

·         Oral questioning / refer to rubric from rubric folder  

·         Participation rubric in general rubrics

·         Rubric model presentation

   

 

GAME TEMPLATE 1

WORDS

 

MOUNTAIN

 

HILL

 

VALLEY

 

RANGE

 

PLAIN

 

SWAMP

 

PENINSULA

 

 

LANDFORM PICTURES

 

MOUNTAIN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HILL

 

 

VALLEY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLAIN

RANGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SWAMP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PENINSULA

 

 

 

GAME TEMPLATE 2

DEFINITION OF LANDFORMS

 

Mountain

A natural elevation of the earth’s surface having considerable mass, generally steep sides and a height greater than that of a hill

 

Hill

A well-defined natural elevation smaller than a mountain

 

Swamp

A lowland region saturated by water

 

Range

A series of more or less connected mountains ranged in a line 

 

Valley 

An elongated lowland between ranges of mountains, hills or other uplands often having a river or stream running along the bottom

 

Peninsula

A narrow strip of land projecting into a sea or lake from the mainland

 

RUBRIC

General Rubric for Visual Arts Stand Alone Learning Activities

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Appearance of Project

The project’s appearance is professional and polished without distractive elements

The project’s appearance is quite professional and polished with few distractive elements

The Project’s appearance is somewhat poor with some distractive elements

The Project’s appearance is quite poor with many distractive elements

Content Facts

The Project content is exemplary and suggests the student has discovered the important ideas of the topic

The Project content is good and suggests the student has discovered most of the important facts of the topic

The Project content is fair/poor and suggests the student has not discovered most of the important facts

The Project content is poor and suggests the student has not done sufficient research

Images and Models

All images or models are effective

Most of the  models or images are effective

Some images or models are effective

Too few images or models are used to be an effective presentation

Style and Organization

Display is interesting and attractive. Materials are complete and organized to present the ideas well

Display is interesting and attractive. Most of the materials are complete and well organized. Presentation has sequence and plan evident

Some parts of the display are interesting and attractive. Some materials are complete and well organized. Presentation has some sequence and plan evident

Display is uninteresting and untidy. Materials are incomplete and not organized. Presentation has no sequence or plan evident

Creativity and Appearance

Project is excellently presented reflecting creativity and a lot of thought

Project is neat and shows evidence of time spent on it. Good creative effort

Project is neat and some attempt is made to present it well

Project has sloppy appearance and little or no attempt is made to present it well

Knowledge

The project demonstrates a thorough knowledge of the idea/ topic investigated

The project demonstrates good knowledge of the idea/ topic investigated

The project demonstrates some knowledge of the idea/ topic investigated

The project demonstrates very little knowledge of the idea/ topic investigated

 

 

SCORE SHEET FOR GAME

  1. Every correct answer you get 10 points
  2. Partially correct 5 points (teacher’s discretion)
  3. Totally incorrect off the topic 0 points and question is passed to the next team

 

 

UNIT ONE: Physical Features of Trinidad and Tobago- Natural and Artificial

Learning Plan: 3 of   5

Class: Standard 2    Term 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land     

Duration:

Topic:  The Built Environment

Context:

As young children busily interact with their environment, they may or may not stop to pay attention to the fact that it is made up of both natural and built features. Also, they may or may not recognize that there are particular differences between rural and urban areas. It is important that they make these distinctions early on so that they can understand how circumstances within different communities can have positive or negative effects on the environment. 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE:
Creative Thinking

 

 

Literacy

☐Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☐Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☒Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

 At the end of this learning experience students will:   

·         distinguish between the natural and artificial environment

·         differentiate between urban and rural settlements using a graphic organizer

·         create mental images based on given stimuli

·         connect stimuli to personal and collective experiences

·         name the cities, four or five major towns and villages, and the major roads and highways in Trinidad and Tobago

·         identify the language of origin of place names in Trinidad and Tobago

·         categorize names of places in their country according to their language of origin

·         recognize Spanish language when seen on public signs.

 

Activities:

 

Natural or Built

1.    Teacher reviews the term ‘natural landforms’ and asks students to identify things in their environment that are not part of this category. Teacher elicits a category name for things that are not a natural part of the environment.

2.    Students view pictures/PowerPoint of the environment. Teacher asks students to identify whether the places are part of the natural or built environment.

3.    In pairs, students make a list of five things in the natural environment and five things in the built/artificial environment.

 

 

Exploring and building my community/the built environment

4.    Students use shapes to create models of buildings in their immediate environment with which they are familiar. (home, school, church, etc.). These models will be used to represent the layout of the school community.

5.    They identify and discuss the characteristics of the models and buildings in general (roof, windows, doors, walls, general shape, etc.).

6.    Students identify the distinguishing features of their community including buildings and landmarks.

 

Rural and urban communities

7.    Teacher presents pictures of the community in which the school is located.

8.    Through guided questioning, teacher allows students to describe other communities they may have visited.

9.    Pictures of different communities (rural and urban) are displayed and students are asked to identify differences.

10. Through guided discussion the teacher allows students to distinguish between the terms “rural and urban”.

11. Students categorise the characteristics of rural and urban communities on a graphic organiser and use it as a checklist to determine if a community is rural or urban.

 

Identifying places

12. Teacher engages students in discussion to elicit names of cities, towns, villages, major roads and highways in Trinidad and Tobago. Teacher communicates further information as necessary.

13. Using a graphic organiser, students categorize the names of the major towns, cities, villages, major roads and highways in Trinidad and Tobago.

 

The origin of place names

14.  Teacher prompts a discussion about the origin of place names in Trinidad and Tobago. (e.g. Why is our capital named Port of Spain?/From what language or country do you think the name Scarborough/Buccoo originated?). Teacher guides students to access their prior knowledge of the history of Trinidad and Tobago done in Standard 1 and allows them to acknowledge the language of the first peoples as well as that of the people who came to our shores. The teacher writes the name each language identified on the board. They include Amerindian, Spanish, African, French, Dutch, English, Hindi, Arabic.

15. Additional names of places in Trinidad and Tobago are explored to identify the language of origin.

16. The teacher selects any 6 of the languages above and assigns students the home work task to find two place names in Trinidad and Tobago that are of that language of origin.

17. Teacher provides students with copies of a worksheet with two columns. For example:

 

Names of Places

In Trinidad and Tobago

Language of Origin

San Fernando

Spanish

 

 

 

Students share the place names and the corresponding language of origin with their class mates. Care is taken to pronounce and spell the places accurately.

 

Street names

Writing exercise:                         

19.  Students engage in writing about their experiences in this learning plan: sentences, a paragraph, a poem, a jingle.

 

Resources:

·         ICTs: Pictures/ power-point of environment, pictures showing names of streets and road signs.

·         Others: shapes, pictures of the community in which school is located, pictures of different communities /rural/urban, graphic organiser/check list, worksheet (3 columns)

 

Assessment:

·         Oral questioning

·         Rubric for the construction of models

·         Worksheet exercises

·         Graphic organiser to create

·         Participation rubric

·         Teacher’s observation

 

   

 

Rubric for the construction of models

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Appearance of Project

The project’s appearance is professional and polished without distractive elements

The project’s appearance is quite professional and polished with few distractive elements

The Project’s appearance is somewhat poor with some distractive elements

The Project’s appearance is quite poor with many distractive elements

Images and Models

All images or models are effective

Most of the  models or images are effective

Some images or models are effective

Too few images or models are used to be an effective presentation

Style and Organization

Display is interesting and attractive. Materials are complete and organized to present the ideas well

Display is interesting and attractive. Most of the materials are complete and well organized. Presentation has sequence and plan evident

Some parts of the display are interesting and attractive. Some materials are complete and well organized. Presentation has some sequence and plan evident

Display is uninteresting and untidy. Materials are incomplete and not organized. Presentation has no sequence or plan evident

Creativity and Appearance

Project is excellently presented reflecting creativity and a lot of thought

Project is neat and shows evidence of time spent on it. Good creative effort

Project is neat and some attempt is made to present it well

Project has sloppy appearance and little or no attempt is made to present it well

Knowledge

The project demonstrates a thorough knowledge of the idea/ topic investigated

The project demonstrates good knowledge of the idea/ topic investigated

The project demonstrates some knowledge of the idea/ topic investigated

The project demonstrates very little knowledge of the idea/ topic investigated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graphic organiser for classification of rural and urban areas in Trinidad and Tobago.

 

Rural Communities

 

 

Urban Communities

 

Features

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Features

 

 

Examples

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Examples

 

 

Origin of place names in Trinidad and Tobago Worksheet

 

Names of Places

In Trinidad and Tobago

 

Language of Origin

 

Country of Origin

San Fernando

Spanish

Spain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNIT ONE: Physical Features of Trinidad and Tobago – Natural and Artificial

Learning Plan: 4 of   5

Class: Standard 2    Term 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 3 days

Topic:  Finding Places Around Me

Context:

Learning about directions and the cardinal points are the beginning concepts of map skills. In this learning activity, students review content done at Infants Two, learn more about their immediate environment using the four main cardinal points and, develop skills in other content areas.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE:
Cooperation

Effective Communication

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         create a model of a compass, indicating the four main cardinal points

·         state the four main cardinal points in Spanish

·         locate four main areas of a stage

·         state reasons why knowledge of cardinal points is important

·         define the term ‘map’

·         follow and provide relatively complex directions and instructions to locate places

·         engage in conversations and other formal interactions using Standard English pronunciation and, high-frequency and content-specific words  to create and express meaning (near to, far from, to the left/right , to the [east, west, north, south] of etc.)

·         reproduce correct cursive writing patterns, formation, spacing and neatness in their writing

·         use media and technology equipment with care

·         read fluently with appropriate volume, correct pronunciation and clear enunciation, to convey the meaning of the text to the reader and to an audience

·         use transitional words and phrases to link sentences in their writing

·         apply the writing process to compose a paragraph.

Activities:

Creating and labelling a compass: Two simple compasses can be made

Review of Infant 2 outcomes

1.    Teacher provides materials/students bring materials to create the model of the compass. Teacher guides the activity; students create individually or in pairs. Students can be shown several examples of compasses from pictures or real ones.

2.    Students are guided to insert four cardinal points (North, South, East, West); “How do we represent each direction in a short way?” (By using the first letter – North – N etc).

3.    Spanish: Students listen to and repeat the Spanish words for the 4 points –

north – norte

south – sur

east – este

west – oeste

  As they say the Spanish they indicate the direction by pointing or turning their bodies.

4.  Students play a game similar to ‘In the River, On the Bank.’ They stand in a line. The cardinal point is called in Spanish. The student turns his/ her body in the direction called. If he/ she turns incorrectly he/ she is deemed to be out. Whoever manages to turn accurately on each occasion is the winner.

5.    Students are taken outside, with their model of a compass to identify the four main cardinal points. Teacher can use a real compass to locate North’s landmark. Students identify and discuss the following:

§  a landmark in their environment that indicates North

§  reasons for knowing about the cardinal points:

§  to develop a sense of direction

§  to understand and provide directions

§  for map reading

§  to understand signs

(Points above can be written in student’s book; compass can be stuck after it is used.)

 

Locating main buildings and landmarks on a: large-scale map (drawn in the school yard) AND on a simple map on paper

(Internet can be used; aerial pictures of their school and community can be used to make the concept less abstract.)

5.    Outdoor activity: Students are taken on a trek around their school’s compound to identify landmarks in all four directions; they are provided with paper on which their ‘present location’ is identified – their school. Alternatively, students can be taken on a mini-field trip/walk around their community.

6.    Main buildings/landmarks are identified on the large-scale map by students moving over the map; students stand at given locations and state the directions they move to as they locate places. If the simple paper map is used, buildings are drawn/pictures are stuck. The model of the compass from Activity #1 can be used for this activity.

Remember to use Spanish words for directions.

7.    Students list names of main buildings or landmarks in their school’s community which they would use in this activity; names of the buildings are written by teacher and students. Teacher guides the activity ensuring that students use the model of the compass made previously and the appropriate language – (E.g. “The police station is located to the south of our school. Can we locate this on our map?”)

8.    Students are engaged in an activity to locate four main areas of a stage.

 

Treasure hunt (Can be used as an assessment)

9.    Students are grouped and given simple maps of their school; there are written directions and instructions that indicate where their treasure will be found. All maps lead to the same location.

10. Groups engage in their hunt using the maps. Their written directions are relatively complex. Prizes are to be awarded for every group who finishes the hunt (in the given time).

 

Let’s take some pictures

12. Students have been taught techniques needed to handle and use a simple digital camera. (Refer to ELA mini-lesson on using a digital camera.)

13. Homework assignment:  Students are given a guide list of buildings and other landmarks in their community to capture still shots of (depending on availability of resources – cameras and phones can be used). Pictures are brought back to school (soft or hard copies of pictures). A picture of their house can be included. Pictures are used to create picture maps. Where cameras are not available, students may cut photos out of newspapers or magazines.

 

Speaking about it

14. Students are given a forum to talk about their learning experiences surrounding this learning activity:

§  Their talk will lead to the writing activity.

§  Students are grouped (perhaps 3-4 to a group) and provided with a guide which will lead their discussions (Teacher will determine the guide, for instance, will each group talk about certain aspects or will every group talk about the same aspects).

§  Students are reminded about the skills and techniques associated with presentations/talking to a group (use of Standard English, appropriate pronunciation and enunciation, body language etc.); teacher/students demonstrate. (Teacher can insert an ELA mini-lesson if necessary).

§  Groups present for about 3-5 minutes according to a pre-determined format; students could have been given guides/rubrics for the presentation and can assess peers’ presentations.

 

Writing and reading about it

15. This writing and reading activity follows-up from the activity above. What was discussed and presented should inform student’s writing piece. Students are being taught how to use the process approach to compose at least two descriptive paragraphs. (Students should have had an ELA mini-lesson on ‘The Process Approach to Writing’ AND ‘Transitional words and phrases in writing’.)

16. Teacher demonstrates how to use points/brainstormed ideas, the process approach and transitional words and phrases; he/she creates sentences to build a cohesive paragraph.

17. Teacher demonstrates the skills associated with fluent reading and reading for an audience; students use their paragraphs as the text for their read-aloud.

Ø  The paragraphs can be used as the text for comprehension exercises – literal and inferential type questions.

 

Resources:

Materials for circle compass:

(Words for cardinal points are to be used)

·         Bristol board for circle

·         Circle template OR plate to trace shape

·         Markers, crayons or colour pencils

·         Pair of scissors

·         Ruler

 

Materials for ‘line’ compass:

·         Bristol board for strips

·         Glue or stapler

·         Markers, crayons or colour pencils

·         Pair of scissors

·         Ruler

 

Materials for simple map:

·         Internet – if available

·         Markers, crayons or colour pencils

·         Pictures – aerial still shots of community from Google earth

·         Simple, small pictures to represent main buildings

·         Worksheet with school’s location identified

 

Materials for treasure hunt:

·         Simple maps with written instructions and directions for each team

·         Prizes for teams/team members

 

Assessment:

·         Assessment game: At the end of activity #2

·         Read aloud checklist

·         Teacher’s observations

·         Treasure hunt: Activity #3

·         Writing activity: Refer to writing rubric

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Possible template for creating the model of the simple compass

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A simple 4 point compass

 

 

 

 

 

 

A simple 4 point compass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                

 

Content-specific vocabulary and phrases include:

  1. cardinal points
  2. north, south, east, west
  3. map
  4. directions
  5. located
  6. near to
  7. far from
  8. landmark/landmarks
  9. to the [south/north/east/west] of
  10. Spanish vocabulary: norte, sur, este, oeste
  11. names of main buildings around school and in their community – police station, health centre, other schools etc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name: _______________________________________

Date: _______________    Class:__________________

 

Creating a simple map

 

YOU ARE HERE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                     

 

 

Teachers can modify the words and tune if necessary.

 

Cardinal Points Song to the tune of I went to a party, I went to a fair.

 

 

North South Jingle

 

I went for ice-cream (item can be substituted)

When I went to the beach

I need to learn directions

So this song Miss/Sir will teach

 

So….

Turn to the north

Turn to the south

Turn to the east

Turn to the west

 

Close your eyes and turn to the point you love the best

 

 

Spanish Version (to remember Spanish cardinal points)

 

I went to the library

I need to a search

I must find directions

So I Google my research

 

So…

Turn to norte

Turn to sur

Turn to este

Turn to oeste

 

 

Open your eyes and see who you met

 

UNIT ONE: Physical Features of Trinidad and Tobago – Natural and Artificial

Learning Plan: 5 of   5

Class: Standard 2    Term 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 3 days

Topic:  Mapping My Country

Context:

Map reading is a life skill that helps us to add a sense of direction and position to our physical environment in relation to others in our physical world. Developing basic map skills in young children will enable them to acquire this sense of direction and position and will provide a foundation for developing further map reading skills in the future.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE:
Effective Communication

Cooperation

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         identify basic features of a map: title, key, compass, and borders

·         describe what each of these features represent (title, key, compass, and border)

·         use content-specific words to create and express meaning

·         develop research skills to interpret symbols, signs, charts and (simple) graphs/maps

·         interpret content in print,/visual and media (maps)

·         name and locate on a map of Trinidad and Tobago: mountain ranges, plains, rivers, swamps, surrounding water bodies, rural and urban areas, major cities and/towns, major roads and highways

·         develop an appreciation for the natural physical environment of Trinidad and Tobago

·         use the process approach in writing.

 

Activities:

 

Developing map skills

1.    Students use simple maps from the previous learning activity to identify title, compass, key and border. Students are engaged in a discussion to as to the function of each of these features on maps.

2.     Teacher displays a large map of Trinidad and Tobago and guides students to locating copies of same in their atlases. Alternatively, students can view a soft copy provided by the teacher, or on the internet. Students are guided to locate and further investigate the title, key, compass and borders. Students then share their thoughts and simple definitions for each feature are crafted.

3.    On the large map of Trinidad and Tobago, teacher sticks arrows pointing to the four features discussed. Teacher then calls upon different students to place the labels title, key, compass and border against the arrows. Students do the same on individual copies provided. Next to the label, they write simple definitions for each of the features. In pairs, they read their definitions to each other.   

Let’s locate it!

4.    Students are engaged in full exploration of the key/legend on the map of Trinidad and Tobago. Teacher questions students about the colour code in terms of mountain ranges and plains. Students identify where these ranges and plains are located on the map. Peers are encouraged to assist those who have difficulties.

5.    On individual outline maps, students colour in the mountain ranges and plains. (Alternatively, students do this activity on the computer).

6.    Using additional outline maps, the entire procedure in 4 and 5 above is repeated to locate:

·         rivers, swamps, surrounding water bodies

·         rural and urban areas, major cities, towns and (including their own)

·         major roads and highways in Trinidad and Tobago.

(Each of the maps can be done on different days)

All work is placed in student portfolios.

Pending the availability of space (yard/floor space), a large outline map of Trinidad and Tobago is drawn on the floor/ground. Teacher groups students and assigns a number name. As a group’s number and the name of a physical feature are called, the group must enter the map and correctly represent the feature by standing in the correct position/s.

 

Care and appreciation for our environment

7.    Students are put into two large groups. Each group is given chart paper and markers. One group focuses on natural landforms and the other on the man-made/built environment. In their groups, they discuss ways in which citizens can show care and appreciation for these. Using a graphic organiser, each group charts their ideas. Teacher circulates posing guided questions/scaffolding as necessary.

8.    Groups make oral presentations. Charts are then displayed on the classroom wall.

Independent writing activity

9.     Students are guided in the use of the process approach to write a piece on ‘Caring for our environment’.

Resources:

·         ICTs: computers, internet

·         Others: simple maps from the previous learning activity, large map of Trinidad and Tobago, small hard/soft copies of maps, small/large outline maps of Trinidad and Tobago, labels

·         Stationery: chart paper, markers, colour pencils, pencils, notebooks

 

Assessment:

·         Cooperation and collaboration checklist

·         Oral communication skills checklist

·         Participation rubric

·         Portfolio Assessment

·         Rubric for descriptive writing         

 

   

 

Outline map of Trinidad and Tobago

 

 

 

 

Land Unit 3

LEARNING UNIT: Uses of Land: Residential and Industrial

Class:  Standard Two        Theme:   My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Estimated frame:    2 weeks and 2 days

 

Context:

 

The land available to us can be used in various ways. With the current trends of development land both in rural and urban areas are being used up for residential and industrial needs. In this unit students will explore these developments and the effects of the uses of land for residential and industrial purposes. Students will also have an opportunity to go on a field trip where they themselves can see development taking place in rural or urban areas.

 

Outcomes:

 

At the end of this learning unit students will:     

·         understand that land use is influenced by individuals’ needs as well as by the law

·         recognize signs written in Spanish

·         appreciate that Spanish language is important to contemporary Trinidad and Tobago

·         count sequentially within 1 000

·         represent equality and inequality using manipulatives, pictures and symbols and using equivalent relationships

·         use the concept of equality to solve problems involving addition and subtraction with one unknown

·         develop an understanding of the comparison of measures

·         demonstrate appropriate techniques when measuring

·         solve problem involving measures

·         adhere to the dress code practices while participating in physical activities

·         assess the importance of minerals

·         begin to deepen their understanding of the term “property”

·         demonstrate a basic understanding of the terms: property, sustainability and “respect for the environment”.

·         write friendly letters using a process approach, including the address on an envelope

·         add prefixes and suffixes to root words to make and use new words in context

·         recall vocabulary knowledge in speaking, reading and writing

·         read to learn

·         use research to acquire meaning.

 

Learning Plans

 

1.    Housing and Industrial Land Use

2.    Measuring Length

3.    Resources of our Land

4.    Let Us Write!

5.    Know Your Country

 

Resources:

 

Learning Plan 1: video showing various ways land is used, audio materials (from School Broadcasting Unit), CD player, computers, cameras, projector/DVD player and television set, video/slide show based on land use in Trinidad and Tobago, song copies, pictures showing various ways land is used, materials for making a picture book, pencils and notebooks.

Learning Plan 2: paper strips (30cm and 1m), rulers, metre sticks and trundle wheel.

Learning Plan 3: worksheets, puzzles, KWL charts, play dough, foil paper, colour pencils, copper wire, paper, black poster paint, pictures, videos, Information Sheet (for teacher), atlases, copies of outline maps of Trinidad and Tobago.

Learning Plan 4: envelopes and stamps, TT Post envelopes for posting letters, different stamps used in Trinidad and Tobago, search key words ‘interactive letter writing game’, ‘writing letters for 8 year olds’ etc., Katherine S. McKnight, The Teachers’ Big Book of Graphic Organizers. Jossey-Bass Teacher, CA. 2010. The World Wide Web, pictures applicable for LEA activities, posters, pictures of everyday signs and letter template.

Learning Plan 5: notebooks, pencils, journals, colour pencils, pictures, computer, projector, reading comprehension passage with questions, quiz question cards, atlases and copies of outline maps of Trinidad and Tobago.

 

Assessments:

 

·         Checklist/rubric for picture book 

·         Expository Writing Rubric 

·         Journaling

·         Know Your Country Quiz

·         Learning logs

·         Map work exercise

·         Map work exercise

·         Observation

·         Observation/Participation checklist

·         Oral questions

·         Oral/Written Questions

·         Participation rubric

·         Reading Comprehension worksheet

·         Rubric for Creative Writing Piece

·         Rubric for Imaginative Writing

·         Student checklists

·         Student Portfolio

·         Worksheets

 

 UNIT THREE: Uses of Land: Residential and Industrial

Learning Plan: 1 of   6

Class: Standard 2  Term: 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 2 days

Topic:  Housing and Industrial Land Use

Context:

Land use is essential for human existence. Land is used for almost every aspect of our lives. People’s use of land is essential for homes and industry construction but should be done in such a way that the environment is not destroyed.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:

Critical Thinking

Choose an item.

 

Literacy

RReading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

☐ Literary Appreciation

R Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

R Problem Solving

☐ Critical thinking

R Communication

R Representation

R Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         state four types of land use

·         give two or three reasons why the land is used for housing and industry

·         analyse in one paragraph the choice of selection for using land for housing and industry

·         count sequentially within 1 000

·         determine whether two sides of a given number sentence are equal or not equal using manipulatives, drawings and counting

·         count forward (count on) and backward (count back) by ones within 1 000 from any given number

·         define in 1-2 written sentences the terms ‘property’ and ‘sustainability’

·         cite 2-3 benefits of respect for law.

 

Activities:

 

Discussion /Picture Viewing on Land Use

1.    Students are engaged in discussion about why people use land and for what purpose. Students are shown pictures of various ways land is used for residential and industrial purposes and are asked to identify what purpose the land was used for in the various pictures.

 

Identifying Housing and Industrial Land Use

2.    Students view video (if possible) or pictures depicting land being used for various purposes. They discuss in groups the various land use seen in the pictures and videos in the previous activities and create a list of land used for housing and industrial purposes as depicted in the media.

3.    Students discuss what property and sustainability means in relation to land use for housing and agriculture.  They explore the term “property” in relation to ownership of land and the term “sustainability in relation to sustaining the land in terms of minimal damage when clearing the land for building homes and industries.  

Students present their findings.

Students view video on land use for housing and industrialisation, and discuss the reasons for using land for such.

 

Rural /Urban Industrialisation

4.    Students use map from unit 1 and locate on the map a few industries located in the rural and urban areas of Trinidad and Tobago.

 

N.B.

5.    Reference is made to the following as well as any others that they see fit: industrialisation may occur in rural as well as urban areas.  

 

Rural and Urban Settlement

6.    Students are given a map to depict rural and urban settlement as it occurs throughout the country. Students use a key to represent the rural and urban settlements.

 

House numbers / Mailbox numbers

7.    Student is given the task for homework to note the numbers of the houses and mailboxes on their street.  

The numbers are placed on the whiteboard by the teacher

Students manipulate numbers to demonstrate counting forward and backward (count on and count back)

Students are given a variety of numbers one, two digits and three digits numbers to manipulate in this format.

 

Equality And Inequality

8.    Students are guided in structuring manipulatives to represent houses on both sides of a street to show equality and inequality in numbers. This can be based on the street on which they live. Students also make comparison among the number of people living in their homes to investigate equality and inequality.

9.    Students represent their findings numerically and in words using the signs for equality or inequality.  

e.g. Street A  5+6=11         Street B  7+4=11

Number of houses on Street A = Number of houses on Street B

 

 

Respect of Law /Creation of Laws

10. Students discuss the laws relating to the destruction of the natural environment:

(i)            when the land has to be cleared to build houses.

(ii)          in relation to the extraction of minerals for human use for example quarrying of the land which damages the environment.

11. Students are given pictures in groups of land being cleared to construct industries and houses and being mined for minerals. They discuss and write a short presentation on what they see being depicted in the picture in relation to destruction of the environment and what they think are the benefits of respecting the law where destruction of the environment in relation to clearing the land for houses, buildings and industry is concerned.    

 

Resources:

·         I.C.T. : Videos, pictures

·         Others: Models of houses and industrial building or representatives of same   

 

Assessment:

·         Observation Checklist

·         Rubric

 

   

 

UNIT THREE: Uses of Land – Residential and Industrial

Learning Plan: 2 of   6

Class: Standard 2  Term: 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land     

Duration: 3 hours

Topic:  Measuring Length

Context:

The concept of linear measure is important for estimating and stating lengths and distances. Students will use the metre and centimetre to measure objects in their immediate surroundings and recognise these as the standard unit for measuring length as well as commonly used units.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:

Cooperation

 

 

Literacy

☐Reading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

☐ Literary Appreciation

☐ Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

R Problem Solving

R Critical thinking

R Communication

R Representation

R Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         select the appropriate unit of measure when measuring objects of varying lengths and explain the suitability of the unit

·         estimate lengths of objects in metres and verify lengths by measuring

·         explain the reasonableness of estimations

·         draw lines of various lengths

·         state the relationship between the metre and the centimetre

·         convert metres to centimetres

·         solve problems in real-life involving length/measurement. 

 

Activities:

Scenario: best unit for measurement

1.    Students make two strips, one 30 cm in length and the other 1 metre long. They are placed in groups of five and given the task of determining which unit is suitable for measuring the length of various objects around the school/classroom. (E.g. length of desk, classroom, door, blackboard/whiteboard, corridor, playground/yard, school building, copy book, pencil, eraser, finger, stick of chalk, etc.)

2.    Students present their views on the units of measure used, to identify which was suitable for measuring the length of the corresponding object e.g. door- metre/ longer strip, book-smaller strip, length of classroom- metre strip, length of yard- metre strip, etc. (a table can be constructed for recording measurements and comparisons made between use of arbitrary and standard units).

Estimation and Verification

3.     In the yard or in an area of the school, pairs of students stand facing each other with varying space between them. They are asked to estimate the space and then measure the space using a meter stick. Students can also use the trundle wheel to measure distances if available.  Measurements are recorded and findings are discussed. Students discuss the estimations in relation to the actual length of the distances. Students pay particular attention to the following: 

–  was my estimation way off?

–  was my estimation closer to the actual length?

Using metre and centimetre

4.    Teacher distributes rulers and metre sticks to students. Students are asked to place rulers along the metre stick and state/discuss their observations.

5.    Students then determine the number of cm in a metre (100 cm = 1 m). Students are engaged in practical activities involving conversion of metres to centimetres. They can then be given worksheets to do conversion of metres to centimetres and centimetres to metres. (1m= __cm, 2m =__cm…50cm=1/2m, 25cm=1/4m.)

Application of measurement

6.    Students using rulers and paper, are guided to draw lines of different lengths, with emphasis placed on starting from the zero mark and ending on number, e.g. 5 cm

7.    In pairs, students draw lines and exchange with partner, use a ruler and state length of lines. Worksheets can also be given where students measure lines as well as draw lines.

Real life and measurement

8.    Students are asked to create a mini-book depicting scenarios where measurement is used in real life. For example:

–       measuring their height and the height of a friend and find difference

–       measuring the length of each side of the classroom and find the total length around the classroom

–       measure a part of the school in order to calculate the length of wire needed to fence of the area(construction)

 

Resources:  

·         Stationery: strips (30cm and 1m), rulers, metre sticks

·         Others: trundle wheel

 

Assessment:

·         Observation checklist

·         Worksheets

   

 

 

UNIT THREE: Uses of Land – Residential and Industrial

Learning Plan: 3 of   6

Class: Standard 2  Term: 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 3 hours

Topic:  Resources of our Land

Context:

The earth provides us with many resources, some of which are finite. Students are surrounded with minerals in varying forms; as such they need to know that these final products are acquired in raw states and there is a process which takes place to convert these mineral to useful materials.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:
Understanding Consequences

Effective Communication

 

Literacy

RReading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

☐ Literary Appreciation

R Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐ Problem Solving

☐ Critical thinking

☐ Communication

☐ Representation

☐ Reasoning

 

R ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         explain  the uses of some common minerals

·         discuss the importance of using minerals for sustainability of the economy

·         identify sources of minerals on a map

·         describe ways to conserve minerals and the environments they are extracted from

·         give reasons why persons should respect laws governing natural resources

·         organize descriptive paragraphs using a topic sentence and supporting details

·         apply vocabulary in context

·         create models to depict resources of Trinidad and Tobago.

 

Activities:

Uses of common minerals

1.    Students use Worksheet One to identify what they know about the items shown in the pictures and the materials used to make them. These items include pictures of asphalt paving, concrete blocks, iron pots, gold rings, and a silver spoon.

2.    In groups, students discuss the materials used to obtain the final product and infer where these materials came from. Each group will present a statement on where the materials came from to make each final product.

 

Identifying minerals

3.    Teacher guides discussion to identify minerals and source of obtaining minerals (see Sheet Information) Videos and pictures can be used to share information on minerals. E.g. videos showing mining of coal, limestone, etc.

4.    Students use a KWL Chart to track their knowledge as they find out more information about minerals. Teacher can ask questions such as: Where does cement come from? Where does asphalt for paving come from?

5.    In groups students make a list of all products/uses of each mineral. Students number items so as to see which group can list the most. Teacher highlights that minerals in their natural states may not be useful to us but when mined and refined are useful in many ways. (See info sheet especially in distinguishing between coal and charcoal)

 

Where are minerals found?

6.    Using an atlas, students locate where some minerals can be found in Trinidad and Tobago. They also can identify minerals that can be found in neighbouring CARICOM countries. E.g. Gold in Guyana. In an outline map of Trinidad and Tobago students identify the Pitch Lake and one other mineral deposit site – e.g. Limestone quarrying in the Northern Range

 

Preserving the Environment

1.    In groups students discuss the need for the preservation of the environment in extracting minerals. Students can be engaged in further discussion that will highlight the importance of respecting laws that govern land use: prevent exploitation of natural resources, etc.

2.    Each group presents one way in which the environment may be restored or saved from further destruction.

 

Expository Writing

3.    Students engage in expository writing.

Paragraph 1:  What is a mineral

Paragraph 2:  Types and what they are used to make

Paragraph 3:  Are these renewable or non-renewable resources? Ways to preserve the environment.

 

Vocabulary/Crossword Piece:

4.    Students engage in a solving a crossword with words associated with minerals.

 

Creating Models

5.    Students create models that represent or depict the resources of Trinidad and Tobago. These can include using foil for making rings, jewellery, copper wire and beads, creating a model of a community with road made out of play dough painted black etc.

 

Resources:

·         Stationery: worksheets, puzzles, KWL charts

·         Art Supplies: play dough, foil paper, colour pencils, copper wire, paper, black poster paint

·         ICTs: pictures, videos,

·         Literature: Information Sheet (for teacher)

·         Others: atlases, copies of outline maps of Trinidad and Tobago

 

Assessment:

•      Map work exercise

•      Observation

•      Oral questions

•      Participation rubric

•      Student checklists

•              Rubric for Writing

•              Rubric for Creative Writing Piece

   

 

 

Name: ______________________________                     How much do I know?

 

Item

Material used to make it

Where does the material come from?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Information about Minerals

Minerals are naturally occurring
They are not made by humans

Minerals are inorganic
They have never been alive and are not made up of plants or animals

Minerals are solids
They are not liquids (like water), or gases (like the air around you)

 

Cars

Cars – building a car
Many minerals are needed to make a car. Iron is used to make steel. It makes up the bulk of the car, and comes from minerals like magnetite and hematite.
Think about the properties of cars:

Strong

Rigid

Hard

 

Aeroplanes
Two metals, aluminium and titanium, are used a lot in aeroplanes because they are lightweight and strong. Aluminium comes from a material called bauxite. Titanium comes from minerals called rutile and ilmenite.
Titanium is also important in space flight, as it is used a lot in the manufacture of space shuttles.
Think about the properties of aluminium and titanium:

Strong

Lightweight

Rigid

 

Electronics
Gold is used in electronics. It conducts electricity very well and is very flexible, twisting easily into fine wires. It is used to make electronic circuit boards and other components.
Think about the properties of gold:

  • Conducts electricity
  • Does not rust
  • Is flexible – can be twisted into wires

Cement
As well as being an ingredient in bricks, clay minerals also make up much of the material used to stick them together – Portland cement.
Clay is mixed with limestone and other minerals, including one called gypsum that is added to help the cement harden.
Think about the properties of cement:

  • Easy to shape and sticky when wet
  • Quick to set (or harden)
  • Strong and rigid when set
  • Impermeable when set

Nuts, bolts, nails and screws
There are many minerals rich in iron. Iron is probably the most important metal used in building. When it is made into steel, it can act as a framework in large buildings and skyscrapers.
Bolts, nails and screws are often made of steel but are coated with another metal, such as zinc, to stop them rusting.
Think about the properties of nails and screws:

  • Strong
  • Rigid
  • Hard
  • Do not rust

 

Plumbing and Wiring
In the past, the pipes carrying water to your taps would have been made from lead. Lead comes from a mineral called galena, but because we now know lead is poisonous, copper and plastic pipes are used instead.
Copper is also used in electrical wiring, as it is an excellent conductor of electricity.
Think about the properties of copper:

  • Impermeable
  • Flexible
  • Stretchy (if you pull hard)
  • A good electrical conductor

 

 Limestone

 

Most limestone are marine deposits, but some are formed in lakes, rivers and on land. Limestone may form inorganically or by biochemical processes. There are many types of limestone because of the variety of conditions under which it is produced.

Limestone consist mainly of animal shells. The shells of many animals, those that live either in the sea or in freshwater, consist of calcium carbonate (calcite and aragonite). When the animals die, their shells are left on the ocean floor, lake bottom or river bed where they may accumulate into thick deposits.

 

 Gypsum

Rock gypsum is an evaporite rock that forms as shallow sea basins or salt lakes dry up enough for the mineral gypsum to come out of solution. But most gypsum occurs in massive chalky beds of rock gypsum. It’s mined for the manufacture of plaster, and household wallboard is filled with gypsum. Plaster of Paris is roasted gypsum with most of its associated water driven off, so it readily combines with water to return to gypsum.

 Gold

Gold nuggets account for very little of the world’s gold production. The gold ore being mined today shows no sign of its valuable fraction, yielding a few grams in every ton of rock. Large mines in Nevada, South Africa, Australia, Canada, and the former Soviet Union supply the world with gold for hundreds of industrial uses, bullion, dentistry, coinage, and jewellery. Gold is prized for its electrical conductivity, resistance to corrosion, and extreme malleability. Your computer has gold contacts in it.

Asphalt (also called bitumen)       Mixed with stone, sand and gravel to be used in paving.

             

The largest use of asphalt/bitumen is for making asphalt concrete for road surfaces . Pavement material is commonly composed of 5% asphalt/bitumen cement and 95% aggregates (stone, sand, and gravel). Due to its highly viscous nature, asphalt/bitumen cement must be heated so it can be mixed with the aggregates at the asphalt mixing plant.

                                                                                     Coal Mining                                                                        Charcoal in a BBQ                                                                           

Coal  vs  Charcoal

The difference between coal and charcoal is the fact that coal is a fossil fuel that is created due to the pressurizing of organic material over millions of years, while charcoal is made by the partial burning of wood. Coal is mined from the ground like other minerals, while charcoal is made in a kiln with limited oxygen supply. Both are non-renewable fuels and cause environmental pollution and degradation.

 

 

Information about Cement

 

What is cement?

Cement is usually grey.
Cement mixed with water, sand and gravel, forms concrete.
Cement mixed with water and sand, forms cement plaster.

An example of how cement can be made

1.) Limestone is taken from a quarry. It is the major ingredient needed for making cement. Smaller quantities of sand and clay are also needed. Limestone, sand and clay contain the four essential elements required to make cement. The four essential elements are calcium, silicon, aluminium and iron.

2.) Boulder-size limestone rocks are transported from the quarry to the cement plant and fed into a crusher which crushes the boulders into marble-size pieces

 

3.) The limestone pieces then go through a blender where they are added to the other raw materials in the right proportion.

 

4.) The raw materials are ground to a powder. This is sometimes done with rollers that crush the materials against a rotating platform.

 

5.) Everything then goes into a huge, extremely hot, rotating furnace to undergo a process called “sintering”. Sintering means: to cause to become a coherent mass by heating without melting. In other words, the raw materials become sort of partially molten. The raw materials reach about 2700° F (1480°C) inside the furnace. This causes chemical and physical changes to the raw materials and they come out of the furnace as large, glassy, red-hot cinders called “clinker”.

 

6.) The clinker is cooled and ground into a fine grey powder. A small amount of gypsum is also added during the final grinding. It is now the finished product – Portland cement.
The cement is then stored in silos (large holding tanks) where it awaits distribution.
The cement is usually shipped in bulk in purpose-made trucks, or even by barge or ship. Some is bagged for those who want small quantities.

 

 

 

Minerals –The main ingredient?

Across

  1. The early stages of a road
    5. Can be made into jewellery
  2. I was once a tree
  3. I can be used on walls and around someone’s broken hand

Down

  1. The main ingredient in cement
  2. In holes, deep in the ground you can find me
  3. If you have a spoon made of me you are very lucky
  4. You can walk on me, stand on me or put me on a wall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What I KNOW

What I WANT to Know

What I LEARNED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNIT THREE: Uses of Land: Residential and Industrial

Learning Plan: 4 of   5

Class: Standard 2  Term: 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 10 half-hour sessions

Topic:  Let Us Write!

Context:

Although writing as a means of communication has evolved to include emails and text messages, letter writing has maintained its importance. Students need to express themselves formally in writing for example in letters to a friend, parent or editor of a newspaper. This learning plan formally introduces letter writing and reviews skills in: composing sentences and paragraphs, tenses of verbs and the process approach to writing.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:
Effective Communication

Self-Management

 

Literacy

RReading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

R Literary Appreciation

R Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐ Problem Solving

☐ Critical thinking

☐ Communication

☐ Representation

☐ Reasoning

 

R ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         organize paragraphs using a topic sentence and supporting details

·         use transitional words and phrases to link sentences and paragraphs

·         recall vocabulary knowledge (including technical and content areas terms, antonyms, synonyms) when speaking, reading and writing

·         use tenses of verbs within context; patterns based on: am, is, are, has, have, do, does; simple present tense and simple past tense

·         write friendly letters using a process approach

·         address an envelope for mailing.

 

Activities:

Topic sentence and supporting details

1.    Students are presented with several forms of audio, visual and audio-visual stimuli. Stimuli can include: fliers, posters and pictures, radio and television advertisements or short video clips used in previous learning plans or new ones from the internet.

2.    Discussions based on stimuli should elicit ideas on the main point of the piece (main idea) as well as evidence for the suggestion from what is seen or heard (supporting details).

3.    Ideas are written, firstly briefly (simple graphic organisers etc.) and then developed into sentences and paragraphs.

 

Transitional words and phrases for sentences and paragraphs

4.    Students must be provided with an inventory of words and phrases that they can use to connect their ideas when writing. Words and phrases would depend mostly on the level/age of writers and to some degree the type of writing and topic. See resources section for a suggested list.

5.    Students need to practice how to use transitional words and phrases in their writing.

 

Vocabulary inventory

6.    Students are led in a review vocabulary exercise involving antonyms, synonyms and the applicable technical and content-specific terms that they would have encountered.

7.    Oral exercises and quizzes followed by written exercises are done. Students must be expected to use vocabulary in content both on the oral and written exercises rather than providing definitions for them.

 

Review of the process approach – This can be done by the students.

8.    Students would have written pieces using the process approach. Students lead in a review of the approach and perhaps, reasons for it being useful in writing.

9.    Pieces of work that students have done are used as examples of products using the process approach. Students review the steps and the advantage of each step as they progress through a writing activity.

 

Letter writing – why and how

10. Students are presented with several examples of simple letters – letter to the editor/Santa/friend/parent etc. In groups, students read letters, discuss and jot-down ideas on what they read: main idea/topic sentences and supporting details, how the letter is arranged, salutations, punctuation, indent for paragraphs

11. Parts of letters can be cut out and separated for discussions. Topic sentences and supporting details are included in discussions. An interactive online game can be used for exploring letters also (see resources section).

12. Students use a photocopied letter template to learn about the format (see resource section). Teacher demonstrates using parts of the letters from Step 12 on the template; students do several examples.

Putting it together and practicing it

13.  Students write letters using the template until they are comfortable to write in the format without a guide. There should be several opportunities for practice using a range of topics including:

ü  Letter to Santa/mommy/daddy/other requesting a special gift for Christmas – am, is, are, has, have, some past tense, [modals – will, would]

ü  Letter to a cousin/friend/other telling them about their field trip or other school experience (previous learning activity) – Past tense focus, am, is, are, has, have

ü  Letter to the Member of Parliament/garbage man/neighbour about garbage in the area – am, is, are, has, have, Present tense

 

Addressing an envelope

14. Students can bring an envelope from mail sent to their home (light bill, water bill etc.) as examples; teacher can provide additional examples and allow students to manipulate. Discussions focus on: information on envelope, purpose of information, location and purpose of stamp. Extension: students may be taught about addressing an envelope to send to someone in another country.

15. Publishing ideas: letters are prepared to be mailed.

 

Resources:

·         Stationery: envelopes and stamps, TT Post envelopes for posting letters, different stamps used in Trinidad and Tobago

·         Art supplies: needed if teacher decides to have students decorate letters

·         ICTs: search key words ‘interactive letter writing game’, ‘writing letters for 8 year olds’ etc.

·         Literature: Katherine S. McKnight, The Teachers’ Big Book of Graphic Organizers. Jossey-Bass Teacher, CA. 2010. Web.

·         Others: pictures applicable for LEA activities, posters, pictures of everyday signs, letter template

Assessment:

·         Journal writing and oral presentations where teacher feels they can be useful.

·         Students are to write a letter, address an envelope and mail their letters.

·         Teacher decides on how the review activities will be assessed.

   

 

 

PRE-WRITING GRAPHIC ORGANISER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          

 

 




NAME: ______________________________   DATE: _______________ TOPIC: _______________________________

BEGINNING TO WRITE- Pre-writing

MAIN IDEA or TOPIC SENTENCE AND SUPPORTING DETAILS

The main idea is usually found as the topic sentence in a paragraph. It usually the first sentence of the paragraph. The topic sentence tells us what the paragraph will be about.

The supporting details are written after the topic sentence. These sentences tell us more about the topic sentence. The supporting details explain and give details about what we are writing about. They must talk about the same topic as the topic sentence. Supporting details are important and every topic sentence must have some supporting details.

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                      

 

 

 

 

 

 



Teachers would need to research other transitional words and phrases for teaching students how to write better. It is important to consistently SHOW students how to use them and provide various opportunities for them to use/apply them in writing tasks.

Suggested transitional words and phrases:

To introduce paragraphs:

  1. Firstly, secondly, finally – if points are part of a list
  2. Additionally, furthermore, another reason – if points lead into each other and if they are part of a list

To connect sentences:

  1. Use of coordinating conjunction – and
  2. Because of ….(because can begin a sentence but the sentence must not provide the reasons for something in the previous sentence.)
  3. Students must be taught that every sentence must add to the topic without repeating ideas; ideas must be built upon to make the writing interesting.

 

 

The Process Approach to writing

Some research may be needed to sufficiently explore the writing process with students.

Steps/Stages – Refer to Writing strand for Standard Two

  1. Prewriting – please note that ‘brainstorming’ is one activity under the pre-writing stage of the process approach.
  2. Drafting – a first attempt at writing using the ideas from the pre-writing stage.
  3. Revising – looking at the draft with the intention to make changes to improve the piece.
  4. Editing – making changes to the piece.
  5. Publishing – presenting a final piece for others to read.

 

 

 

LETTER WRITING TEMPLATE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   UNIT THREE: Uses of Land: Residential and Industrial

Learning Plan: 5 of 5

Class: Standard 1  Term: 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 3-4 days

Topic:  Know Your Country

Context:

As citizens, we should develop love, honour, respect and care for our nation. Getting to know their country better is one way to allow young students to develop these qualities and positive attitudes towards their homeland.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:

Critical Thinking

Choose an item.

 

Literacy

RReading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

☐ Literary Appreciation

☐ Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐ Problem Solving

☐ Critical thinking

☐ Communication

☐ Representation

☐ Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         state four types of land use

·         represent each use of land using a colour code on an outline map of Trinidad and Tobago 

·         organize paragraphs using a topic sentence and supporting details

·         use transitional words and phrases to link sentences and paragraphs

·         recognize signs written in Spanish

·         appreciate that Spanish language is important to contemporary Trinidad and Tobago

·         use guided reading comprehension strategies and skills previously taught to answer literal and inferential type question

·         use simple past tense of verbs within context

·         relate the terms ‘property’ and ‘sustainability’ to land and its uses

·         describe 2-3 ways in which respect for the environment can be displayed.

 

Activities:

Cross-country Tour

1.    A cross-country tour can be organised to give students an opportunity to consolidate all learning gained in this and the previous learning units.

2.    While on tour, they identify and chat about agricultural areas, recreational areas, protected lands and industries (e.g. cement, asphalt, petroleum) and physical features, including residential areas and signs written in Spanish*. Students are engaged in completing a checklist/journey log which reflects their observations while on tour.

3.    Through guided questioning, reference to checklists and chats, teacher ensures that students make connections between what they observe and what was taught; if possible, students take pictures of places visited.

4.    Teacher uses journey logs and pictures taken while on tour to stimulate further discussion in the classroom.

 

*The importance of Spanish to Contemporary Trinidad and Tobago

5.    Teacher guides further discussion of signs in Spanish and questions students as to why they think Spanish is used.

 

a)    Spanish-speaking people reside in Trinidad and Tobago.

b)    Many Spanish-speaking people visit our country.

c)    Spanish is second most spoken language in the world. (U.S Central Intelligence Agency World Factbook)

d)    Trinidad and Tobago is located at the gateway to Spanish-speaking countries of Central and South America.

 

Recapping Land Usage – Writing/Reading Comprehension

6.    Students are placed in groups and engage in reading a teacher-made passage (see sample below) with questions on land use in Trinidad and Tobago. In their groups, they discuss the material and provide answers to the questions at the literal and inferential levels using guided reading comprehension strategies and skills previously taught. (Alternatively, students can write a descriptive piece in the past tense detailing their observations of land use in Trinidad and Tobago.)

 

Mapping Land Usage

7.    Guided by the teacher, students use atlases to view and interpret maps which represent land use. Using four outline maps of Trinidad and Tobago, students colour-in areas to show the four major uses of land. Students include title, key, border and compass on their maps.

 

Interview on Land Use in their Country

8.    Students interview people at home and in their community to get answers to 3 questions:

–       How do you feel about the use of land in your community and in your country?

–       How do you think unused land can be put to good use?

–       In what ways can citizens show respect for the environment?

9.    Students’ discuss their findings with the class. They then engage in journal writing to make broad statements about the findings.

E.g. Most people feel that the land in their community is being underused. They feel that it could be used for…..

Some ways to show respect for the environment are…

 

Imaginative Writing Activity

10. Students apply their understanding of good land usage by writing an imaginative piece which begins ‘If I owned an island, here is how I would put my land to good use.

 

Property and Sustainability

11. Students are asked to make a list of things that belong to them. They share and compare answers with their peers. Teacher elicits from students (or introduces) the term ‘property’ and its definition. Class discussion allows students to relate the term ‘property’ to land and its uses.

12. Through guided discussion, students link land use to sustainability e.g. Land is used for agriculture and this provides food for us and money for farmers.

 

Class Quiz – ‘Know Your Country’

13. Teacher informs students of an upcoming class quiz. Students get into groups of 4-6. Each group devises 5 or more questions based on land use in Trinidad and Tobago.

14. Teacher compiles and adds to quiz questions.

15. Class is divided into 4 groups. Teacher assumes the role of quiz host. Groups 1 and 2 participate in Round 1 of the quiz. The winner then challenges Group 3 in Round 2. The winner of Round 2 then challenges Group 4. Teacher awards prizes/certificates for first, second, third and fourth place winners.

                                              

Resources:  

·         Stationery: notebooks, pencils, journals

·         Art Supplies: colour pencils

·         ICTs: cameras, pictures, computer, projector

·         Literature: reading comprehension passage with questions, quiz question cards

·         Others: atlases, copies of outline maps of Trinidad and Tobago

 

Assessment:

•           Know Your Country Quiz

•           Learning logs

•           Map work exercise

•           Observation

•           Oral questions

•           Participation rubric

•           Reading Comprehension worksheet

•           Rubric for Imaginative Writing

•           Student checklists

 

 

   

 

Sample Comprehension passage

Land is a very precious resource. It provides us with almost all that we need to survive such as food, water, materials for making clothing and building shelters, and minerals. As such, all citizens are responsible for protecting and respecting the land in their country.

The land in Trinidad and Tobago is used in many different ways according to the needs of our country. Quite a lot of land is used for building houses and businesses, and for making roads. Some land is used for growing crops and rearing animals while some of it is used as playing and sporting areas. Some land is also used for industrial purposes and the quarrying of minerals such as asphalt and limestone. Other parts such as swamps and forests are known as protected areas because it is against the law to destroy the plants and animals that live there. Examples of these include the Caroni Swamp and the Nariva Swamp.

There is still a lot of unused land in Trinidad and Tobago. Can you think of some ways in which it can be put to good use?

Land Unit 2 

LEARNING UNIT:  Uses of Land: Agriculture, Recreation and Protected Lands

 

Class:  Standard Two Theme:   My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Estimated frame:  3 weeks

 

Context:

 

Land is one of the most precious resources on earth – so precious that many laws have been created to protect it. Land uses include agriculture, recreation and reserves. Man’s needs often influence the way in which land is used; however, making the decision to use land in a particular way affects both man and our environment. Promoting an awareness of land use in students will not only allow them to appreciate how it is being used but will also influence their decision making as to how it is used in the future.

  

Outcomes:

 

At the end of these learning experiences students will:

·         understand that land use is influenced by individuals’ needs as well as by the law

·         justify land use in a localized area

·         solve problems involving measures

·         demonstrate a basic understanding of the terms: property, sustainability and respect for the environment

·        demonstrate a basic understanding of responsibility

·         give reasons why persons should respect laws governing property rights, access to public spaces and community resources

·         grow plants using good environmental practices

·         demonstrate teamwork and safe working habits to grow plants

·         display responsibility in caring for plants

·         enjoy growing plants

·         recognise that citizens have a responsibility to become self-sufficient    

·         sing folk, traditional and nation building songs independently and in groups

·         understand the concept of size, space, form and colour through construction activities

·         demonstrate that plants need light and water for growth

·         associate each class of vertebrates with at least two distinguishing characteristics

·         discuss the message of aural texts by asking and answering “5Ws+H” questions

·         use punctuation in sentences: full stop, question mark, exclamation mark, apostrophe in contractions and possessives

·         use the simile in writing 

·         organize paragraphs using a topic sentence and supporting details

·         use transitional words and phrases to link sentences and paragraphs

·         identify audio works as media texts

·         critically view and listen to a variety of media materials with a focus on simple audio works

·         interpret content in print, visual, audio and electronic media

·         explain the purpose of selected media texts

·         write using creative descriptions appealing to the five senses

·         apply vocabulary in context – homophones.

 

Learning Plans:

 

1.    Land use

2.    Becoming responsible citizens

3.    Vertebrates in our environment

4.    Growing our own plants

5.    Investigating plant growth

 

Resources:

 

Learning Plan 1: video showing various ways land is used, audio materials (from school broadcasting unit), CD player, computers, cameras, projector/DVD player and television set, video/slide show based on land use in Trinidad and Tobago, song copies, pictures showing various ways land is used, materials for making a picture book, pencils, notebooks.

Learning Plan 2: selected media texts (print, visual, audio and electronic), computers, internet, projector, television set, notebooks, pencils, recording system, art materials/placards for walk-a-thon.

Learning Plan 3: PowerPoint of animals, graphic organisers, chart paper, markers, pictures of animal x-rays, pictures of animals, coloured paper, small cardboard box, art materials.

Learning Plan 4: plants, virtual field trip on how to plant (http://www.agriculture.gov.tt/hints-and-tips.html), garden tools available in school, pictures of tools from second year unit, song copies – “The Green Grass Grew All Around”, pot, soil, tool, paint, coloured pencils, drawing paper, puzzle, journal for planting activities, paper to create portfolio/folder, a plot of land or (soil and containers to plant), seeds, seedlings, computers, internet access, measuring tapes, water, watering can, soil nutrients, Styrofoam cups, sunlight, recording sheets, gloves.

Learning Plan 5: seeds, medium sized cardboard box (for plants which get no sunlight), brown paper bags, cups, tablespoons, seedlings, journals logs, blank sheets of paper.

     

Assessments:

 

·         Checklist/Anecdotal notes for interpreting visual media

·         Checklist/rubric for Picture Book   

·         Checklists: participation in debate, information recorded, observation, group collaboration, oral presentation – Show and Tell, placard-making

·         Flow Chart worksheet

·         Teacher’s observation

·         Oral/Written questions

·         Rubrics: for students’ research, oral presentation, singing, diorama, expository writing, journal writing

·         Student portfolio

 

 

UNIT TWO: Uses of Land – Agriculture, Recreation and Protected Lands

Learning Plan: 1 of   5

Class: Standard 2  Term 1 

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land     

Duration: 2 days

Topic:  Land Use

Context:

Land use describes the various ways in which human beings make use of and manage land. It is important for students to be aware of how the land in their country is used and to understand that this is influenced by the needs of the country and its citizens.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE:

Creative Thinking

    

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience, students will:

·         identify audio works as media texts

·         interpret content in print, visual, audio and electronic media

·         discuss the message of aural texts by asking and answering ‘5Ws+H-’ questions

·         describe orally and through song the basic needs of every human being–food, water, shelter, clothing

·         state four types of land use

·         discuss the types of land use: housing, agriculture recreation, industry

·         give reasons why land is used for housing, agriculture, recreation and industry

·         analyse in one paragraph the choice of selection for using      land for housing, agriculture, recreation or industry

·         write two paragraphs using creative descriptions appealing to the five senses.

 

Activities:

Let’s Listen and Learn

1.    Teacher reviews different types of media texts and engages students in discussion on the usefulness of audio texts. Teacher sets up a purpose for listening to particular audio text pertaining to land use in the environment. (Pre-recorded materials from School Broadcasting Unit may be used). This is done in the form of oral/written 5Ws+1H questions.

2.    Students listen critically to the audio text which is then discussed using the guiding questions based on land use.

 

Community Field Trip 

3.    Teacher sets up a purpose for a community fieldtrip. Students are taken on a community field trip and observe the various ways land is used. Students can take pictures of same (to use in their picture/word book in step 7 below).

4.    Students talk about what they observed on the field trip and what was most interesting to them.

5.    Teacher engages students in a discussion on why the land in their community is being used in the ways observed and elicits reasons that justify same (e.g. some land is being used for a play park; this is very good because children need a nice place to play together and relax).

6.    Students orally identify basic needs (food, water, clothing and shelter). They learn and sing a song on “Basic Needs” and teacher helps them to relate the song to land use.

 

Viewing Video On Land Use

7.    Students view video/slide show of land in different parts of the country being used for housing, agriculture, recreation and industry.

8.    Students discuss the types of land use and reasons for same as seen in the video.

9.    Students make comparisons between the video material and the field trip based on the land use seen in both.

 

Creation of Picture /Word Book on Land Use

10. Students use pictures to create picture book depicting the various ways in which land is used in their country.

11. Students write short descriptive paragraphs based on the land use depicted in the pictures.

*Teacher can guide students to do this activity using computers (Microsoft Word/PowerPoint), if available, which can be presented to the class.

 

Group Writing Activity

12. Students are placed in groups. Guided by the teacher, they write a piece on land use in their country giving reasons and justification. These are added to students’ portfolios.

 

Resources:

·         ICTs: video showing various ways land is used, audio materials (from school broadcasting unit), CD player, computers, cameras, projector/DVD player and television set, video/slide show based on land use in Trinidad and Tobago

·         Literature: song copies, pictures showing various ways land is used

·         Stationery: materials for making a picture book, pencils, notebooks

 

Assessment:

·         Oral/Written Questions

·         Observation/Participation checklist

·         Checklist/rubric for picture book  

·         Expository Writing Rubric  

·         Student Portfolio

 

   

 

 

Sample 5Ws + 1H Questions

  • What is the topic of the audio material?
  • Who created this audio text?
  • Where will you find the place being spoken about?
  • How is the land being used based on what you heard?
  • Why do you think the land being used for this purpose?

 

Song about basic needs (To the tune of ‘Mary had a little lamb’)

Everyone needs food to eat

It keeps us all alive

Everyone needs water to live

If we are to survive

Everyone needs clothes to wear

Our bodies to protect          

Every one of us needs a home

To keep us safe and warm

UNIT TWO: Uses of Land: Agriculture, Recreational and Protected Lands

Learning Plan: 2 of   5

Class: Standard 2   Term 1

 

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 2 1/2 days

Topic:  Becoming Responsible Citizens

Context:

The land provides us with all the physical resources that we need to survive. It is, therefore, the responsibility of every citizen to learn how to respect and protect the environment. There is no better place to start learning about this kind of care and respect than with young, impressionable students who are responsible for the future.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE:
Understanding Consequences

Self-Management

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience, students will:

·         explain the purpose of selected media texts

·         interpret content in print, visual, audio and electronic media

·         describe ways in which respect for the environment can be displayed

·         cite benefits of respect for environmental laws

·        keep area and personal things/self- clean and tidy

·         organize descriptive paragraphs using a topic sentence, supporting details and transitional words and phrases

·         use full stop, question mark, exclamation mark, apostrophe in contractions, possessives correctly in writing

·         use simile in writing

·         create and perform a song/jingle related to respect and care of the environment in groups in correct tempo (speed) and with a pleasing tone.

 

Activities:

 

The Purpose of Media Texts

1.    Students view/listen to selected media texts (television show, advertisement, radio broadcast, poem or any other audio selections)

2.    Teacher engages students in a discussion to explain the purpose of each.

3.    Students make simple sentences to explain the purpose of each form of media text.

Personal Action Planning

1.    Students brainstorm ideas for creating a personal checklist in which they outline how they can care for themselves and their personal space.

 

Research Project

2.    Students engage in a group research project using various media texts to:

-cite laws in Trinidad and Tobago regarding respect for and care of the environment and the benefits of these laws (Environmental Management Authority offices/personnel/ websites)

-source one example of an advertisement on respecting and protecting the environment

-describe ways in which people, especially children their age, can contribute to caring and showing respect for their environment.

-Each group makes oral presentations to the class.

 

Independent Writing Activity

3.    Students use the writing process to write descriptive paragraphs based on the topic. Students are guided in the use of topic sentences, supporting details and transitional words and phrases, full stop, question mark, exclamation mark, apostrophe in contractions and possessives in writing.

 

Debate

4.    Teacher describes the procedure involved in a simple debate. Students are placed in two large groups. They are guided by the teacher to prepare for a debate on a topic related to respect and care for the environment (e.g. “We should be responsible for cleaning the garbage in and around our classroom/home whether or not we have littered.”

5.    Students engage in a class debate with the teacher as moderator. Teacher ensures that all students get an opportunity to participate.

 

Composing a Jingle

6.    In groups, students are guided to create a jingle based on care and respect for the environment using simile and details that appeal to the senses.

7.    Teacher guides students as they practice their jingle to develop correct tempo and pleasing tone. They perform their jingles to the class/school.

8.    Jingles are recorded and added to students’ portfolios. (These jingles can be sung if they go on the walk-a-thon suggested below.)

 

Follow-up Activity

9.    A school-based walk-a-thon can be organized with a theme that creates community awareness of the benefits of care and respect for the environment. Students can create their own placards.

 

Resources:

·         ICTs: selected media texts (print, visual, audio and electronic), computers, internet, projector, television set, recording system

·         Stationery: notebooks, pencils

·         Others: placards for walk-a-thon

                                                             

Assessment:

·         Checklist for participation in debate

·         Checklist for placard-making

·         Group Research rubric

·         Oral presentation rubric

·         Project/Portfolio Assessment

·         Singing rubric

 

   

 

UNIT TWO: Uses of Land: Agriculture, Recreation and Protected Land       

Learning Plan: 3 of   5

Class: Standard 2    Term 1

Theme: My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land     

Duration: 1 ½ days

Topic:  Vertebrates in our Environment

Context:

There is a variety of fauna existing in Trinidad and Tobago, many of which are vertebrates. Having knowledge of vertebrates will enable students to classify animals as vertebrates and invertebrates and to develop an appreciation for their existence on land.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE:
Critical Thinking

Choose an item.

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☐Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         associate common animals with the five groups of vertebrates based on the based on the identification of their distinguishing characteristics (mammals, birds, reptiles, fish and amphibians)

·         interpret content in visual media

·         organize descriptive paragraphs using a topic sentence and supporting details

·         work in small groups using different materials and colours to create a diorama depicting vertebrates in the protected lands of Trinidad and Tobago.

 

Activities:

 

Viewing Pictures of Animals

1.    Students chat with peers about animals with which they are familiar. As students share with the class the teacher writes the names of the animals on a chart.

2.    Students view a PowerPoint presentation of some animals found in the protected lands of Trinidad and Tobago. (If this is not possible, printed pictures can be shown of animals found in the protected lands of Trinidad and Tobago.)

3.    In groups students compile a list of other animals seen in the PowerPoint.

 

Classifying Vertebrates

4.    With guidance from the teacher, students examine pictures of x-rays of various animals (samples provided below) finding commonality (a backbone). Students identify the backbone.

5.    Teacher guides discussion on the purpose of a backbone (support of the structure/allows flexibility in movement) and reviews definition for vertebrate.

6.    A review is also done of vertebrates and invertebrates -using the list of vertebrates compiled and a graphic organiser, students categorize the animals, into two groups – those with backbones and those without.

7.    Students use pictures of animals to form common groups. Students are guided into forming five classes(birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles and fishes)

8.    Teacher elicits commonalities among animals in each group, highlighting characteristics of each group. E.g. Birds – are covered in feathers, have two feet, have beaks/bills, lay eggs, most can fly.

9.    Students further classify their vertebrates into their five classes (mammals, birds, reptiles, fish and amphibians) checking against compiled list of characteristics.

Ducks, parrots, hawks, eagles are birds because they are covered with feathers, have two feet, lay eggs and have beaks/bills.

 

Mini-book/Photo story

 

10. Guided by the teacher, students create a mini-book or photo story using the vertebrates from the list compiled above. Students write about each class of vertebrates, stick pictures or draw pictures of animals in each class.

,

Creating a Diorama

11. In groups, students create a diorama of vertebrates that inhabit the protected lands of Trinidad and Tobago.

12. These are set up in a display corner and school is invited to view. Students provide explanations to visitors.

 

Resources:

·         Art materials

·         ICTs: PowerPoint/pictures of animals

·         Stationery: chart paper, markers, coloured paper

·         Others: graphic organisers, pictures of animal x-rays, pictures of animals, small cardboard box

 

Assessment:

·         Checklist/Anecdotal notes for interpreting visual media

·         Observation

·         Rubric for diorama

·         Student participation checklist  

   

Example of the pages of mini book.

 

Birds

·      are covered in feathers

·      have two feet

·      have beaks or bills

·      lay eggs,

·     most can fly

           duck

 

  toucan

 

 parrot

 

 flamingos

 

 

 

 

 


    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Animals for Grouping Vertebrates

Photos by Clayton Manick

                          

 Toucan                                                                                               tortoise

               

 otter                                                                          Scarlet Ibis

                     

Flamingos                                                                                 Ocelot            

red howler monkey                         macaw                                                 

                                        

Parrot                                                                   duck

                             

Fish                                                                                       

                                                                                                                                                                                                         snake                   

         

Lizard                                                                                                    horse

                               

Wild hog                                                                                              lion

 

             

Caiman                                                                                 capybara

                             Toad

                      

                                                                                Frog

      X-ray Pictures of Animals                            Can you tell which animal it is?

                     

 

                             

                                         

UNIT TWO: Uses of Land: Agriculture, Recreation and Protected Land

Learning Plan: 4 of  5

Class: Standard 2 Term 1  

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land     

Duration: 3 days

Topic:  Growing Our Own Plants

Context:

Most foods are obtained through the cultivation of plants. In an effort to promote self-sufficiency, there is a significant need to educate our children about agriculture and growing plants as an important part of our livelihood.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE:
Cooperation

Self-Motivation

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☒Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☒Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☒Communication

☒Representation

☐Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         discuss 2-3 ways in which persons can become self-sufficient

·         describe at least one good environmental practice when growing plants

·         collaborate to grow plants

·         determine lengths using non-standard and standard units

·         demonstrate the use of safety practices when growing plants

·         demonstrate responsibility in caring for plants

·         sequence the main steps from land preparation to growing a plant

·         demonstrate enjoyment as they grow plants

·         organize descriptive paragraphs using a topic sentence and supporting details

·         use transitional words and phrases to link sentences and paragraphs

·         use context to arrive at word meanings for homophones and multiple meaning words.

Activities:

Show and Tell

1.    Students are encouraged to talk about what they know about plants, including their favourite plants. Students are asked to bring their favourite plant (or a photo of their favourite plant) to class for show and tell session. Each student will tell his/her class about the plant and why he/she likes it. Students may draw and paint or colour a plant and flower pot in bright colours and designs to represent their plants.

Independent Writing

2.    Each student writes at least one descriptive paragraph about his/her plant.

 

Useful Plants

3.    Students discuss in groups plants that they can identify as useful. Alternatively, students can use ICT to research different types of plants and their uses to man (foods, furniture, medicine, and beautification).

Self Sufficiency

4.    Students are guided into a discussion on how persons can become self-sufficient by growing their own plants.

Getting Ready to Plant

5.    Students review what plants need to grow from previous learning plan.

6.    Students complete puzzle about growing plants

7.    Students are taken on a real or virtual field trip to a farmer’s garden to observe how plants are grown. Alternatively, students use the internet/reading material/prior knowledge of students/parents to get information on how to grow plants.

a.    Suggested website: http://www.agriculture.gov.tt/hints-and-tips.html

8.    Students review tools used for planting. (see resources from Second Year learning plan “Tools used in Agriculture”). Each student chooses his/her favourite tool and creates a drawing of it. (This can give an idea of what students enjoy doing e.g. digging, watering, cutting, weeding etc.)

Let’s Sing

9.    Copies of song ‘The Green Grass Grew All Around’ are distributed to students. (Lyrics can be found using the search words “Lyrics Green Grass Grew All Around”. The lyrics may be adapted to suit this activity.) Students read the words of the song and listen to the melody a few times. They sing along until they learn the words and melody.

Planting Activity

10. Teacher demonstrates planting activities- [digging holes, fertilizing, planting seeds/seedlings, moulding, watering).

11. Students are grouped and each group is given a space/pot, soil and tools. Students engage in solving problems involving length of the space between plants to be planted in a row using arbitrary measures such as hand span, foot span and straws. Students also use standard measures such as centimetre and metres to verify. Each group is responsible for preparing the soil and planting plants (that the group has selected from the teacher’s list of plants). As they plant, they sing the song learned above.

12. Students clean and put away tools after use.

 

Flow Chart

13. Students review the steps they used in planting. They then sequence the planting process using diagrams/drawing on a flow chart.

Pictorial Journal

14. Students keep a daily journal (if possible using pictures taken) of their activities which are added to their portfolio.

Word Meaning

15. Students find meanings of multiple meaning words met within the activities above (e.g. plant [shrub, factory], soil [dirty, dirty], can [tin, able to], weed [unwanted plant, clear land], rose [plant or flower, past tense of rise], etc.).

16. Student are guided to recognise homophones stemming out of the activities above and to use them correctly in context (e.g. hole-whole, ant-aunt, dew-due, bear-bare, pear-peer etc.).

 

Celebrating our Plants

17. A garden show is organized (video tape, picture books, show and tell, sale of products etc.).These are added to students’ portfolios.

18. Students can conduct a sale with the products from their plants as a follow-up activity.

 

Resources:

·         Stationery: paper to create portfolio / folder

·         ICTs: virtual field trip on how to plant

http://www.agriculture.gov.tt/hints-and-tips.html , computers, internet access

·         Art supplies: paint, coloured pencils, drawing paper

·         Literature: puzzle, journal for planting activities, pictures of tools from Infant 2 Unit

·         Others: plants, pot, soil, garden tools available at school, song copies of “The green grass grew around”, measuring tapes, a plot of land or (soil and containers to plant), seeds, seedlings

water, watering can, soil nutrients, styrotex cups (experiment), sunlight, recording sheets

o   Seedlings: sunflower, tomato, lettuce, peas, beans, garden flowers, garden flowers, etc.

o   Garden tools– hand forks and spades, gloves

 

Assessment:

·         Checklist for information recorded

·         Checklist for oral presentation – Show and Tell

·         Flow Chart Worksheet

·         Observations

·         Oral Questions

·         Rubric for Journal Writing

·      Student Portfolio

·         Writing rubric

 

   

 

 

 

GROWING PLANTS (Puzzle)
Unscramble each of the clue words.
Take the letters that appear in boxes and unscramble them for the final message.





 

UNIT TWO: Uses of Land: Agriculture, Recreation and Protected Lands

Learning Plan: 5 of   5

Class: Standard 2    Term 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land     

Duration: 1 week (alternatingly)

Topic:  Investigating Plant Growth

Context:

Students would have noticed that plants thrive in certain conditions but weaken in others. In this learning plan, they are provided with the opportunity to investigate the response of plants to two environmental conditions – light and water. Through carefully planned and well executed experiments, students will develop important inquiry skills as: making observations, recording data, making inferences and drawing conclusions.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

HFLE:

Cooperation

Effective Communication

 

Literacy

☒Reading

☒Writing

☒Oral Communication

☐Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐Problem Solving

☐Critical thinking

☐Communication

☒Representation

☒Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

Differentiated Instruction

 

Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         predict what is likely to occur if plants are deprived of water or light

·         conduct experiments to demonstrate that plants need light and water to grow

·         represent findings in appropriate graphic organizers which are easy to extract information from and are labelled appropriately

·         use punctuation in sentences: full stop, question mark, exclamation mark, apostrophe in contractions and possessives

·         follow and provide relatively complex directions and instructions in writing

·         use appropriate verbal and non-verbal language features to communicate effectively

·         write using creative descriptions appealing to the five senses.

 

Activities:

 

Pre-Activity

(Seeds will have to be germinated a week in advance).

1.    Germinating seeds (a quick review of the process of germination is done here or if possible seedling can be bought).

 

Experimenting with Growing Seedlings (Light and Water)

2.    Teacher guides discussion on what plants need to survive and what would happen if plants are deprived of water or light. Alternatively pictures can be shown to students where farmers are watering or fertilizing plants and students can be questioned about the importance of these practices in caring for plants. Seedlings will be used to investigate whether plants need light and water for healthy growth.

3.    Setting up Experiment

a.    Teacher goes through the steps in conducting an experiment. Each group will complete the sections for each experiment and each member will have a copy. (See experiment method attached)

b.    Experimenting with light: One plant (A) is placed in direct sunlight or at a window; the other (B), where light can be inhibited (in a cupboard or cardboard box). Both plants are watered each day with two tablespoons of water. Observations are made daily and recorded in the journal. Students make drawings of what the plants look like on the worksheet every two days and compare them. (Specific attention should be paid to use of colour, height, number of leaves, thickness of lines in drawings)

c.    Experimenting with water: Another pair of plants is placed at a window where only one (A) is watered with two tablespoons of water each day. The other (B) is not watered. The process is recorded using the method used above. The experiment is conducted and within a few days a conclusion is drawn.

 

Creating a Reflective Journal

4.    Students record the process in a journal. Students will create a cover page for their journal. If possible, the entire journal or cover can be done by students using any word processing program. This journal would be used for recording information, making inferences, answering questions and reflecting on experiences during the experiment. All writing and drawing pieces will be placed in this journal: drawings (life size pictures of plants, measurement of growth, reflections, experiment write-up, etc. Each student will have one journal. Cover page may show student’s perceptions of what is a plant, what plants may need and what happens as plants grow.

 

Resources:

·         Stationery:  journal logs, blank sheets of paper

·         Others:  seeds or seedlings, medium sized cardboard box or brown paper bags, cups, tablespoons

 

Assessment:

·         Group collaboration checklist

·         Observation checklist

·         Rubric for journal

 

   

 

Name :______________________________   Date: __________________

 

Do plants need _______________________ ?

 

 Draw plant after each observation interval.                                                      Describe the plants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                         Plant A                                                                    Plant B

 

Steps to Follow

Teacher poses the questions to students:

  1. Why do we have to water our plants?
  2. What will happen if you don’t water your plant for one day?
  3. What will happen if you don’t water your plant for many days?

This investigation will help answer the questions above. Allow students to practice conducting an experiment by using the attached format for guidance. In groups, students will be responsible for two plants – Plant A and Plant B. Students draw pictures pre and post investigation.  Both plants are placed in a location where sunlight is available.

Plant A is watered when the soil is dry on the top. Plant B is not watered. Students will observe the plants and record what they see. When a conclusion can be drawn, students complete the last page of their observation booklet. (Journal)

 

This process can be done simultaneously depending on the level of the students to investigate – Do plants need light?

Two plants are again used in the same process but one is placed in an area where no light can enter (cardboard box or cupboard). Alternatively a dark/brown paper bag can be placed over one of the plant to inhibit sunlight.

 

Some information about plants

Plants need light, water and nutrient rich soil to grow and stay healthy. When seeds are planted they do not need light to germinate. Seeds contain a plant embryo and stored food to give the baby plant all the energy it needs to sprout. After the seeds sprout the plants do need light to grow. Light is needed for the plants to produce their own food through photosynthesis. Shortly after sprouting, the plant grown in the dark will grow just as the ones in the light and partial light because they all have stored energy from their seeds, but the plant grown in the dark will not have any colour. The partial light plant will have a faint yellow-green colour, and the plant grown in the light will have the healthy green colour of a plant capable of photosynthesis. Over time the plant growing in the light will continue to use the light to produce its own food and it will grow, but the plants grown without full light will die since they cannot produce food without light.

 

Subject: Science                 Level: Standard Two                       Date:

 

Strand: Systems and Interactions

 

Group Members:

 

 

 

Aim: To investigate the effect on a seedling of

  1. daily watering or no watering
  2. exposure to sunlight or receives no light

 

Apparatus: What did you use in your experiment?

 

 

Method (i) : Steps taken to conduct the experiment involving watering of plant.

A flow chart can be created which show the activities done step by step as follows:

  • What was done to each plant?
  • How often were the plants watered?
  • How much water was given?
  • When next was the plant watered?
  • What was done to both plants?
  • For how many days was the plant watered?

 

Method (ii) : Steps taken to conduct the experiment involving placing of plant

A flow chart can be created which show the activities done step by step as follows:

  • What was done to each plant?
  • How often were the plants watered?
  • How many days was the plant without sunlight?
  • What was done to both plants?
  • For how many days was the plant watered?
  • For how many days was the plant was left with/without sunlight?

 

 

Results: What actually happened? Separate Table for Plant B

Plant A

Day #1

Day #2

Day #3

Day#4

Days#5

Appearance of soil

 

 

 

 

 

Appearance of seedling

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discussion:  (Suggestions)

Experiment #1: Effect of Light:

The plant that grew healthy was …………..

This plant grew healthy because ………………

The other plant did not grow well because ………………..

The plant that did not grow well was ………………

 

Experiment #2: Effect of Water:

The plant that grew healthy was …………..

This plant grew healthy because ………………

The other plant did not grow well because ………………..

The plant that did not grow well was ………………

What do you think happened?

 

Conclusion:

It was determined that _______________________________________. 

 

Student’s Names:

Competencies/Skills

NOTE: The assessor is to

þ   the student has demonstrated competence in each.

O –  indicates some level of competency,

X –   indicates a high level of incompetence or incompletion of tasks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follows steps in investigations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is careful in handling material/plants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follows instructions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicates with others

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completes all aspects of the journal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works cooperatively with others

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oral feedback given (indicate by using a tick)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student Checklist – Some examples of competencies/skills given. A mark can be substituted for indicators (x,o, þ)

 

Group Checklist: Place a check mark (√) where behavior is noted.

 

Group Members:

1.       ……..

2.       ……..

3.       ……..

4.       ……..

 

Shares materials amongst group members

Takes turns in completing task

Listens to member’s contribution

Cheers each other, is encouraging.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaboration Rubric

 

Descriptors

Collaborates with others with due consideration for safety of self and others.

Emerging

Has difficulty working with others as well as independently. Demonstrates poor judgment in observing safety practices.

Developing

Works with others once clear roles and tasks are assigned but needs supervision for independent work. Demonstrates fair judgment in observing safety practices.

Competent

Collaborates effectively with others and works independently with little guidance. Adequately demonstrates awareness of safety for self and others.

Excelling

Collaborates effectively with others and can work independently when required. Frequently demonstrates awareness of safety for self and others.

Advance

Demonstrates leadership when working with teams and can work independently. Consistently demonstrates awareness of safety for self and others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                 

My Science Journal

 

 

 

Name:    ________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

Land Unit 4

LEARNING UNIT: Effects of Human Beings on Land

 

Class:  Standard Two    Theme:   My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Estimated frame:  3 weeks

 

Context:

 

All living things have both positive and negative impacts on the environment.  At the primary school level, being aware of how land is positively or negatively affected by human beings allows children to make right choices and develop habits that will help in the enhancement and preservation of land instead of its ill-use and destruction.

 

Outcomes:

 

At the end of these learning experiences students will:

·         recognise that pollution negatively affects the environment and should not be allowed

·         know the steps involved in the research process

·         display respect for self, others and the environment

·         examine the ways in which respect for the environment can boost environmental sustainability

·         demonstrate a basic understanding  of ‘caring’ – caring for the environment

·         express ideas that contribute to the enhancement of the environment

·         give simple justifications for caring for the land

·         describe the importance of caring for the land at home, school and in the community

·         demonstrate a basic understanding of responsibility

·         take part in an environmental project

·         solve problems and display creativity in conducting an environmental project involving  “Reduce, Re-use, Recycle” theme

·         demonstrate teamwork and safe working habits to grow plants

·         display responsibility in caring for plants

·         use their resourcefulness to solve problems and create objects involving  “Reduce, Re-use, Recycle” theme

·         create a poster using the elements of layout and design

·         depict the melodic contour (shape) of familiar songs/excerpts

·         use skills of oral expression applicable to level

·         use the 5Ws+H to gain meaning from audio/audio-visual texts

·         use appropriate listening and speaking behaviours

·         know basic skills in Standard English pronunciation and enunciation

·         use research to acquire meaning

·         use the process approach to writing

·         apply appropriate phonic skills and strategies in reading

·         create audio texts for different purposes and audiences.

 

Learning Plans:

 

1.    Human Impact on Land

2.    Care of the Environment

3.    Making Good Use of Land

4.    Being Responsible for your Actions

5.    Let’s Show We Care

 

Resources:

 

Learning Plan 1: paper, pencil, markers, art supplies, computer, printer, video recorder, videos, pictures, template of steps involved in research and Trinidad and Tobago governmental online websites.

Learning Plan 2: paper, pencil, markers, chart paper, flashcards, journals, art supplies, computers, projector, EMA officer (resource person), pictures, PowerPoint slides, song ‘Bits of Paper’, leaflets, magazines, newspapers, online articles, written scenarios, worksheets and graphic organizer.

Learning Plan 3: markers, paper, art supplies, glue, cloth, gift paper, ribbons, empty plastic bottles, shoe boxes and graphic organisers.

Learning Plan 4: notebooks, computer (possibly projector) for students’ presentation, internet for emails (optional), camera (optional), digital recording equipment (optional), stories or newspaper articles/letters to the editor related to topic (optional) and graphic organisers.

Learning Plan 5: paper, bristol board, pencil, marker, paint, paint brushes, bins or other suitable containers with covers, seedlings, flowering plants, white wash, grow boxes, soil, manure, gloves and gardening tools.

 

Assessments:

 

·         Checklists

·         Oral Questions

·         Projects

·         Rubrics

·         Teacher’s observations

·         Worksheets

 

 

   UNIT FOUR: Effects of Human Beings on Land

Learning Plan: 1 of 5

Class: Standard 2  Term: 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad & Tobago – Land

Duration: 2 days

Topic:  Effects of Human Beings on Land

Context:

The expansion of human activities into the natural environment, as manifested through urbanisation, recreation, industrialisation and agriculture, has the potential to cause damage to the environment. The understanding of human impact on the land is of crucial importance to both social and economic life.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:

Critical Thinking

 

 

Literacy

RReading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

☐ Literary Appreciation

R Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐ Problem Solving

☐ Critical thinking

☐ Communication

☐ Representation

☐ Reasoning

 

R ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

 At the end of this learning experience, students will:

·         discuss the message of audio-visual texts by asking and answering ‘5Ws+H-’ questions

·         articulate appropriate emotional and intellectual responses to audio-visual stimuli

·         define the term pollution

·         state the different types of pollution: land water, air, noise

·         explain four or five causes of land and air pollution

·         outline four or five effects of land and air pollution

·         devise two or three strategies to solve land and air pollution

·         identify agencies responsible for management of the environment

·         orally outline the steps involved in conducting research

·         differentiate in one paragraph between primary and secondary sources of information.

Activities:

Video-viewing

1.    Students view video showing pollution in its various forms:

land, water, air, noise.

2.    Students discuss the types of pollution depicted in the video and identify what each entails using ‘5Ws+H-’ questions.

3.    Students discuss what pollution is and generate a definition for pollution.

4.    Students generate a definition for each type of pollution (land, air, water, noise) from knowledge gained.

 

Causes of Pollution

5.    Students are placed into groups. In their groups, they infer and list the causes of pollution based on the video viewed. As a whole class they use a graphic organiser to list the types, causes and simple solutions to land, water, air and noise pollution. Students discuss what can be done to prevent the various forms of pollution.

6.    Each group presents their ideas to the class. Points are discussed.

 

Research

7.    Teacher introduces and discusses the steps of a simple research process (see the resource folder for this learning plan in the CD for list of steps).  The steps are then outlined on a chart by the teacher. The students orally review the steps outlined on the chart. Teacher models the steps.

8.    Students use the research process to gather information on the causes, effects and solutions to pollution. In groups, they devise two or three strategies to solve aspects of land and air pollution.

 

Scenarios

9.    Students are placed into groups. Each group is presented with a scenario (see samples below). They engage in role-play to depict how they would go about solving the problem identified within the scenario.

Scenario 1

A neighbour places bags filled with garbage by the roadside. The dogs tear apart the bags and drag the rubbish into your yard.

Scenario 2

A nearby tyre shop owner often burns old tyres. The smoke affects you and your family as well as neighbours.

Scenario 3

Your neighbour sweeps his garbage in the drains between his and your homes. The drain becomes clogged and smells bad. Whenever it rains the drain overflows and the water fills up your yard.

Scenario 4

A family in your community often disturbs others by playing very loud music at night for many hours at a time.

 

 

Action Plan

10. In groups, students are guided to write up an action plan (see worksheet in CD) to solve a particular land or air pollution problem.  Students present their action plan to the class.

11. Teacher explains to students what primary and secondary sources of information are:

– Primary sources: teacher/other students, people/places in the community

– Secondary sources: textbooks, leaflets, newspaper, magazines, EMA personnel/materials, online resources

12. Students then individually identify and list the primary and secondary sources of information they used during their research process. Students create one paragraph to state the difference between primary and secondary sources of information.

 

Resources:  

·         Stationery: paper, pencil, marker

·         ICTs: computer, printer, video recorder, videos, pictures

·         Other: worksheets

·         E.M.A. – Environmental Management Authority – http://www.ema.co.tt/

·         I.M.A. – Institute of Marine Affairs – http://www.ima.gov.tt/

Forestry Division – http://www.mphe.gov.tt/contact-us.html  

·         Ministry of Housing and the Environment –

http://www.mphe.gov.tt/contact-us.html

 

Assessment:

·         Checklist for definition and outlining the research process

·         Observation

·         Oral presentation checklist

·         Oral questions

·         Rubric for Action Plan

·         Rubric for paragraph (Differentiate in one paragraph the difference between primary and secondary sources in research)

·         Rubric for research

·         Short explanations

 

   

 

Research Process

Name: ___________________________________________

 

Step1 – Choose the topic

Topic: ______________________________________________________________

 

Step 2 – Refine the topic / be more specific

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 3 – Find basic information

Basic Information:

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 4 – Locate/Retrieve other materials

Materials Acquired

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 5 – Locate information relevant to the topic

Information relevant to topic:

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Step 6 – Take Notes

Notes

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Step 7 – Construct Project

Outline Project (brief)

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Action Plan

  1. What we want to accomplish

 

 

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  1. Assign tasks to team members

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  1. Create a list of action steps

For each task there should be a list of things to do in sequential order

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  1. List steps in order of importance

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  1. Collaborate to make a final statement

 

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   UNIT FOUR: Effects of Human Beings on Land

Learning Plan: 2 of 5

Class: Standard 2  Term: 1

Theme: My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 3 days

Topic: Care of the Environment

Context:

Responsible citizens consistently demonstrate care for the environment. In order to become responsible citizens, students need to have knowledge and an understanding of ways in which they can show care for the land, the overall benefits of doing so, and the possible consequences of not doing so, as well as how to solve environmental problems. This knowledge will allow them to develop positive attitudes and habits that will promote long-term care for the environment.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:

Problem Solving

Understanding Consequences

 

Literacy

RReading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

☐ Literary Appreciation

R Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐ Problem Solving

☐ Critical thinking

☐ Communication

☐ Representation

☐ Reasoning

 

R ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         use their bodies and graphic representations to accurately depict the melodic contour (shape) of familiar songs/excerpts

·         create mental images based on given stimuli

·         connect stimuli to personal and collective experiences

·         organize paragraphs using a topic sentence and supporting details

·         apply the process approach to writing to compose paragraphs

·         describe 2-3 ways in which care for the land, air and water can be demonstrated

·         evaluate methods selected for caring for the land

·         cite 2-3 benefits of caring for the land

·         infer 2-3 possible consequences of failing to care for the land

·         recommend at least one solution to a given environmental issue: flooding, landslides, smoke/fumes, build-up of debris/pollutants in drainage systems

·         apply the steps in the research process to formulate a plan to solve an environmental problem in the school

·         sequence assigned tasks so as to have them done on time and as required.

 

Activities:

 

Melodic contour

1.    Teacher instructs students to observe him/her carefully as he/she sings the song ‘Bits of Paper’ simultaneously moving a hand in an up-down fashion to indicate higher and lower pitches. Teacher questions students about what they observed in relation to his/her voice and hand.

2.    Students sing the song and pattern teacher’s hand movements according to the pitch of the notes. This is done a few times.

3.    Students get into groups of 5 and stoop down. They practice singing the song while moving their bodies up and down according to the notes. Alternatively, students form a long line and are given flashcards of the words of the song. As they sing, each flashcard is moved up or down according to the pitches.

4.    Teacher demonstrates drawing a line (like a line graph) to represent the pitches within the melody of the first two phrases of the song. Students complete the line graph for the next three phrases.

How do we show care for our environment?

5.    Teacher litters the yard with crumpled newspaper. Students are taken outdoors and, as they sing the song ‘Bits of Paper’, they pick up the paper and throw them in the bin. Teacher elicits the message within the rhyme and links it to care of the environment.

6.    Students are exposed to stimulus material (presentation by Environmental Management Authority (EMA). officer/pictures/PowerPoint slides) based on care, and lack of care, for the environment. Through discussion, students identify ways in which one can show care for the environment and as well as those actions that show lack of care for the environment.

7.    Students are given the opportunity to connect stimulus material to their personal and collective experiences by sharing situations that they may have experienced or that exist in their own community.

8.    Students are placed in three large groups. Each group is given a set of pictures that depict care of the environment – land, air and water. Students select and use a suitable graphic organizer to chart their ideas using the pictures as well as words/phrases. These are orally presented to the class and displayed on the wall.

Methods for solving environmental problems

9.    Teacher points students to relevant materials (leaflets, magazines, newspapers, online articles) that allow them to engage in research to find out what methods are used to solve environmental problems that exist in Trinidad and Tobago. As part of homework, students can also interview parents or others in their community. Findings are presented and discussed. Teacher encourages students to (1) share their opinions on whether they think that the methods used to counteract environmental problems are working/not working/can be improved upon etc. and (2) to suggest other methods of solving same.

Let’s reap the benefits

10. Teacher asks the questions “Who benefits from caring for the land? What are some of these benefits?” Students employ the Think-Pair-Share strategy their answers indicating the benefits.

E.g. We all benefit from planting trees/not cutting down trees because trees keep the air clean and may provide us with food and other products, and this keeps us healthy….

The point that, in the end, everyone benefits is made abundantly clear to students.

11. Students write in their journals 2-3 benefits of caring for the land.

Story Drama – Consequences of lack of care for the land

12. Students are placed in small groups of 4-5. Teacher presents each group with a scenario depicting failure to care for the land.

E.g. A group of students were walking home from school. They stopped at the shop and bought snacks and drinks. When they reached a river, they threw their snack paper and empty cans/bottles into it.

13. Each group reads and discusses the scenario then creates a short story-drama based on it. They must include simple dialogue indicating that the action within the scenario shows lack of care for the land and the effect/s of such an action.

14. Students complete a worksheet with given stems based on consequences of failure to care for the land.

E.g. If we dump garbage into the river ……

                  If we continue to quarry the land……

How can we solve our environmental problems?

15.  Students are placed in 4 groups. Each group is asked to focus on one of the following issues: flooding, landslides, smoke/fumes, build-up of debris/pollutants in drainage systems. In their groups, students brainstorm and research ways of solving these issues. Each group then chooses one member to present their ideas to the rest of the class. Ideas are discussed and additions made as necessary.

 

Independent Writing/Shared Reading

16. Students are asked to imagine that they are EMA officials who have to give a talk about environmental issues and how they can be solved. Using the process approach to writing, students write what they would present. They share their writing with their peers via the buddy-reading strategy/whole.

Action Plan

17. Students apply the steps of the research process to investigate and identify environmental problems within their school e.g. littering, noise, drainage, dust, fumes/foul smell, flies, stray dogs etc. (Students can be grouped according to the number of issues existing. If no problems exist, they can be imagined). Guided by the teacher, students formulate and implement a simple, sequential action plan to solve the problem/s.

Sequenced steps can include:

–       investigation/research – observing problem/s within their school

–       collaborative planning – coming up with a plan to solve the problem/s

–       implementation – practical hands-on activities

–       sharing – giving feedback/results/video-taping (class/whole school)

–       review/reflection – e.g. journal/log

Resources:

·         Stationery: paper, pencil, markers, chart paper, flashcards, journal books

·         Art Supplies

·         ICTs: computers, projector, EMA officer, pictures, PowerPoint slides

·         Literature: song ‘Bits of Paper’, leaflets, magazines, newspapers, online articles, written scenarios

·         Others: worksheets, graphic organizer

 

Assessment:

·         Checklist for chart-making

·         Co-operation/collaboration rubric

·         Observation checklist

·         Participation rubric

·         Project rubric

·         Story drama checklist

·         Worksheet

 

   

 

Song: “Bits of Paper”

Bits of paper, bits of paper

Lying on the floor, lying on the floor

Makes the place untidy, makes the place untidy

Pick them up, pick them up

 

Stick picture here

Insert idea

Insert idea

Insert idea

 

 

                                                                                                                                            

   UNIT FOUR: Effects of Human Beings on Land

Learning Plan: 3 of 5

Class: Standard 2  Term: 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 3 hours

Topic:  Making Good Use of Land

Context:

Students examine and discuss personal responsibility in regard to land use.  They are given the opportunity to make suggestions as to the best use of the land available, making connections to preservation of the environment, ethical behaviour and personal impact that individuals can have when making use of land. Students also put into practice their ability to reduce, reuse and recycle materials.

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:

Creative Thinking

Understanding Consequences

 

Literacy

Reading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

☐ Literary Appreciation

R Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐ Problem Solving

☐ Critical thinking

☐ Communication

☐ Representation

☐ Reasoning

 

ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience, students will:

·         describe responsible behaviours in 2-3 written sentences

·         use everyday items in new ways to solve problems

·         manage tasks well

·         use only as much of a resource as is necessary to complete a given task

·         reduce, reuse and recycle items so as to preserve the environment.

 

Activities:

Brainstorming

1.    In groups, students suggest uses for the land in each scenario below. Each group suggests at least two uses for the land, and then shares with the class. More than one group can be given the same scenarios.

Scenario 1: Brian lives in Arima. Arima is a busy town. Right next to his house is an empty lot of land. How do you think Brian can use this land?

Scenario 2:  Tia lives in Port of Spain. Many visitors come to the city. She owns an unused plot of land. How do you think she can use this land?

Scenario 3:   Roger lives in Rio Claro. It is a rural area. There is an empty lot of land next to his house. What can he do with this land?

Making connections through discussion

2.  The class is engaged in a discussion about making good use of land. Students can draw from examples they have seen in their communities where land is not being used in a positive way and suggest uses for the land.

      E.g. Dilapidated buildings in the community can be renovated and used. Land used for illegal dumping can be cleared and used for a community garden, park or beautification project.

Let’s write about it

3.    Students engage in a write, share and pass on. Three students in a group compose three sentences on responsible choices in making good use of land. Each student in the group writes, shares and passes on to other group members. Alternatively, each group could be given a different colour-marker and the same sheet is sent to each group where they write what they think are responsible choices in making good use of land. The colour is used to track what each group contributes.

Reusing and recycling everyday materials to make useful items

4.    Students engage in brainstorming to gain an understanding of the terms reduce, reuse and recycle. (KWL Chart can be used). In groups, students discuss the reasons for the 3Rs, then share how they can reduce, reuse and recycle at home, at school or in their immediate environment. Students create a graphic organizer (see example pull out or a simple web map can be used to organize their thoughts) to share information on what they can reduce, what they can reuse and how they can recycle items.

5.    In groups, students are given (they can be asked to bring these items in the day before) items that can be discarded to come up with ideas for re-using so as to reduce the problem of excessive waste. E.g. shoe boxes, paper towel rolls, 2 litre plastic bottles, small soft drink bottles. Students can paint, cover and decorate to make items. Students can also make recycled paper from old newspaper.(See notes for ideas in recycling)

 

Resources:  

·         Stationery: markers, paper,

·         Art Supplies: glue, cloth, gift paper

·         ICTs: pictures, videos

·         Literature: graphic organizer

·         Others: empty plastic bottles, shoe boxes

 

Assessment:

·         Student/Group observation checklist

·         Rubric for creative pieces

·         Rubric for Creative Writing piece

 

   

 

Name: ________________________________________________

 

 

Reduce

 

 

 

Reuse

 

 

 

 

Recycle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reduce

 

Reuse

 

Recycle

 

1.        

 

 

2.        

 

 

3.        

 

 

4.        

 

 

5.        

 

 

6.        

 

 

7.        

 

 

8.        

 

 

9.        

 

 

10.    

 

 

11.    

 

 

12.    

 

 

13.    

 

 

14.

 

 

Name:  _____________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reduce

Recycle

Reuse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ideas for Recycling Items

Plastic Bottles

                   

Links for paper recycling

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Paper

   shoeboxes

 Tyre for planting,

Feed bags – Sand bags to prevent erosion or embankment

 Compost heap – recycle vegetables ends and peels

   UNIT FOUR: Effects of Human Beings on Land

Learning Plan: 4 of 5

Class: Standard 2  Term: 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 5 sessions  – 30 minutes each

Topic:  Being Responsible for your Actions – Writing and Speaking

Context:

Students need to be clear about the ways in which they can contribute to protecting their environment and the reasons for doing so. This learning plan uses writing and oral communication skills to ensure learners understand their role as responsible citizens of Trinidad and Tobago.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:

Assertiveness

Effective Communication

 

Literacy

RReading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

☐ Literary Appreciation

☐ Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐ Problem Solving

☐ Critical thinking

☐ Communication

☐ Representation

☐ Reasoning

 

R ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         give simple justifications for caring for the land

·         suggest ways in which to preserve and enhance the environment

·         examine the ways in which respect for the environment can boost environmental sustainability

·         organize paragraphs using a topic sentence and supporting details

·         use transitional words and phrases to link sentences and paragraphs

·         write paragraphs and friendly letters using a process approach

·         speak using Standard English and other applicable speaking behaviours, and appropriate listening behaviours in class discussions and presentations.

 

Activities:

Getting the ideas

1.    Discussions are led by students and/or teacher to review ideas/suggestions on the topics below (topics would have been done before).

 

Graphic organisers are used to note ideas on:

Ø   Ways to care for the land: litter in the bins, cutting grass/keeping land clear of garbage, not cutting down trees without valid reasons etc.

Ø   Ways to preserve environment: use resources wisely and carefully, protect animals and plants etc.

Ø   Ways to enhance the environment: plant trees and flowers (beautification projects), clean-up litter, keep grass low, place bins around areas, create parks etc. (Refer to resources section, learning plan #5, Unit #4 for organisers OR search online for useful ones.)

Ø   Why it is important to care for the environment (for sustainability): the land/environment provides us with what we need – food, water, shelter, jobs etc., we have to protect the place we live in and what belongs to us because… etc.

2.    Ideas are checked by other students and teacher for accuracy. These will be used for the writing activity later.

 

Let us write – paragraphs OR letters OR emails

3.    Teacher demonstrates how to use the ideas/suggestions from activity above to begin writing. It will be necessary to review examples and use of topic sentence and main idea, transitional words and phrases for sentences, and paragraphs. Teacher writes and reads for students at least two examples while explicitly explaining how to use the ideas to compose.

4.    Writing can take the form of paragraphs (perhaps two to three), letters to newsletters/neighbours/friends, or emails to friends/teacher/parent. It would be nice to mail letters (as a publishing strategy), display paragraphs and print-outs of emails.

5.    As part of their writing, students can take OR source pictures related to their writing. Teacher can show them how to write a caption/label for the picture as part of the written piece.

 

Debate forum

6.    Students are told about the debate: how, why, what, who etc. Reference is made to simple discussions they have where opinions and ideas are exchanged (Students would have been engaged in a debate in Unit 2.)

7.    A forum/stage is created for students to engage in a whole-class discussion organised as a debate. Groups of students will be given related ‘FOR’ and ‘AGAINST’ topics to prepare; ideas from their writing activities should inform this activity. The teacher may need to physically re-arrange the classroom for this activity. Teacher guides the debate.

Topics may include:

Ø Clearing land to build industries/houses.

Ø Dispute between neighbours – one owns a piece of land and dumps rubbish on it; the other is tired of asking him/her to clean it up.

8.    A rubric may be used to assess students’ discussions/points and their speaking and listening behaviours during the activities.

9.    Extension: Students can be recorded using a digital recorder (voice only) or a digital camera/recorder (voice and image) for playback and commentary. Students can assess themselves, identifying strengths and weaknesses in oral presentations/speaking and listening behaviours.

 

Resources:  

·         Stationery: notebooks, pencils, markers, chart paper/whiteboard, glue

·         ICTs: computer (possibly projector) for students’ presentation, internet for emails (optional), pictures, camera (optional), digital recording equipment (optional)

·         Literature: all prior materials based on the topic, stories or newspaper articles/letters to the editor related to topic (optional)

·         Others: graphic organisers

 

Assessment:

·         Oral questions

·         Debate using teacher-made rubric

·         Pieces of work to be assessed using simple rubric

·         Simple Oral Communication rubric (adapted from available ones in Tool Kit) for students to self-assess during or after the debate

 

   

 

     UNIT FOUR: Effects of Human Beings on Land

Learning Plan: 5 of 5

Class: Standard 2  Term: 1

Theme:  My Country: The Environment of Trinidad and Tobago – Land

Duration: 5-7 days

Topic: Let’s Show We Care

Context:

The amount and proper disposal of garbage generated in today’s world continues to be a cause for concern. There is a dire need to reduce, reuse and recycle our waste products so that this problem can be minimised. It is therefore crucial that, at a very young age, students become actively involved in the preservation of the environment.

 

CONSIDERATIONS:

 

R HFLE:

Cooperation

Decision Making

 

Literacy

☐Reading

RWriting

R Oral Communication

☐ Literary Appreciation

R Media & Information Literacy

 

Numeracy

☐ Problem Solving

☐ Critical thinking

☐ Communication

☐ Representation

☐ Reasoning

 

R ICT Skills

 

R Differentiated Instruction

 

R Assessment for Learning

Outcomes:

At the end of this learning experience students will:

·         identify ways of preserving the environment through reusing, recycling and reducing waste

·         reduce, reuse and recycle items to preserve the environment

·         contribute to the upkeep of the environment

·         create a poster that promotes reducing, reusing and recycling using all elements of design and layout

·         be active and helpful by taking part in an environmental project

·         generate ideas for creating audio and/or audio-visual text for various purposes and audiences

·         create a public service announcement to the school community using the appropriate media tools

·         demonstrate teamwork and safe working habits to grow plants

·         demonstrate responsibility in caring for plants

·         collaborate to grow plants

·         enjoy growing plants

·         sing a song using correct tempo and with a pleasing tone based on the theme ‘Reduce, Reuse and Recycle’.

Activities:

Students will be guided by the teacher to execute projects based on preservation of the environment. Students can do the following activities:

 

Project 1 –  Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

1.    The terms reduce, reuse and recycle are reviewed through discussion. Students brainstorm ways in which garbage can be reduced.

–       Set up bins in school to collect and separate waste, into plastic, paper and other. (If bins are unavailable, students can write letters to source these either through corporative sponsors, donations or any other source). They create signs to place on bins ensuring that the labelling is clear and concise.

–       The bins are set up strategically on the school’s compound and students are encouraged to dispose of their garbage making use of the appropriate bins.

–       Students create posters to promote reducing, reusing and recycling and post them around the school.

–       Students create/learn a four-line jingle (see attached sample) on reducing, reusing and recycling and sing it as they go about their activities.

 

Project 2 – Environmental Beautification

2.    Students select a particular area in the school, plan and execute a beautification project for the area e.g. plant flowers, rock garden, label plants, whitewash tree trunks/stones around plants etc.

3.    Students work on “plant a tree project” where trees are planted in various parts of the school/community to enhance it.

 

Project 3 – Advertisement

4.    In groups, students brainstorm ideas for an advertisement (audio and/or audio-visual). They create a simple1-minute script, practise and perform speech/drama parts to create their advertisements. These are recorded and played to class/school.

 

Resources:  

·         Stationery: paper, Bristol board, pencil, marker etc.

·         Art Supplies: paint, brushes

·         ICT: recording devices (video/audio)

·         Bins or other suitable containers with covers

·         Seedlings, flowering plants, white-wash, grow boxes, soil, manure, gloves, gardening tools, etc.

 

Assessment:

·         Observation checklist

·         Project rubric

   

 

Sample Jingle (to the tune of Row, Row, Row Your Boat)

Let’s all lend a hand

To take care of our land

Reduce, reuse, recycle please

And take care of our trees

 

Definitions                     

Reduce – to decrease the amount of waste produced

Reuse – using discarded or waste materials to create other useful products to prevent wastage

Recycle – the reprocessing of materials into new products e.g. glass, paper, cans, plastic